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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

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Edgar Allan Poe : 

'At sixteen I discovered the work of Edgar Allan Poe. I happened to read first his biography, and the sadness of his life made a great impression on me. I felt an enormous pity for him, because in spite of his talent he had never been happy.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : 

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Sophocles : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Euripides : 

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Euripides : [all plays]

'I told him of my having now read every play of Euripides; & he seemed very much surprised [...] and observed, that very few men had done as much'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Feuillet Octave : La Petite Comtesse

'The other day for a treat Charlie got me La Petite Comtesse to read. I never was more delighted with any story. It is so beautifully and pathetically written, but so sad that it made me miserable. I shan't read any more books. For a whole day after I had finished my charming petite comtesse, I found I took not the faintest interest in any of my household duties, and wanted only to sit by the fire and read, read, read, all through my life.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Katey Dickens      Print: Book

  

Alfred, Lord Tennyson : Funeral Ode

'That time Lord Tennyson was delightful - kind and friendly and full of stories, talking a great deal, and in the best of humours. He read the Funeral Ode to us afterwards, and one or two shorter poems (Blow, Bugles, Blow); and I was so glad and thankful that Cecco should see him so, and have such a bright recollection of him to carry through his life.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred, Lord Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Francis Lathom : Midnight Bell, a German Story, Founded on Incidents in Real Life

'My father is now reading the Midnight Bell, which he has got from the library, and mother sitting by the fire.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Austen      Print: Book

  

Inigo Jones : Stonehenge Restored

'In the year 1655. was published by Mr Web a Booke intituled Stonehenge-restored (but writt by Mr Inigo Jones) which I read with great delight: there is a great deale of Learning in it: but, having compared his Scheme with the Monument it self, I found he had not dealt fairly: but had made a Lesbians rule, which is conformed to the stone: that is, he framed the Monument to his own Hypothesis, which is much differing from the Thing it self. This gave me an edge to make more researches.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Aubrey      Print: Book

  

Samuel Egerton Brydges : Arthur Fitz-Albini: a Novel

'We have got Fitz-Albini; my father has bought it against my private wishes, for it does not quite satisfy my feelings that we should purchase the only one of Egerton's works of which his family are ashamed. That these scruples, however, do not at all interfere with my reading it, you will easily believe. We have neither of us yet finished the first volume. My father is disappointed - I am not, for I expected nothing better.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

James Boswell : Tour to the Hebrides

'We have got Boswell's Tour to the Hebrides, and are to have his Life of Johnson.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

William Cowper : unknown

'My father reads Cowper to us in the evening, to which I listen when I can.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Austen      Print: Book

  

 : 

'There was a very long list of Arrivals here, in the Newspaper yesterday, so that we need not immediately dread absolute solitude.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Newspaper

  

Samuel Richardson : Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady

'I am working at Richardson now, and will send you the paper by the end of the week. I suppose I ought to be ashamed to confess that, tedious as he often is, I feel less difficulty in getting through him than in reading Fielding, and that as a matter of taste I actually prefer Lovelace to Tom Jones! I suppose that is one of the differences between men and women which even Ladies' Colleges will not set to rights.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Henry Fielding : Tom Jones

'I am working at Richardson now, and will send you the paper by the end of the week. I suppose I ought to be ashamed to confess that, tedious as he often is, I feel less difficulty in getting through him than in reading Fielding, and that as a matter of taste I actually prefer Lovelace to Tom Jones! I suppose that is one of the differences between men and women which even Ladies' Colleges will not set to rights.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Edward Jenkins : Ginx's Baby

'I sympathise most warmly in a great deal that is said in the 'Ginx's Baby' book, and do actually express my own sentiments in what I say about it. And I admire immensely the "Peasant Life".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

unknown : Peasant Life

'I sympathise most warmly in a great deal that is said in the 'Ginx's Baby' book, and do actually express my own sentiments in what I say about it. And I admire immensely the "Peasant Life".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

George Chesney : Battle of Dorking

'If your old contributors had to yield the pas to such writers only as the author of the "Battle of Dorking" we should have little to complain of. It is wonderfully fine and powerful. Is it Laurence Oliphant? I can't think of anybody else with such a power of realism and wonderful command of the subject. It is vivid as Defoe.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Montalembert : journals of Montalembert

'Montalembert, it appears, kept a journal from his twelfth year to the end of his life, and I am tantalised with the sight of these volumes, which Madame de M. reads to me for a couple of hours in the afternoon.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Madame de Montalembert      Manuscript: Codex

  

Collins : unknown

'I agree with you that Mr Collins's volumes are very good, but I don't agree with you about Mr Trollope, whose "Caesar" I cannot read without laughing - it is so like Johnny Eames.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Anthony Trollope : Caesar

'I agree with you that Mr Collins's volumes are very good, but I don't agree with you about Mr Trollope, whose 'Caesar' I cannot read without laughing - it is so like Johnny Eames.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Alexander William Kinglake : Eothen

'Pray tell him [Mr Kinglake] that I have been an admirer of his for - Heaven knows how long! - since the days when I was shocked and delighted by "Eothen." I remember being very much amused by the opening out of two old neighbours of mine at Ealing, after a discussion of his first volume. In the enthusiasm created by it one of them, an old Peninsular officer, instructed me carefully how to make a pontoon bridge and get my (!) troops over it; while the other, Admiral Collinson, burst forth into naval experiences.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Major Lockhart : [verses]

'By the bye, how good and clever his (Major Lockhart's) verses are which you sent me...'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      

  

Alexander Allardyce : City of Sunshine

'There is a novel not very long published by a Mr Allardyce called the "City of Sunshine", entirely about Indian (not Anglo-Indian) life, which gives a very fine picture of an old Mohammedan officer in the old sepoy army. It is a very clever book. I don't know if it would interest you, who have the real thing under your eyes, as much as it interests us, or I would put it into the next box that is sent.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Margaret Oliphant : Mrs Arthur

'I went to one of my clubs to have some tea, and look - but with little hope - for a novel really attractive to me after having finished "Mrs Arthur", and then - a happy surprise, for I had never been prepared for it by any advertisement - I found awaiting me "Carita"! As far as I have gone I like it immensely.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: A.W. Kinglake      Print: Book

  

Margaret Oliphant : Carita

'I went to one of my clubs to have some tea, and look - but with little hope - for a novel really attractive to me after having finished "Mrs Arthur", and then - a happy surprise, for I had never been prepared for it by any advertisement - I found awaiting me "Carita"! As far as I have gone I like it immensely.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: A.W. Kinglake      Print: Book

  

Alphonse Daudet : [novels]

'I think very highly of Daudet as a novelist, but I know nothing of him personally.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

 : Blackwood's Magazine

'I ought to have written last month to thank you and your able contributor for the flattering mention made of me in the article on Magazines, but the coming here complicated my other businesses, and I did not even read the article till somewhat late in the month. I am now overwhelmed by Mr Shand's (it is Mr Shand?) civilities in the present number.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Times, The

'I read with sad interest the references to your brother's battery in the 'Times' this morning.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Newspaper

  

Heinrich Heine : De l'Allemagne

'I have just been reading Heine's "De l'Allemagne", a very amusing book.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Romano (Cecco) Oliphant      Print: Book

  

 : [newspaper]

'I think this extract from a western newspaper pretty nearly beats the record (slang again) for confusion of metaphors: "He [Sir Stafford Northcote] is a statesman, the blaze of whose parliamentary escutcheon has never yet been dimmed by the bar-sinister or inconsistency." What do you think of that?'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Romano (Cecco) Oliphant      Print: Newspaper

  

Thomas Sherlock : [sermons]

'She read sermons and other religious books, her favourite sermons being "professedly practical", without too much "Regeneration and Conversion", especially Sherlock's'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

unknown : [novels]

[Austen and her family were] 'great novel readers and not ashamed of being so'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Maria Edgeworth : [novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Ann Radcliffe : [Gothic novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Regina Maria Roche : [novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : [novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Laetitia Matilda Hawkins : [novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Jane West : [novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in Search of a Wife

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

 : Lady's Magazine

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Lennox : Female Quixote, The

'She enjoyed comic didactic novels, with Lennox's "The Female Quixote" and Barrett's "The Heroine" being especially admired..., both satires on female misreading which shaped her fullest treatment of the subject in "Northanger Abey".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Eaton Barrett : The Heroine

'She enjoyed comic didactic novels, with Lennox's "The Female Quixote" and Barrett's "The Heroine" being especially admired..., both satires on female misreading which shaped her fullest treatment of the subject in "Northanger Abey".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Sir Charles Grandison

'Her favourite novels included those of Burney, whom she thought "the very best of English novelists", and of Richardson, especially "Sir Charles Grandison".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Joseph Addison : The Spectator

'Hester Thrale compared herself to Swift's Vanessa who "held Montaigne and read- / while Mrs Susan comb'd her Head", and read the "Spectator" to her daughters while her "Maid... was dressing [her] Hair".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hester Thrale      Print: Serial / periodical, Could have been periodical in bound form

  

unknown : unknown

'Landscape gardener Humphry Repton's wife read to him while he drew''.

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Humphry Repton      

  

Maria Edgeworth : [novels]

'Thomas Moore regularly read to his wife for two hours after dinner, at one point "going through Miss Edgeworth's works".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Moore      Print: Book

  

Eusebius : Life of Constantine the Great

'Dr Delany read his wife an eclectic range of books from Eusebius' "Life of Constantine the Great" to "Peregrine Pickle".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dr Delany      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Peregrine Pickle

'Dr Delany read his wife an eclectic range of books from Eusebius' "Life of Constantine the Great" to "Peregrine Pickle".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Patrick Delany      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Sir Charles Grandison

'In 1753 Catherine Talbot stayed with the Berkeley family and participated enthusiastically in readings of "Sir Charles Grandison".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine Talbot      Print: Book

  

Alan Ramsay : The Gentle Shepherd

'Susan Sibbald knew Scottish shepherd Wully Carruthers who was a fellow-subscriber to the circulating library at Melrose, but while she borrowed Ann Radcliffe, he read "Ancient and Modern History", though he did sometimes read a "novel or nonsense buke", like "Sir Charles Grandison". He had also read Alan Ramsay's "The Gentle Shepherd", and contrasted it ironically with the life of a real shepherd.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wully Carruthers      Print: Book

  

 : [ancient and modern history]

'Susan Sibbald knew Scottish shepherd Wully Carruthers who was a fellow-subscriber to the circulating library at Melrose, but while she borrowed Ann Radcliffe, he read "Ancient and Modern History", though he did sometimes read a "novel or nonsense buke", like "Sir Charles Grandison". He had also read Alan Ramsay's "The Gentle Shepherd", and contrasted it ironically with the life of a real shepherd.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wully Carruthers      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Sir Charles Grandison

'Susan Sibbald knew Scottish shepherd Wully Carruthers who was a fellow-subscriber to the circulating library at Melrose, but while she borrowed Ann Radcliffe, he read "Ancient and Modern History", though he did sometimes read a "novel or nonsense buke", like "Sir Charles Grandison". He had also read Alan Ramsay's "The Gentle Shepherd", and contrasted it ironically with the life of a real shepherd.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wully Carruthers      Print: Book

  

Ann Radcliffe : 

'Susan Sibbald knew Scottish shepherd Wully Carruthers who was a fellow-subscriber to the circulating library at Melrose, but while she borrowed Ann Radcliffe, he read "Ancient and Modern History", though he did sometimes read a "novel or nonsense buke", like "Sir Charles Grandison". He had also read Alan Ramsay's "The Gentle Shepherd", and contrasted it ironically with the life of a real shepherd.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Susan Sibbald      Print: Book

  

Jane Austen : Sense and Sensibility

'Princess Charlotte wrote of reading as a "great passion"; in a poignant attempt to construct bourgeois domestic intimacy in the dysfunctional household of the divorced Prince Regent she discussed and exchanged books with her friend Margaret Mercer Elphinstone, including memoirs and recent history, Byron's poems, and novels including Gothic fiction and works by Anne Plumptre and Jane Austen. (The perceptive Charlotte especially enjoyed "Sense and Sensibility" because she discerned in herself"the same imprudence" as Marianne's).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Princess Charlotte      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : [poems]

'Princess Charlotte wrote of reading as a "great passion"; in a poignant attempt to construct bourgeois domestic intimacy in the dysfunctional household of the divorced Prince Regent she discussed and exchanged books with her friend Margaret Mercer Elphinstone, including memoirs and recent history, Byron's poems, and novels including Gothic fiction and works by Anne Plumptre and Jane Austen. (The perceptive Charlotte especially enjoyed "Sense and Sensibility" because she discerned in herself"the same imprudence" as Marianne's).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Princess Charlotte      Print: Book

  

 : [memoirs and history]

'Princess Charlotte wrote of reading as a "great passion"; in a poignant attempt to construct bourgeois domestic intimacy in the dysfunctional household of the divorced Prince Regent she discussed and exchanged books with her friend Margaret Mercer Elphinstone, including memoirs and recent history, Byron's poems, and novels including Gothic fiction and works by Anne Plumptre and Jane Austen. (The perceptive Charlotte especially enjoyed "Sense and Sensibility" because she discerned in herself"the same imprudence" as Marianne's).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Princess Charlotte      Print: Book

  

Anne Plumptre : [novels]

'Princess Charlotte wrote of reading as a "great passion"; in a poignant attempt to construct bourgeois domestic intimacy in the dysfunctional household of the divorced Prince Regent she discussed and exchanged books with her friend Margaret Mercer Elphinstone, including memoirs and recent history, Byron's poems, and novels including Gothic fiction and works by Anne Plumptre and Jane Austen. (The perceptive Charlotte especially enjoyed "Sense and Sensibility" because she discerned in herself"the same imprudence" as Marianne's).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Princess Charlotte      Print: Book

  

Alain Rene Le Sage : Gil Blas

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Mary Wortley Montagu : [Letters]

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

 : [newspaper]

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Newspaper

  

 : [magazine]

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Serial / periodical

  

James Boswell : Tour of the Hebrides

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Mungo Park : Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

[Madame] de Genlis : 

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : The Cottagers of Glenburnie

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Hilaire Belloc : 'The Dons', 'The Poor of London'

'Yesterday my Elizabeth and I went to the most remarkable poets' Reading I have ever attended. It was held at Lord Byron's beautiful house in Piccadilly... I was moved by Mr de la Mare reading five poems of great beauty. Elizabeth was thrilled at seeing for the first time W.H. Davies, a strange tiny poet. He read "Love's Silent Hour" and three others. Hilary [Hilaire Belloc] read "The Poor of London" and "the Dons". He got a big reception'.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilaire Belloc      

  

Walter de la Mare : [five poems]

'Yesterday my Elizabeth and I went to the most remarkable poets' Reading I have ever attended. It was held at Lord Byron's beautiful house in Piccadilly... I was moved by Mr de la Mare reading five poems of great beauty. Elizabeth was thrilled at seeing for the first time W.H. Davies, a strange tiny poet. He read "Love's Silent Hour" and three others. Hilary [Hilaire Belloc] read "The Poor of London" and "the Dons". He got a big reception'.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Walter de la Mare      

  

William Henry Davies : 'Love's Silent Hour' and three other poems

'Yesterday my Elizabeth and I went to the most remarkable poets' Reading I have ever attended. It was held at Lord Byron's beautiful house in Piccadilly... I was moved by Mr de la Mare reading five poems of great beauty. Elizabeth was thrilled at seeing for the first time W.H. Davies, a strange tiny poet. He read "Love's Silent Hour" and three others. Hilary [Hilaire Belloc] read "The Poor of London" and "the Dons". He got a big reception'.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Henry Davies      

  

 : The History of Whittington and his Cat

'Robert Colyer, who rose to become a celebrated Unitarian minister, deliberately chose to dwell upon the moment when, as a child labourer in a Fewston linen factory, he bought his first book, "The History of Whittington and his Cat":..."in that first purchase lay the spark of a fire which has not yet gone down to white ashes, the passion which grew with my growth to read all the books in the early years I could lay my hands on, and in this wise prepare me in some fashion for the work I must do in the ministry... I see myself in the far-away time and cottage reading, as I may truly say in my case, for dear life".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Collyer      Print: Book

  

Byron : Don Juan

'Thursday 16 sept 1824. Had a visit from my friend Henderson of Milton who brought 'Don Juan' in his Pocket' [He] 'advisd me to raed 'Don Juan'we talkd about books & flowers & butterflyes till noon& then he discanted on Don Juan [...] I think a good deal of his opinion & shall read it when I am able. 'Friday 17 Sept Began Don Juan 2 verses of the Shipwreck very fine & the character of Haideeisthe best I have yet met...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Homer : The Iliad

'Growing up in extreme poverty in East London, Crooks spent 2d. on a secondhand "Iliad" and was dazzled: "What a revelation it was to me. Pictures of romance and beauty I had never dreamed of suddenly opened up before my eyes. I was transported from the East End to an enchanted land. It was a rare luxury for a working lad like me just home from work to find myself suddenly among the heroes and nymphs of ancient Greece".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Crooks      Print: Book

  

 : John Bull Magazine

"Bought the John Bull Magazine out of curiosity to see if I was among the black sheep it grows in dulness thats one comfort to those that it nicknames 'Humbugs' [.]"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : The New Testament

'came home & read a chapter or two in the New Testament'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

John Foxe : Foxes Book of Martyrs

I have read Foxes book of Martyrs & finished it today

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : The Bible

' A Jesuit reported on a Puritan meeting in the late 1580s: "Each of them had his own Bible, and sedulously turned the pages and looked up the texts cited by the preachers, discussing the passages among themselves to see whether they had quoted them to the point, and accurately, and in harmony with their tenets. Also, they would start arguing among themselves about the meaning of passages from the Scriptures - men, women, boys, girls, rustics, labourers and idiots..."'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Puritans     Print: Book

  

Izaak Walton : The Complete Angler

'The rainy morning has kept me at home & I have amused myself heartily sitting under Waltons Sycamore tree hearing him discourse of fish ponds & fishing. What a delightful book it is the best English Pastoral

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : The London Magazine

Read the September No of the London Mag: only 2 good articles in it-'Blakesmore in H-shire' by Elia & review of 'Goethe' by De Quincey these are excellent and sufficient to make a bad No. interesting.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : The Bible

'I have read the first chapter of Genesis the beginning of which is very fine but the sacred historian took a great deal on credit for this world when he imagines that god created the sun moon & stars [...] for no other purpose than its use " the greater light to rule the day & the lesser light to rule the night" ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [Puritanic and abstruse divinity texts]

'Aucterderran, Fife: In common with the rest of Scotland, the vulgar are, for their station, literate, beyond all other nations. Puritanic and abstruse divinity come in for a sufficient share in their little stock of books; and it is perhaps peculiar to them, as a people, that they endeavour to form opinions by reading, as well as by frequent conversation, on some very metaphysical points connected with religion, and on the depper doctrines of Christianity. They likewise read, occasionally, a variety of other books unconnected with such subjects... Although the parish consists wholly of the poorer ranks of sociey, newspapers are very generally read and attended to'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Auchterderran, Fife     Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : The Sonnets

'read some of the Sonnets of shakspear which are great favourites of mine & lookd into the Poems of Chatterton to see what he says about flowers & have found that he speaks of the Lady smock [quotes from 'The Battle of Hastings'].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [newspapers]

'They likewise read, occasionally, a variety of other books unconnected with such subjects [religion]... Although the parish consists wholly of the poorer ranks of society, newspapers are very generally read and attended to.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Auchterderran, Fife     Print: Newspaper

  

Thomas Chatterton : 'Poems of Chatterton'

'read some of the Sonnets of shakspear which are great favourites of mine & lookd into the Poems of Chatterton to see what he says about flowers & have found that he speaks of the Lady smock [quotes from 'The Battle of Hastings'].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [newspapers]

'Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries: Several of the farmers read history, magazines and newspapers. The vulgar read almost nothing but books on religious subjects'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries     Print: Newspaper

  

 : Moore's Almanack

'all I have read today is Moores Almanack for the account of the weather which speaks of rain tho it is very hot.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: almanack

  

 : [history]

'Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries: Several of the farmers read history, magazines and newspapers. The vulgar read almost nothing but books on religious subjects'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries     Print: Book

  

 : [magazines]

'Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries: Several of the farmers read history, magazines and newspapers. The vulgar read almost nothing but books on religious subjects'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries     Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : [religious books]

'Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries: Several of the farmers read history, magazines and newspapers. The vulgar read almost nothing but books on religious subjects'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Kirkpatrick-Juxta, Dumfries     Print: Book

  

William Collins Collins : 'Odes' [Appears to be a volume of Odes by various authors]

'Read some of the Odes of Collins think them superior to Grays [...] I cannot describe the pleasure I feel in reading them [...] I find in the same Vol Odes by a poet of the name of Oglivie [...] they appear to me to be bold intruders to claim company with Gray and Collins'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

John Ogilvie : 'Odes' [Appears to be a volume of Odes by various authors]

'Read some of the Odes of Collins think them superior to Grays [...] I cannot describe the pleasure I feel in reading them [...] I find in the same Vol Odes by a poet of the name of Oglivie [...] they appear to me to be bold intruders to claim company with Gray and Collins'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [newspapers]

'Wigtown:...Not only the farmers ,but many of the tradesmen, read the newspapers'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: the people of Wigtown     Print: Newspaper

  

 : 'the Song Solomon'

till noon returnd & read snatches in several poets & the Song of Solomon thought the supposed illusions in that luscious poem to our saviour very overstrained....'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Unknown

  

John Milton : 

'Read in Milton: his account of his blindness is very pathetic & I am always affected to tears'. Makes reference to 'Paradise Lost and 'regaind' "'Comus' & 'Allegro' & 'Penserose' are those which I take up most often"Quotes from 'Comus' ll.291-3.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

Thomas Gray : Letters

Wrote another chapter of my Life read a little in Gray's Letters [...] they are the best letters I have seen & I consider Burns very inferior [.]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      

  

 : The Human Heart

'Look'd over the "Human Heart" the title has little connection with the contents- it displays the art of book making in half filld pages & fine paper'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [travels]

'During the Napoleonic Wars, Scottish cotton-spinner Charles Campbell earned 8s. to 10s. a week, but set aside a few pennies for a subscription library, where he read history, travels and the English classics. He joined a club of twelve men, mainly artisans and mechanics, who met weekly to discuss literary topics'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Campbell      Print: Book

  

 : [history]

'During the Napoleonic Wars, Scottish cotton-spinner Charles Campbell earned 8s. to 10s. a week, but set aside a few pennies for a subscription library, where he read history, travels and the English classics. He joined a club of twelve men, mainly artisans and mechanics, who met weekly to discuss literary topics'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Campbell      Print: Book

  

Josiah Conder : The Star in the East

'Read the poems of Conder over a second time [...] I am much pleasd with many more which I shall read anon'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [English classics]

'During the Napoleonic Wars, Scottish cotton-spinner Charles Campbell earned 8s. to 10s. a week, but set aside a few pennies for a subscription library, where he read history, travels and the English classics. He joined a club of twelve men, mainly artisans and mechanics, who met weekly to discuss literary topics'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Campbell      Print: Book

  

John Hamilton Reynolds : The Garden of Florence

'Began to read again the 'Garden of Florence' by Reynolds it is a beautiful simple tale' [describes other poems in vol].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : Epistle of St John

'read in the testamentthe Epistle of St John I love that simple hearted expression of brotherly affection & love'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : [playbill]

'this morning a play bill was thrown into my house with this pompous blunder on the face of it [...].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Handbill, playbill

  

Keats  : 'La Belle Dame Sans Merci'

'Communication between these poets and myself was instantaneous. I saw with delighted amazement that all poetry had been written specially for me. Although I spoke - in my back street urchin accents - of La Belly Dame Sans Murky, yet in Keats's chill little poem I seemed to sense some essence of the eternal ritual of romantic love. And Tennyson's "Morte d'Arthur" bowled me over. I read it again and again until I fairly lived in a world of "armies that clash by night" and stately weeping Queens. So the poets helped me escape the demands of communal living which now, at thirteen, were beginning to be intolerable to me'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Burnham      Print: Unknown

  

Alfred Tennyson : More d'Arthur

'Communication between these poets and myself was instantaneous. I saw with delighted amazement that all poetry had been written specially for me. Although I spoke - in my back street urchin accents - of La Belly Dame Sans Murky, yet in Keats's chill little poem I seemed to sense some essence of the eternal ritual of romantic love. And Tennyson's "Morte d'Arthur" bowled me over. I read it again and again until I fairly lived in a world of "armies that clash by night" and stately weeping Queens. So the poets helped me escape the demands of communal living which now, at thirteen, were beginning to be intolerable to me'.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Burnham      Print: Unknown

  

 : 

Read the News

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      Print: Newspaper

  

 : [newspapers]

'The political awakening of J.R. Clynes came when three old blind men paid him 3d a week to read the newspapers to them: "Reading aloud was a new joy to me. Some of the articles I read from the local Oldham papers of the time must have been pretty poor stuff I suppose, but they went to my head like wine...'"

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: J.R. Clynes      Print: Newspaper

  

Hugh Kelly : The School for Wives

Nothing Remarkable happend the Morning Noon nor evening of that Day, only Read the play called the Scool for Wifes.

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

I Read the travels of Roderick Random, who had been into different Quarters and he Exposed the severaty of the Captains over the Men, Esspeatialy the Sick, in a Most Shocking Manner, Which I believe in a great Measure to be true.

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'If Clynes needed a second lesson in the subversive power of print, it came when his foreman nearly sacked him for sneaking a look at "Paradise Lost" during a work break at the mill.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: J.R. Clynes      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

Read the Second Part of Mr. Roderick Random

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      

  

 : 

after [a morning walk] I Read the News.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

home [from going to see the King's weekly procession at Kew] & Read the News

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      Print: Newspaper

  

John Bunyan : Pilgrim's Progress

'The son of a Methodist farm worker, he studied Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress" and "The Two Covenants".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

 : The Two Covenants

'The son of a Methodist farm worker, he studied Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress" and "The Two Covenants".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

Robert Burton : The Anatomy of Melancholy

In the year 1650, as I well remember, I was onenight reading in my bed (as it was my custom then to do, in some book or other) in the Anatomy of Melancholy: and coming to this passage of the author, that I have just now cited, viz of his having Jupiter in the sixth house, which made him a physician,I was really non-plust, and Planet-struck for that bout, and forced to lay aside my book, being unwilling to read what I could not understand. I then endeavoured to go to my rest, but in vain, my active genius was watchful, and constantly solicited me,even in my dreams, to enquire, and discover if I could, what Jupiter in the Sixth house meant. . . .I had then. . . some small acquaintance with the learned Dr. Nicholas Fisk. . .who presently gave me such satisfaction in the Point as I was thencapable of receiving.

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Gadbury      Print: Book

  

follower of Joanna Southcott  : 

'Proselytised by a follower of the mystic Joanna Southcott, he read some of his propaganda but found "Some things that did not Correspond with the bible and also that it was a trick to get money so I declined his religion and bid him adue".''

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Unknown

  

Hannah More : The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

'Their Contents were Chiefly to perswade poor people to be satisfied in their situation an not to murmur at the dispensations of providence... those kinds of books were often put into my hands in a dictatorial way in order to convince me of my errors for instance there was [Hannah More's] the Shepherd of Salisbury Plain... the Farmers fireside and the discontented Pendulum and many others which drove me almost into despair for I could see their design'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

 : The Farmer's Fireside

'Their Contents were Chiefly to perswade poor people to be satisfied in their situation an not to murmur at the dispensations of providence... those kinds of books were often put into my hands in a dictatorial way in order to convince me of my errors for instance there was [Hannah More's] the Shepherd of Salisbury Plain... the Farmers fireside and the discontented Pendulum and many others which drove me almost into despair for I could see their design'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

Robert Nelson : Life of Dr. George Bull

Last night sleep departed, I read almost all night Nelsons life of Bp Bull James Clre

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Clegg      Print: Book

  

Richard Baxter : The Saints Everlasting Rest.

At night I read some of the lives and characters of of the Ejected ministers in Dr Calamys account and was much affected with their piety, Zeal and steadiness[...] concluded with reading Mr Baxters Saints. Rest and prayer as usual.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Clegg      Print: Book

  

William Cobbett : 

'he was receptive to the radical anticlericalism of William Cobbett, T.J. Wooler and Richard Carlile... "These books seemed to be founded upon Scripture and Condemned all the sins of oppression in all those that had supremacy over the lower order of people and when I Compared this with the preceptive part of the word of God I began to Conclude that most if not all professors of religion did it only for a Cloake to draw money out of the pockets of the Credulous..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

Richard Carlile : 

'he was receptive to the radical anticlericalism of William Cobbett, T.J. Wooler and Richard Carlile... "These books seemed to be founded upon Scripture and Condemned all the sins of oppression in all those that had supremacy over the lower order of people and when I Compared this with the preceptive part of the word of God I began to Conclude that most if not all professors of religion did it only for a Cloake to draw money out of the pockets of the Credulous..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

Richard Baxter : An abridgement of Mr Baxter's life and times. With

At night I read some of the lives and characters of the Ejected ministers in Dr Calamys account and was much affected with their piety, Zeal and steadiness[...] concluded with reading Mr Baxters Saints. Rest and prayer as usual.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Clegg      Print: Book

  

T.J. Wooler : 

'he was receptive to the radical anticlericalism of William Cobbett, T.J. Wooler and Richard Carlile... "These books seemed to be founded upon Scripture and Condemned all the sins of oppression in all those that had supremacy over the lower order of people and when I Compared this with the preceptive part of the word of God I began to Conclude that most if not all professors of religion did it only for a Cloake to draw money out of the pockets of the Credulous..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

 : The Northampton Mercury

May 24th. My black mare fell down and threw me over her head, but God be praysed I got not the least harm. I rode a slow trot reading the Northampton news paper [...] it was upon Bury Heath.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Coe      Print: Newspaper

  

William Whately : The New-Birth:or, a treatise of regeneration, deli

August 14. I had read Mr Whately of the new birth, and it affected mee exceedingly, and put mee upon prayer, and search of my selfe

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Isaac Archer      Print: Book

  

Richard Sibbes : The Bruised Reed and Smoking Flax

May 3. I found a case putt in Mr A's Vindiciae Pietatis, about a violent inclination from natural temper (which suits mee), wherin he sayeth there is to be a disowning, and resisting ... Soon after in Dr Sibbs his Bruised Reed, I found that resisting sin was one degree of victory, so that if I cannot root out ill thoughts, I will resi[s]t them...

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Isaac Archer      Print: Book

  

Richard Alleine : Vindiciae Pietatis; or, a Vindication of Godliness

May 3. I found a case putt in Mr A's Vindiciae Pietatis, about a violent inclination from natural temper (which suits mee), wherin he sayeth there is to be a disowning, and resisting ... Soon after in Dr Sibbs his Bruised Reed, I found that resisting sin was one degree of victory, so that if I cannot root out ill thoughts, I will resi[s]t them...

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Isaac Archer      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Clarissa Harlowe

At home all day. [...] My wife read part of Clarissa Harlowe to me in the even as I sat a-posting my book.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret 'Peggy' Turner      Print: Book

  

Robert Bloomfield : The Farmers Boy

'Sufferings of the post-horse... from Bloomfields 'the Farmers Boy'...Poplar 7th May 1832. T.W.M.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: T.W.M.      

  

William Cowper : The Negro's complaint

Complete transcript of Cowper's poem.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      

  

James Montgomery : Evening

'Evening [transcription of poem] James Montgomery. Weedon Nov 11th 1836.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group:      

  

James Montgomery : The West Indies

From the 'West Indies' a Poem by Montgomery.Part 2 Page 22 'In These romantic regions[...] From the same, Part 3 'There is a land[...] From the Same part 3. Page 35 'And is the negro outlaw from his birth [...] From the same, part 3rd. Page 40.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Warburton      

  

Thomas Moore : The Song Of Music

Transcription of poem as 'The Song of Music'. 'Moore'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : 'The Fickleness of Love'

'The Fickleness of Love'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : A Reflection at Sea

'A Reflection at Sea'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : Weep Not for Those

'Weep not for Those'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : Stanzas

'Stanzas'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem]'Go, let me weep there's bliss in tears /...'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : Perpetual Adoration

'Perpetual Adoration'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Inspiration of Love

'The Inspiartion of Love'. 'Moore'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Meeting of the Waters

'The Meeting of the Waters'. 'Moore'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Tear

'The Tear / Moore' [transcription of text].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Wintery Smile of Sorrow

'The Wintery smile of Sorrow / Moore' [transcription of text].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

John Bowring : The Infinity Of God

'the infinity of god a Russian fragment translated by Mr Bowring' followed by transcript of text '-yes as a drop of water in the sea /..'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Gray : The Progress of Poesy

transcription of the poem headed 'the progress of poesy./ thos. gray'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Campbell : Hohenlinden

transcript of the poem headed 'battle of hohenlinden / campbell'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Campbell : The dirge of wallace

transcript of the poem headed 'battle of hohenlinden / campbell'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Bernard Barton : To Mary

transcript of the poem headed 'to mary'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Bernard Barton : Winter

transcript of the poem headed 'winter / bernard barton'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Bernard Barton : The Joy /addressed to a young friend

transcript of the poem headed 'the joy / addressed to a young friend / by bernard barton'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Campbell : Gertrude of Wyoming; a Pennsylvanian Tale

'death scene in gertrude of wyoming/ campbell'; there is also a footnote that gives the context of the scene in the tale.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

James Montgomery : Friendship, love and truth

'friendship, love & truth / montgomery'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

James Montgomery : Stanzas, Addressed to a friend on the birth of his first child

'stanzas. addressed to a friend on the birth of his first child. / montgomery'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

James Montgomery : Poet's address to twilight

'poet's address to twilight / montgomery'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

William Wordsworth : Song: she dwelt among th' untrodden ways

'lucy / wordsworth she dwelt in the untrodden ways,beside the springs of dove...' Transcribes text but with significant errors when compared to wordsworth's original. The original first line 'she dwelt among the untrodden ways'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Samuel Rogers : The Sailor

'the sailor / rogers'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Samuel Rogers : An Italian Song

'An Italian Song / Rogers' [transcription of poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Felicia Dorothea Hemans : Coeur De Lion At The Bier Of His Father

'coeurde lion at the bier of his father / new monthly magazine' [includes prose note] [transcription of poem]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      Print: Serial / periodical

  

anon : Lines On The Death Of A General Officer In The East Indies

'lines on the death of a general officer in the east indies / ladies monthly museum' 'the muffled drums dull moan /... [transcription of poem]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Professor Gellert : The Life of Professor Gellert; with a course of ...

Transcription of part of text: 'From Professor Gellerts Moral Lessons / 'Faith in God, the sublime thought...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

William Cowper : My Father! When I learned that thou was Dead

Transcription of Cowper's poem and ''By W. Cowper'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

Laetitia Elizabeth Landon : The Emerald Ring

'the emerald ring' 'it is agem which [...]' [transcribes poem] 'le landon'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Miss Elizabeth Smith : Fragments of prose and verse: by a young lady

'happiness is a very common plant...' 'e. smith's fragments' 'greenock'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Miss Elizabeth Smith : Fragments of prose and verse: by a young lady

'the christain life may be compared...' 'e. smith's fragments'. followed by extract ascribed to 'hannah more' 'those who are rendered unhappy by frivolous troubles seek comfort in frivolous enjoyments...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Miss Elizabeth Smith : Fragments of prose and verse: by a young lady

'the cause of all sin...' 'e.smith's fragments'. signed 'e.d.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Robert Pollok : The course of time

''extract from the course of time' transcribes from 'true happiness had no localities...' to 'where happiness descending, sat and smiled.' signed 'aunt a.' 'quarry bank july 1830'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

James Montgomery : The world before the flood; a poem in ten cantos

'far less shall earth now hastening to decay...' 'world before the flood' 'isle of man June 15th 31'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

James Hogg : Stanzas for music

'stanzas for music by the ettrick shepherd' [transcribes 2 stanzas] 'my sweet little...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Hugh Blair : Sermons

'filled with profound reverence...' 'blair vii p.375' and 'since the time that heaven began...' 'blair's ser vii p.26'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

 : Library of Entertaining Knowledge

[illustration of a Deer, followed by prose on hunting ascribed to] 'Library of Entertaining Knowledge' [part of album with begining of transcript missing].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      

  

Felix MacDonogh : The Hermit in London; or Sketches in English Manne

'Highland Hospitality' 'I once resolved to leave London for a little time [...]' 'Hermit in London'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

John Clare : 'Address to Time' from The Village Minstrel

'To Time' 'In Fancy's eye, what an extended span / ...' 'Clare'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

John Clare : 'On Taste' from The Village Minstrel, Volume II.

'On Taste' 'Taste is from Heaven /...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

John Clare : 'Sorrows for a Friend' from The Village Minstrel,

'On Taste' 'Taste is from Heaven /...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

John Clare : 'Life' from The Village Minstrel, Volume II.

'Life' 'Life thou art misery, or as such to me...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

John Clare : 'Sorrows for a Friend' from The Village Minstrel,

'Sorrows for a Friend' 'O ye brown old oaks that spread the silent wood...' 'Clare'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

 : The Regatta

'The Regatta' [transcribes poem]'Ho! Hearty steeple chasers...' 'Blackwood's Mag 1830'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Pindar : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Callimachus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Apollonius Rhodius : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Quintus Calaber : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Theocritus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Herodotus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Thucydides : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Xenophon : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Aristotle : Politics

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Aristotle : Organon

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plutarch : Lives

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Lucian : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Athenaeus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plautus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plautus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Sophocles : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Pindar : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Theocritus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Terence : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Lucretius : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Catullus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Albius Tibullus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Sextus Propertius : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Lucan : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Silius Italicus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Livy : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Velleius Paterculus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Sallust : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Caesar : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Aristophanes : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Monk : Biography of Richard Bentley

'Macaulay began with the frontispiece, if the book possessed one. "Said to be very like, and certainly full of the character. Energy, acuteness, tyranny, and audacity in every line of the face." Those words are writen above the portrait of Richard Bentley, in Bishop Monk's biography of that famous writer.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Theocritus : Seventh Idyll

' "This is a very good Idyll. Indeed it is more pleasing to me than almost any other pastoral poem in any language. It was my favourite at College. There is a rich profusion of rustic imagery about it which I find nowhere else. It opens a scene of rural plenty and comfort which quite fills the imagination, - flowers, fruits, leaves, fountains, soft goatskins, old wine, singing birds, joyous friendly companions. The whole has an air of reality which is more interesting than the conventional world which Virgil has placed in Arcadia". So Macaulay characterises the Seventh Idyll of Theocritus.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Ben Jonson : The Alchemist

'Of Ben Jonson's Alchemist he writes: "It is very happily managed indeed to make Subtle use so many terms of alchemy, and talk with such fanatical warmth about his 'great art,' even to his accomplice. As Hume says, roguery and enthusiasm run into each other. I admire this play very much. The plot would have been more agreeable, and more rational, if Surly had married the widow whose honor he has preserved. Lovewit is as contemptible as Subtle himself. The whole of the trick about the Queen of Fairy is improbable in the highest degree. But, after all, the play is as good as any in our language out of Shakespeare."'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Ben Jonson : Catiline

'I am a reader in ordinary, and I cannot defend the introduction of the First Catilinarian oration, at full length, into a play. Catiline is a very middling play. The characters are certainly discriminated, but with no delicacy. Jonson makes Cethegus a mere vulgar ruffian. He quite fogets that all the conspirators were gentlemen, noblemen, politicians, probably scholars. He has seized only the coarsest peculiarities of character. As to the conduct of the piece, nothing can be worse than the long debates and narratives which make up half of it.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Alexander Pope : The Rape of the Lock

'Of Pope's Rape of the Lock, Macaulay says: "Admirable indeed! The fight towards the beginning of the last book is very extravagant and foolish. It is the blemish of a poem which, but for this blemish, would be as near perfection in its own class as any work in the world." '

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Horace : Satires

'He thus remarks on the Imitations of Horace's Satires: "Horace had perhaps less wit than Pope, but far more humour, far more variety, more sentiment, more thought. But that to which Horace chiefly owes his reputation, is his perfect good sense and self-knowledge, in whcih he exceeded all men."'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Paul Louis Courier : Le Simple Discours

[Marginalia] 'A most powerful piece of rhetoric as ever I read.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      

  

Paul Louis Courier : Le Simple Discours

'He used to read Courier aloud to his sister at Calcutta of a June afternoon, - in the darkened upstairs chamber, with the punkah swinging overhead, with as much enjoyment as ever Charles James Fox read the romances of Voltaire to his wife in the garden at St. Anne's Hill, though with a less irreproachable accent.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      

  

Bernard Barton : 'Lines written in the first leaf of a friends Albu

'Lines written in the first leaf of a friends Album' 'Bernard Barton' 'The Warrior is[pleased?] when the war is won ....'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

Bernard Barton : Remember Me!

'Remember Me! By Bernard Barton Esq' ' "Remember me!" However brief / Those simple words... [transcribes text]'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

Bernard Barton : Farewell

'Farewell' 'Nay [shy] not from the word "Farewell"! / As if twer friendships knell ...' 'Bernard Barton' [transcribes text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

Samuel Rogers : The Wish

'A Wish' 'Rogers' [transcribes text] 'Mine be a cot beside a hill...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

Thomas Campbell : The Last Man

'The Last Man by T. Campbell esq' [transcribes text] 'All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom...' Signed 'Fanny'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

Laetitia Elizabeth Landon : 'Change'

'Change' 'We say that people ... [transcribes text]'LEL'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

John Wolfe : The Burial of Sir John Moore

Pencil drawing of Sir John Moore by 'J.G.' followed by 'On the death of Sir John Moore' [transcribes text] 'Wolfe'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

John Clare : Early Rising

'Early Rising' 'Just at the early peep of dawn...' [transcribes text] 'Clare'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

Reginald Herber : Narrative of a journey through the upper Provinces

'If thou wast by mys side my love...' [transcript of poem] 'Hebers Journal'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

F. D. Hemans : The Graves of a Household

'Graves of a Household' [transcript of text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

Robert Hartley Cromek : Remains of Nithsdale and Galloway Song: with histo

'My Ain Fire Side' 'O I hae seen great ones...'[transcript of text] 'from the Nithsdale and Galloway Songs'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : Monody on the Death of the Right Honourable R.B. Sheridan

'Extract from Byron's Monody on the death of Sheridan' [transcript of text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

Lord George Gordon Byron : 'Sonnet on Chillon'

'Sonnet on Chillon' [transcript of text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

Walter Scott : The Lord of the Isles

'Autumn departs- but still his mantles fold...' [transcript of text] 'Introduction to the Lord of the Isles'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

Walter Scott : The Lord of the Isles

'Stranger! if e'er thine ardent...' [transcript of text] 'Lord of the Isles 14th Canto'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

 : Cheltenham Chronicle and Gloucester Advertiser

'To the Great Pyramid' 'Mountain of art!... [transcript of text] 'From the [Cheltenham] Chronicle Feb 7th 1833'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charles Swain : Song of the Bells

'Song of the Bells by Charles Swain'... 'Soft upon the summer air /...'[transcript of text] [NB there was a poet called Charles Swain who published from 1828-1850s].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

John Milton : Sonnet XIX When I consider how my light is spent

'Milton's Sonnet on his Blindness / 'When I consider how my light is spent...'[transcript of text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

 : Cheltenham Chronicle

'From The Cheltenham Chronicle of 11 Oct 1832 on the Death of Sir Walter Scott' ...'Harp of the North! the mighty hand /...[transcript of text].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Deveraux Bowly      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Annual Obituary

''Annual Obituray for 1833' [Prose passage on the Death of Sir Walter Scott]' [transcript of text].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Deveraux Bowly      Print: Serial / periodical

  

F.D. Hemans : The Homes of England

'The Homes of England' [transcribes text] 'Mrs Hemans'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Browne      

  

F.D. Hemans : Evening Prayer at a Girl's School

'Mrs Hemans. Evening Prayer at a girls school' [transcribes text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Browne      

  

F.D. Hemans : The Wings of the Dove

'The Wings of the Dove. Mrs Hemans' [transcribes text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Browne      

  

Robert Burns : Winter: A Dirge

'A Dirge- Burn' 'The sweeping blast, the sky o'ercast [transcribes alll of poem from l.10.]'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

Robert Burns : Despondency

'Despondency---Burn' 'Oppress'd with grief, oppress'd with care...' [transcribes poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

Robert Burns : Prayer Under the Pressure of Violent Anguish

'A Prayer by Burn' 'O thou great Being! What thou art, /...' [transcribes poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

Robert Burns : The Chevalier's Lament

'Burn. May 1812' 'The small birds rejoice in the green leaves returning /...' [transcribes poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

Cuthbert Shaw : Monody to the Memory of a Young Lady Who Died in C

'Shaw's Monody' 'I who the tedious absence of a day /...' [transcribes poem from line 11]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: B.A.T. Herbert      

  

Henry Kirke White : On Disapointment

'Ode on Disapointment' 'Come, Disapointment, come! /...' [No author given]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

George Crabbe : The Church

''Affecting picture of Constancy and Love' 'Yes! There are real mourners- I have seen /...' [transcription of 'The Church' from l.170 - 'While visions please her, and while woes destroy']

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

L.E. Landon : Love's Slaves

'Where is the heart that is not bow'd /...' 'L.E.L'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

L.E. Landon : Love's Last Lesson

'Loves Last Lesson' 'Teach me if you can- Forgetfulness!'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Rev. John Moultrie : Forget Thee?

'"Forget Thee?" By the Rev John Moultrie [transcript of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Felicia Dorothea Hemans : Fairy Favours

'Fairy Favours' [transcript of poem] 'Mrs Hemans'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Bernard Barton : The Heaven was Cloudless

'The Heaven was Cloudless' [transcript of poem, no author given]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Alaric A. Watts : Sketch From Real Life

'Sketch from Real Life / Alaric A. Watts' [transcript of poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

William Robert Spencer : To The Lady Anne Hamilton

'Verses / Spencer' 'Too late I staid, forgive the crime; /...' [transcript of poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Bernard Barton : Violets. A Sonnet

'Violets. a Sonnet / Bernard Barton' 'Beautiful are you in your lowliness/...[transcript of poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

William Law : A Practical Traetise Upon Christain Perfection

at home all day [...] at Oaks I met with Mr Laws practical discourse on christian perfection [...] I am now reading it

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Clegg      Print: Book

  

Sampson Perry : An Historical Sketch of the French Revolution

completed the perusal of the firstvolume of Perry's French Revolution, which requires to be read with care, the author a Democratic writer too often attempts to justify principles in themselves unjustifiable

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Sampson Perry : An Historical Sketch of the French Revolution

Continued the perusal of the 2nd volume which opens a display of the insubordination & cruelty of the French populace

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Sampson Perry : An Historical Sketch of the French Revolution

READING THE 2ND VOLUME OF PERRY'S FRENCH REVOLUTION

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Sampson Perry : An Historical Sketch of the French Revolution

Continue the perusal of Perry's French Revolution, which like the murmurings heard at the foot of the crater become more dreadful as we approach to its summit

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Sampson Perry : An Historical Sketch of the French Revolution

Still engaged in the perusal of Perry's French Revolution together with a few periodical publications by way of a change of its summit

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Sampson Perry : An Historical Sketch of the French Revolution

Continued Perry's French Revolution and read Cowper

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

William Cowper : 

Continued Perry's French Revolution and read Cowper

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Thomas James Mathias : The Pursuits of Literature; A Satirical Poem

Engaged in a 2nd perusal of the Pursuits of Literature and the Monthly Magazine

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

 : Monthly Magazine

Engaged in a 2nd perusal of The Pursuits of Literature and the Monthly Magazine

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Edgar Allan Poe : Tales Arabesque and Grotesque

'When I came home from the office where I worked, I went straight to my room, took out the cheap edition of "Tales Grotesque and Arabesque", and began to read.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Book

  

Baroness Anne Loiuse Germaine De Stael-Holstein : Germany

Read with much delight and instruction the Baroness De Stael's Germany

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Edgar Allan Poe : The Murders in the Rue Morgue

'I still remember my feelings when I finished "The Murders in the Rue Morgue". I was afraid, but this fear made me discover something I've never forgotten since: fear, you see, is an emotion people like to feel when they know they are safe.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Book

  

Charles Rollin : Ancient History of the Egyptians

Continue the perusal of Rollins Ancient History- this work reflects great light upon the sacred volume.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Robert Southey : Life of Wesley

Read Southey's Life of Wesley and ingenious but by no means faithful production

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

 : Motion Picture Daily

'There used to be a bookshop just off Leicester Square, near the Leicester Galleries, and upstairs they had all kinds of American trade magazines...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Motion Picture Herald

'There used to be a bookshop just off Leicester Square, near the Leicester Galleries, and upstairs they had all kinds of American trade magazines...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Cinematograph Lantern Weekly

'There used to be a bookshop just off Leicester Square, near the Leicester Galleries, and upstairs they had all kinds of American trade magazines...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : The Bioscope

'There used to be a bookshop just off Leicester Square, near the Leicester Galleries, and upstairs they had all kinds of American trade magazines...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Gustav Flaubert : Madame Bovary

[Spoto states that Hitchcock read Flaubert when he was around 15 or 16 and] 'He afterwards admitted that his favourite character in fiction was Emma Bovary.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Book

  

Marie Corelli : The Sorrows of Satan

[Spoto states that Hitchcock read Marie Corelli's "The Sorrows of Satan" in 1920/21 in preparation for helping to make a film of it which was afterwards abandoned.]

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Hitchcock      Print: Book

  

Caesar : Commentaries On The Gallic War

'In the spring of 1826, after getting through Valpy's Delectus, and a part of Stewart's "Cornelius Nepos, " and also a part of Justin, but somewhat clumsily, with the help of Ainsworth's Dictionary, I commenced Caesar, and sped on well, so that by the time I had reached the third book, "De Bello Gallico, " I found myself able to read page after page, with scarcely more than a glance, now and then, at the dictionary. I remember wll myfirst triumphant feeling of this kind. I sat on Ping

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Xenophon : Memorabilia

"In Lincoln, I now took up the Memorabilia of Xenophon..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Anacreon : Odes of Anacreon

"In Lincoln, I now took up the Memorabilia of Xenophon, ran through the Odes of Anacreon, ..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Iliad

In Lincoln, I now took up the Memorabilia of Xenophon, ran through the odes of Anacreon, and then commenced the Iliad. I worked hard at Greek.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Voltaire : Charles the Twelfth

"Under his instruction -while we read together part of Voltaire's 'Charles the Twelfth' and 'Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme' of Moliere - I caught hold of such good French pronunciation as would have enabled me soon to converse very pleasantly in the language, could I have found acompanion"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Moliere : Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme

"Under his instruction - while we read together part of Voltaire's 'Charles the Twelfth' and Moliere's 'Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme' - I caught hold of such good French pronunciation as would have enabled me soon to converse very pleasantly in the language, could I have found a companion."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Goldoni : Comedies

"As I thought I could easily learn Italian, I took lessons from Signor D'Albrione... So we read together part one of the comedies of Goldoni...."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Tasso : Gerusalemme Liberata

So we read together ... a part of the beautiful "Gerusalemme Liberata", of Tasso, in that most beautiful tongue.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Herder : [volume of tales]

I was soon able to make my way in a volume of tales by Herder, Lessing , and others. My school prospered for I took care to attend to its duties assiduously; and yet kept firm hold of my studies, rising early in the morning, and, with my book in my hand, as of old, walked from our little home in St. Mary's Street, along the Sincil Dyke, and on to Canwick Common, whenever weather permitted me to do so.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Lessing : [volume of tales]

I was soon able to make my way in a volume of tales by Herder, Lessing , and others. My school prospered for I took care to attend to its duties assiduously; and yet kept firm hold of my studies, rising early in the morning, and, with my book in my hand, as of old, walked from our little home in St. Mary's Street, along the Sincil Dyke, and on to Canwick Common, whenever weather permitted me to do so.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

 : The Times

there is a leading article in the "Times" about New Zealand

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Newspaper

  

Samuel Maunder : The Treasury of Geography

I am reading "Maunders Treasury of Geography" a very entertaining work.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Charles Tomlinson : Introduction to the Study of Natural Philosophy

"I have been reading lately "Natural Philosophy" by Tomlinson and Sir John Herschel, and am now reading the "Chemistry of Creation" by Dr Ellis."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Charles Dickens : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

John Herschel : A preliminary discourse on the study of Natural Ph

"I have been reading lately 'Natural Philosophy' by Tomlinson and Sir John Herschel, and am now reading the 'Chemistry of Creation' by Dr Ellis."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

William Makepeace Thackeray : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Robert Ellis : The Chemistry of Creation: being an outline of the

"I have been reading lately 'Natural Philosophy' by Tomlinson and Sir John Herschel, and am now reading the 'Chemistry of Creation' by Dr Ellis."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Charles and Mary Lamb : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

George Eliot : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Alfred Tennyson : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Unknown

  

George Gordon Noel, Lord Byron : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Samuel Maunder : The Treasury of Geography

I have been reading lately "Maunders Geography" and working a little at "Thompson's Natural Philosophy["]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Benjamin Disraeli : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Benjamin Thompson : Philosophical Papers: being a collection of memoir

I have been reading lately "Maunders Geography" and working a little at "Thompson's Natural Philosophy["]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

 : Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine

Reading Tales from Blackwood, and "The Court Servant" (Leigh Hunt)

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Makepeace Thackeray : Vanity Fair

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Leigh Hunt : The Court Servant

Reading Tales from Blackwood, and "The Court Servant" (Leigh Hunt)

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Samuel Lover : Rory O'More

Have just finished "Rory O'More" by Samuel Lover

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Julia Kavanagh : Nathalie

Read "Nathalie" by Julia Kavanagh

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Alfred Tennyson : Locksley Hall

'My eldest brother was one day making disparaging remarks about Tennyson. My mother, all agitated in defence of her idol, fetched his poems from the shelf, and with a "Listen now, children" began to declaim "Locksley Hall". When she reached "I to herd with narrow foreheads" she burst out, flinging down the book, "What awful rubbish this is!"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Thomas      Print: Book

  

 : unknown

I find by the newspapers this morning that Dr Wild and you are deputed by the clergy assembled at the late visitation at Beaconsfield to wait upon my lord Nottingham

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Lincoln      Print: Newspaper

  

Daniel (Earl of Winchelsea and Nottingham) Finch : The Answer of the Earl of Nottingham to Mr Whiston

I find by the news papers this morning that dr wild and you are deputed by the clergy assembled at the late visitation at Beaconsfield to wait upon my lord Nottingham [to give] their thanks for his book agst Mr Whiston. Which book i do also much approve of and accordingly Did return my own thanks to his lordship in the House of Lords as soon as it was published

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Lincoln      Print: Book

  

Hans Christian Anderson : 

'Charles was reading Hans Andersen: I wanted the book, asked for it, fussed for it, and finally broke into tears.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Thomas      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

Did not go to church. Read a funeral sermon of Dr Stanhope's.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : Bible (Old Testament), the

'mother would summon me to her side and open an enormous Bible. It was invariably at the Old Testament, and I had to read aloud the strange doings of the Patriarchs. No comments were made, religious or otherwise, my questions were fobbed off...and occasionally mother's pencil, with which she guided me to the words, would travel rapidly over several verses, and I heard a muttered "never mind about that".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

David Lewis : Philip of Macedon: A Tragedy. As it is acted at th

Bought... sugar at Cossen's, 2 vols of Dr Clark's exposition of the 4 Evengellists (cost 10s), sermons by Dr Stanhope. Cost 5s. Mother paid half of that... Read Philip of Macedon after supper. Does not read as well as I expected.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : 

'My English history was derived from a small book in small print that dealt with the characters of the kings at some length.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Penelope Aubin : The Strange Adventure of the Count de Vinevil and

After dinner, summerhouse, read the Life of Count Venivill - silly.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : A Child's History of Rome

'Not as a lesson, but for sheer pleasure, did I browse in "A Child's History of Rome", a book full of good stories.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Richard Baker : A Chronicle of the Kings of England from the Time

No rest for me in bed, therefore rise 1/2 past 4... summerhouse till 1/2 past 7 read Baker's Chronicles

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Dr Brewer : Guide to Science

'For scientific notions I had Dr. Brewer's "Guide to Science", in the form of a catechism.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

I know not why but too late for Church. Read 1 hour in the summerhouse, Dr Clark on the Evengelists.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Jonathan Swift : A Tale of A Tub

Sup'd by myself in own chamber. Read 'Tale of a Tub'. Bed 11...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : Rosy's Voyage Around the World

'Of course I had a shelf for my books..."Rosy's Voyage Around the World" was prime favourite.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Richard Baker : A Chronicle of the Kings of England

I left the old woman with mother as soon as supper was done. Read Baker's Chronicles 1 1/2 hours. Bed at 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : The Little Gypsy

'My own treasures are nearly all with me still, showing only the honourable marks of age and continual reading...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

Came home before 7. Dr Clark 1 hour. Bed past 10.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Lewis Carroll : Alice in Wonderland

'"Alice in Wonderland" we all knew practically by heart.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Eliza Fowler Haywood : The Perplex'd Dutchess: Or, Treachery Rewarded...

Sup'd alone. Read 'The Perplex'd Duches' a novell. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Lewis Carroll : Through the Looking Glass

'one of the red-letter days of my life was a birthday when I received from my father "Through the Looking Glass". I...buried myself in it all afternoon, my pleasure enhanced by the knowledge that there was a boring vistor downstairs to whom I ought to be making myself agreeable!'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Eliza Haywood : Memoirs of the Baron de Brosse, who was broke on t

Lay till 11. All day alone... Lay on the bed as much as I coud. Read 2 books of the Life of the Baron Debross, an old story.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : All for Love

Read some spectators in great anguish of mind. 'Im weary of my part My torch is out, and the world stands before me Like a black desart at th' approach of night I'll lay me down and stray no further on' (All for Love)

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : All for Love

"Is there yet left the least unmortgag'd hope" ('All for Love')

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Thomas Killigrew : Chit-Chat. A Comedy. As it is Acted at the Theatre

'tis in clearing one's charicter, as in taking spotts outof one's cloaths. You make it ten times bigger and seldom or never efface the first stains'. (Chit-Chat)

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

James Shirley : The Gratefull Servant. A Comedie...

Aunt sup'd with me. Read 4 Acts of 'The Gratefull Servant'. Bed 12. More amused and quiet than of late.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

Afternoon read a sermon of Dr Stanhope's. of Prayers not being granted immediately.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

Read one sermon and part of another of Dr Stanhope's of Death and Judgement, and of the sufficiency of the scriptures. I think he is a better orator than casuist: his argument is not so clear a stile.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

After dinner, garden 1 1/2 hours feeding the foul. Drank coffee. Made an end of the sermon.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

Read 2 sermons of Dr Stanhope's, one to sea men, the other on the 5th November.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

I sat in the Parlor; drank coffee and read a sermon of Dr Stanhope's...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

With mother to Clapham Common. Read to her 'Agnes de Castro' by Mrs Behn. Home before 8. Read one hour of the book before supper.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

Read part of 'Fair Gilt' by Mrs Behn.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

Read part of 'Oroonoko' after supper.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

Had a fire in my own Room. Mother sup'd with me there. Read 'The Lucky Mistake' - Mrs Behn.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Eachard : The Grounds and Occasion of the Contempt of the Cl

Read after supper the contempt of the clergy.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Eachard : The Grounds and Occasion of the Contempt of the Cl

Summerhouse reading 'contempt of the clergy' till 1/2 past 5.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Charles Sedley : The Mulberry Garden or The Works...In Two Volumes

Writt from 6 to 9. Sup'd alone. Read 'The Mulberry Garden', a pretty play. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Nathaniel Lee : Constantine The Great: A Tragedy. OR The Works...

'O heart, Why dost thou leap against my Bosom like a Cag'd Bird, and beat thyself to Death for an impossible freedom'. ('Constantine')

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Nathaniel Lee : Caesar Borgia. A Tragedy

Very miserable. 'Like a poor Lunitick that Makes his Moan And for a time beguiles the Lookers-On He reasons well, his Eyes their Wildness lose And vows the keepers his wrong'd sense abuse. But if you hitt the cause that hurts his Brain Then his Teeth gnash; he foams; he Shakes his Chain, His Eyeballs roll, and he is madagain'. (Lee, 'Caesar Borgia')

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

Home past 8 a fier in the Parlor. Read Mrs Behn's novels, a book of Abraham's [cut by editor].

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

With mother to Clapham Common. Read to her 'Agnes de Castro' by Mrs Behn. Home before 8. Read one hour of the book before supper.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Aphra Behn : All the Histories and Novels of the Late Ingenious

Made an end of the Novell [the Fair Jilt].

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Eachard : The Grounds and Occasion of the Contempt of the Cl

Summerhouse and garden till past 8, cutting shift neck and reading 'The Grounds of the Contempt of the Clergy' by Eachard; a book with much truth and much witt, but too ludicrase I think for the subject. It belongs to our [Quaker] Landlady.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Eachard : The Grounds and Occasion of the Contempt of the Cl

After dinner 1 hour reading 'Contempt of the Clergy'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : Travels of Cyrus

Mary read to me a little before dinner, (which she does tolerable); 'Cyrus' a Romance. I wound silk.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : ['Cyrus'] OR Travels of Cyrus

Lay till near 11. Mary read 'cyrus', I winding silk.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

 : Bible

None went to Church. Aunt gave us coffee. Mother read scriptures.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Barbara Savile      Print: Book

  

 : Church of England burial service

Monday 7th Buried poor Broome at 10 AM with all honours the General & staff attending the 40th [regiment] lending their Band - the Commodore was obliged to read the Burial Service as there was no Clergyman out here

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Frederick Beauchamp Paget Seymour      Print: Book

  

Jonathan Swift : A Tale of A Tub

Read 'Tale of Tub' 1 hour. Bed past 10.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Thomas Wotton : The English Baronets: Being a Genealogical and His

Brother and Lady Savile came at 5. Sup'd here and went near 11. Most of the time compareing the pedigree of the Saviles (in a book of the Baronets lately come out), with the account Brother sent to be inserted.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Double Falsehood; Or, the Distrest Lovers... writt

Read 'Double Falshood' a play of Shakespear's never acted till this winter. I think it a poor one for his. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Charles Beckingham : The Life of Mr Richard Savage

Supper alone. Read life of Mr Savage.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

(Sir) John Denham : The Sophy OR Poems and Translations

Sup'd alone. Read 'The Sophy', a play of Sir J Deham's.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Martin Luther : 

None went to Church. Read a book of Luther's.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Sturmy : Sesostris: Or, Royalty in Disguise. A Tragedy.

Read 'Sesostris, a new Tragydy'; a so-so one.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : Tatler

Din'd and sup'd with Aunt. Play'd Pickett till past 9. Read some Tatlers. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Samuel Clarke : A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God

Did not go to Church. Read Clark's Attributes morn.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Read 'The travells of Cyrus' after supper.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

(Sir) John Vanbrugh : A Journey to London, being part of a comedy...

Din'd in own room alone... Read 'A Journy to London', Sir J Vanburg's -part of what is made 'The Provoked Husband' by Cibber, vastly mended by him I think.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Gay : The Beggar's Opera

Play'd tunes in 'The Beggars Opera' 2 hours after dinner.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Home past 9. Supper alone, Read 'Cyrus', Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Rise at 10. Mary read 'Cyrus'. Knited [knitted] till 7.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Took Phisick. Rise at 10. Mary read Cyrus.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Took phisick. Mary read Cyrus.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

John Gay : The Beggars Opera

Tuned harpsichord and play'd some of Beggars Opera songs after supper alone.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Edward Young : A Vindication of Providence; Or, a True Estimate o

Read 'A True Estemate of Human Life' by Mr Young, a Sermon preach'd in St George's Church upon the King's death. Extreordinary stile. Poeticall, exceeding entertaining.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Edward Young : A Vindication of Providence; Or, a True Estimate o

Aunt had the coach at 5 to visit. I drank tea and read Mr Young's sermon. Mrs D'Enly went when the coach came back with Aunt near 10.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Gay : The Beggar's Opera

Mrs Newton, Lady Palmerston, Lady Clavering and 2 daughters (great fortunes), and 3 Mrs Fox's here. While the last 2 were here, and Mrs D'Enly alone in Mother's room, I read 'The Beggar's Opera' to them in intervals before and after supper.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God

Lay till past 9. Read Dr Clark little. Went to King Street chapel...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God

Mrs Prade set me down past 9. Read Dr Clark 1/2 hour after supper. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : Tatler

Supper alone. Tatlers. Bed past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Tatler

Supper alone. 4 Tatlers. Bed 1/2 past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Tatler

Home 9. Supper below. 3 Tatlers. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Tatler

Home past 9. Read 4 Tatlers. Bed past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Tatler

Home near 10. Read 4 Tatlers. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

(Sir) Richard Steele : The Conscious Lovers. A Comedy.

Went into the park...Back to our dinner at 2. Spent the afternoon walking and sitting, and I read 3 Acts of 'The Conscious Lovers'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Edward Young : The Universal Passion

Read the 'Universal Passion'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Edward Young : The Universal Passion

Made an end of 'The Unniversall Passion'... 'Tis exceeding seveer, 'tis all satir[e] but mighty pretty and too just. He is grown a favouritt Author of mine. I am not content with once reading it, but design to bye it.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : The Life and Actions of James Dalton (the noted st

Supper below. Read 'The Life, Roberies, etc. of Dalton', an evidence against several of the Robers which are to be Hang'd. Bed past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

'B.L' OR 'A Lady'  : Two Letters: one from a Lady to a friend who had m

Afternoon read Lady's Letter to a Popish Gentleman etc.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Eliza Haywood : The British Recluse; Or the Secret History of Cleo

Read 'The British Recluse'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

Afternoon went to the chaple. Home. Coffee. Read Clarke's 'Parraphras on the Evangellists'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

Read 'The Adventures of Six Days'. 1 hour. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

Read 'Six Days Adventures' after supper. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

'Adventures of Six Days' 1 hour after supper. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Jonathan Swift : Essay on the Fates of Clergymen

[Marginalia by Macaulay on Swift's "Essay on the Fates of Clergymen"]: 'People speak of the world as they find it. I have been more fortunate or prudent than Swift or Eugenio.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

Read 'Adventures of Six Days'. Bed 1.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Anon OR 'Ma. A' [Madame A]  : The Prude. A Novel... By a Young Lady.

Home near 9. Read 'The Prude' comfortably by a fire.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Anon OR 'M. A.' [Madame A]  : The Prude. A Novel... By a Young Lady.

Read 'The Prude'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Edward Gibbon : Vindication

Description of Marginalia by Macaulay on Edward Gibbon's 'Vindication' - the marginalia responds to the passage 'Fame is the motive, it is the reward, of our labours: nor can I easily comprehend how it is possible that we should remain cold and indifferent with regard to the attempts which are made to deprive us of the most valuable object of our possessions, or at least, of our hopes.' Macaulay writes: 'But what if you are confident that these attempts will be vain, and that your book will fix its own place?'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Anon OR 'Ma. A' [Madame A]  : The Prude. A Novel... By a Young Lady.

Tent till dark. Read the 3rd part of 'The Prude', and the 'The Beautifull Pyrate'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Jean Regnauld de Segrais : Three Novels; viz I. The Beautiful Pyrate.... OR F

Read... "The Beautifull Pyrate".

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Jean Regnauld de Segrais : Three Novels; viz I. The Beautiful Pyrate.... OR F

Tent all day light. Read Ugania [?] and Bajesett. Bed past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Conyers Middleton : Free Enquiry into the Miraculous Powers of the Christian Church

[Marginalia by Macaulay on Conyers Middleton's 'Free Enquiry into the Miraculous Powers of the Christian Church']: 'I do not at all admire this letter. Indeed Middleton should have counted the cost before he took his part. He never appears to so little advantage as when he complains in this way of the calumnies and invectives of the orthodox.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

 : [A Novell] OR [A Novel]

Read a Novell after supper. Bed past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : 'Brutus' OR 'A Tragedy'

Slept in the chair - knew not what to do with myself. Read a New Tragidy in Maniscript that has not been acted; the story of the first Brutus that putt his 2 sons to death.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Manuscript: Codex

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Marginalia by Macaulay on the first page of his copy of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"]: 'An admirable opening scene, whatever the French critics may say. It at once puts us thoroughly in possession of the state of the two families.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Marginalia by Macaulay by the passage about the biting of the thumbs in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"]: 'This is not what would be commonly called fine; but I would give any six plays of Rowe for it.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Marginalia by Macaulay by the scene in the street beginning with Mercutio's lines: 'Where the devil should this Romeo be? / Came he not home to- night?' in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"]: 'This is the free conversation of lively, high-spirited young gentlemen.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

 : 'Almanack' OR 'Almanick'

Mrs Winn told us our fortunes out of the Almanick, some things to me very strange...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: (Mrs) Winn      Print: Book, almanack

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Marginalia by Macaulay by the commencement of the third act in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"]: 'Mercutio, here, is beyond the reach of anybody but Shakespeare.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Marginalia by Macaulay by the the lines 'Some consequence, yet hanging in the stars, / Shall bitterly begin his fearful date / With this night's revels'in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"]: 'This is as fine an instance of presentiment as I remember in poetry. It throws a sadness over all the gaiety that follows, and prepares us for the catastrophe.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Marginalia by Macaulay at the close of the Third Act of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet"]: 'Very fine is the way in which Juliet at once withdraws her whole confidence from the nurse without disclosing her feelings'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Penelope Aubin : The Noble Slaves: Or, the Lives and Adventures of

Read after supper 'The Noble Slaves'. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Penelope Aubin : The Strange Adventures of the Count de Vinevil...

'Life of Count De Venivill' after supper. Bed near 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's marginalia]: 'When [...] the poor child commits her life to the hands of Friar Lawrence, Macaulay remarks on the wonderful genius with which the poet delineates a timid, delicate girl of fourteen excited and exalted to an act of desperate courage.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

'Young Nobleman'  : Nunnery Tales, Written by a Young Nobleman, and Tr

Tent till Dark. Read 'Nunnery Tales'. What a Stuped Life is my lott!...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

'Young Nobleman'  : Nunnery Tales, Written by a Young Nobleman, and Tr

Sat humdrum some time. Read a storry out of 'Nunnery Tales'. At 5 to Mrs Drydens...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Elijah Fenton : Mariamne. A Tragey. Acted at the Theatre Royal...

'Tis th' infirmity of noblest mind When ruffled with an unexpected woe To speak what settled prudence wou'd conceal: As the vex'd oceean [sic] working in a storm Off brings to light the wrecks which long lay calm, In the dark bosom of the secret deep. ('Mariamne')

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Sturmy : Sesostris: Or, Royalty in Disguise. A Tragedy...

Writt till supper. Read 'Sesostris'. Bed near 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Eliza Fowler Haywood : The City Widow; or, Love in a Butt. A Novel.

After supper read 'The City Widow' and part of the 'Adventures of Abdella' - 2 new books got tonight. Bed past 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Alain Rene Le Sage : The History and Adventures of Gil Blas...

Home past 9 almost starv'd to death...Read 'Gill Blas'. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Alain Rene Le Sage : The History and Adventures of Gil Blas...

Home near 11. 'Gil Blass'. Bed past 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Penelope Aubin : The Noble Slaves: or, The Lives and Adventures of

Home past 10. 'Noble Slaves'. Bed past 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Eliza Fowler Haywood : The Perplex'd Dutchess; or, Treachery Rewarded...A

News. Writt. After supper read 'The Perplex'd Dutches'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Alain Rene Le Sage : The History and Adventures of Gil Blas...

Made an end of 'Gil Blas'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : The Very Woman

Masenger - Believe ye are to blame, much to blame Lady; [...] That Feel a Weight of Sorrow through their Souls.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Nicholas Rowe : The Ambitious Step-Mother. A Tragedy...

I fear to tempt this stormy sea the World, Whose every Beach is strew'd with wrecks of wretches, That daily perish in it. - Rows Ambitious Stepmother

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God

Afternoon read Clarke's Attributes 2 hours.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

Would not go to Church. Read Dr Clark's 'paraphras'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George (Duke of Buckingham) Villiers : The Rehearsal

Read 4 acts of 'The Rehearsall'. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George (Duke of Buckingham) Villiers : The Rehearsal

Read an act of 'The Rehearsall' and one of 'All for Love'. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : All for Love: or, the World well lost. A tragedy..

Read an act of 'The Rehearsall' and one of 'All for Love'. Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

Some of Dr Clark's paraphras.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : All for Love: or, the World well lost. A tragedy..

Came up and din'd alone. Writt little. Read 'All for Love'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : All for Love: or, the World well lost. A tragedy..

Din'd alone in own room. Read part of 'All for Love'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

I sat with Aunt till 7. Read Dr Clark's 'Paraphras' 1 1/2 hours.Bed near 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Read 'travells of Cyrus' alone 2 1/2 hours. A fine book. Bed near 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Samuel Clarke : A Paraphrase on the Four Evangelists

Did not go to Church morn. nor afternoon. Read Dr Clark paraphras.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

 : Tatler

Tatlers (borrow'd of Mrs Helen D'Enly) 1 1/2 hours.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Samuel Clarke : A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God

None went to Church. Read Clark's 'Attributes' and writt.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Thomas Jevon : The Devil of a Wife

Read 2 plays after supper - 'The Guardian' and 'The Devil of a Wife'. Bed 1.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Abraham Cowley : The Guardian: A Comedy Acted before Prince Charles

Read 2 plays after supper - 'The Guardian' and 'The Devil of a Wife'. Bed 1.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

Read part of a sermon of Dr Stanhope's.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

George Stanhope : Twelve Sermons

Read a sermon of Dr Stanhope's to the sons of the clergy. Bed past 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Robert Dodsley : The Economy of Human Life

I took up the Economy of Human Life, and was much pleased with the simplicity, ease and elegance of its style. The Biographical Sketch of Dodsley is drawn with much beauty and taste.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

Allan Ramsay : The Gentle Shepherd

I finished Allan Ramsay's "Gentle Shepherd", and with some parts have been much pleased - the Scotch is interesting to me from not being acquainted with it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

 : The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal

Looked through a volume of the Edinburgh Philosophical Journal - read an account of Gordon's Portable Gas Lamp, and of the tides of the Mediterranean. At Venice they...

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

James Boswell : The Life of Samuel Johnson

Commenced Boswell's Life of Johnson and was much pleased with it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

James Boswell : The Life of Samuel Johnson

Dined at five - went on with Boswell having discontinued it, since Saturday January 23rd.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : Peveril of the Peak

Wholesome dinners produce haviness and ill humour commenced Peveril of the Peak.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : Peveril of the Peak

Finished Peveril of the Peak.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

 : The Story without an End

'The story itself was an allegory, and was too subtle for us, but it is impossible to describe the endless pleasure given us by those full-page pictures.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : 

'It was entirely due to its colour that another book became my constant companion. This was an illustrated Scripture text-book, given to me on my seventh birthday, and still preserved...some of the little pictures are very crude, but most of them, especially such short commands as "Walk Honestly, "Fear God"...are tasteful enough.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : The Safe Compass

'Some of the boys' prizes fell into my keeping, handed to me in disgust. One of these, "The Safe Compass", afforded me many a joyful hour. It took the gloomiest views as to the fate of the disobedient. But if you left out everything that was in italics, and altered the endings of the plots, the stories were good.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : The Peep of the Day

'Many people of my age must have imbibed their early religious notions from the same book that I did.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

'There is a pencil note in his copy of "Paradise Lost": "Had to write 500 lines of this for being caught reading "King Lear" in class."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Tom Thomas      Print: Book

  

 : [French play]

'Some three or four times during the reading of the French play...Charles ... neatly, but with becoming hesitation, spouted the Latin line.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Thomas      Print: Book

  

 : 

'I was placed in the lowest class with three other little girls of my own age, who were reading aloud the story of Richard Arkwright.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : Little Arthur

'My new history book was "Little Arthur", which one could read like a delightful story.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : The Tempest

'We spent a whole term on the first two scenes of "The Tempest".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Margaret Oliphant : The Lover and his Lass

'My dear Mrs Oliphant, - I cannot help venturing to express the admiration with which I have been reading the "Lover and his Lass." It is by your powerful, truth-seeing imagination, and not by what pedants are prone to describe as "analysis" of character, that you enchant us [...] I "pitied myself," as they say in Cumberland, when I got to the end of the book.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alexander Kinglake      Print: Book

  

George MacDonald : David Elginbrod

[Editorial commentary by Annie Coghill, Mrs Oliphant's cousin] 'George Macdonald's first book, or at any rate his first successful book, "David Elginbrod", had been published many years before by Messrs Hurst & Blackett, at Mrs Oliphant's warm recommendation. She always spoke of it as a work of genius, and quoted it as one of the instances of publishers' blunders, for when the MS. came to her it came enveloped in wrappings that showed how many refusals it had already suffered.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Manuscript: MS of a book

  

John Morley : Life of George Eliot

'Thank you very much for the "Life of George Eliot," and for the kind and flattering inscription. I am very glad to have the book, which is as curious a book as any I ever saw. The personality of the great writer is as yet very confusing to me in the extreme flatness of the picture. I don't mean by flatness dulness [sic], though there is something of that, but only that it is like mural paintings or sculpture in very low relief. I have just run over your reviewer's article and think it very good.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

 : Review of the Life of George Eliot

'Thank you very much for the "Life of George Eliot," and for the kind and flattering inscription. I am very glad to have the book, which is as curious a book as any I ever saw. The personality of the great writer is as yet very confusing to me in the extreme flatness of the picture. I don't mean by flatness dulness [sic], though there is something of that, but only that it is like mural paintings or sculpture in very low relief. I have just run over your reviewer's article and think it very good.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Laurence Oliphant : Land of Gilead, The

'Laurence Oliphant's sketches of the Druse villages are delightful, but his philosophy is something too tremendous. I am making the most prodigious effort to understand his book, but I have to catch hold of the furniture after a few pages to keep myself from turning round and round, and yet the absorption of such a man of the world as he is in a religious idea has something very fine in it.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

 : Athenaeum

'I see by the "Athenaeum" that the Magazine is to be enlarged'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Blackwood's Magazine

'Thanks for the old numbers; they are very interesting, and what vigour in them! - but one could not speak so strongly now.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Blackwood's Magazine

'It seems an excellent number, with the exception of the short story, which is not up to "Maga's" mark. The article on Hayward is very good. Sir Edward Hamley, I think?'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Margaret Oliphant : Makers of Venice

'The first opinion I have heard of it [the "Makers of Venice"] is Mr Gladstone's, to whom Mr Macmillan sent it, and who sent back to him at once a letter of four pages saying, first, that he was not going to Venice, as had been reported; and next, that he must contradict himself, and say that he had been in Venice, the book having quite given him that feeling; after which he enters into a question of Venetian political history about Bajamonte, whose very name, I should think, was unknown to most readers, but with whom this amazing old man seems intimately acquainted.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Ewart Gladstone      Print: Book

  

A.K.H. Boyd : Taking in Sail

'I have just been reading your paper about "Taking in Sail". I think I have told you before how much I feel with and sympathise in your afternoon musings - the subdued thoughts that come to us with the decline of the day.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Unknown

  

J.M. Barrie : Auld Licht Idylls

'I don't at all know the books you refer to - I have not seen any of them. Mr Barrie's "Auld Licht Idylls," etc, I think exceedingly clever. Indeed there seems to me genius in them, though the Scotch is, as you say, much too provincial.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Margaret Oliphant : The Duke's Daughter

Dear Mrs Oliphant, - It is with ceaseless admiration that I have read 'The Duke's Daughter'. My remembrance of what you had told me respecting the origin of your inclination to undertake the narrative put me into the mood for studying it, if so one may speak, instead of too placidly 'reading' your delightful pages, and the effect of this special care was such as to make me think more - more even than ever before - of what - distinguished from 'fancy' - I should call that sound, healthy, that strong Imagination of yours which tells you, and lets you tell others, the very, very truth.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: A.W. Kinglake      Print: Book, Unknown

  

Margaret Oliphant : In Trust

Some little time since, I had the good fortune to find that there was at least one [one in italics] of your delightful books which I had missed - I mean 'In Trust' - and I am only now towards the end of the second volume. I am greatly interested, and more than ever admiring the way in which your powerful yet truth-loving imagination proves able to deal with the mazes of Human Nature.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: A.W. Kinglake      Print: Book, Unknown

  

 : Blackwood's Magazine

I don't feel quite sure with the last paper whether it is in earnest or not, or if your contributor means to make fun of Macdonald, who is often a noble writer, but not, I think, according to these specimens, in poetry.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical, Unknown

  

Margaret Oliphant : Jerusalem: Its History and Hope

I have begun the perusal, and I very much hope, and cannot doubt, that your living portraitures of Scripture characters will impress upon many minds an important portion of those evidences of the sacred volume which are so much higher than the "higher criticism", and which have a range of flight beyond its reach.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Ewart Gladstone      Print: Book, Unknown

  

 : [a paper on the Poor Laws in Austria]

I had half a mind, on reading a paper about the Poor Laws in Austria in your Magazine, to send you a sketch of Dr Chalmers's great experiment in Glasgow, which I think a very fine thing indeed, and which has fallen out of recollection.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Newspaper, Unknown

  

A.P. Stanley : A Selection from the writings of Dean Stanley

I have done nothing but wade through Dean Stanley's Life this last week in the intervals of doing perfunctorily a little work in the mornings.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

 : Blackwood's Magazine

I have several times intended to speak of the very great vigour and fresh start which the Magazine seems to me to have taken during the last year. It has been more full of interesting articles, and altogether stronger than for a long time before.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Andrew Lang : Life of Lockhart

Mr Lang sent me several chapters to read in the early summer, which I thought were rather dull - tell it not in Gath - with much virtuous indignation about 'Maga's' personalities.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Serial / periodicalManuscript: MS chapters of a book

  

Marie Corelli : 

I suppose there was no man who had a greater command of the public in his day [than Bulwer Lytton]. To be sure, one might say the same of Miss Marie Corelli, who, by the way in the only book of hers I can read, seems to be founded upon Bulwer

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

 : Crossing the Bar

One afternoon, very near the end, she begged to have "Crossing the Bar" read; and while the reader, painfully keeping her voice steady, repeated the last lines, the listener fell suddenly into a calm sleep."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Annie Coghill      Print: Book

  

 : The Iris

The Iris came this morning, in it there was the following article: at Paris there is proposals for publishing by subscription Parisgraphy, or a language that may be read by any nation... I have not copied this exactlyas it is in the newspaper, but that is the substance.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Monthly Review

I wrote out of the Monthly Review, an anecdote of Dr Franklin's [surgeon?] who said that the [king?] was the only gentleman in the kingdom. I began to make an index to this journal.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Gentleman's Magazine

I wrote out of the Gentleman's Magazine the various [games?] assigned for the 9 of diamonds... to which I added my opinion on the subject.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : 'An old Hymn Book'

I will here give an account of the Hymns which I could say ... This I have copied from Mr E[vans] writing in an old hymn book of mine.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

William Seward : Anecdotes of Some Distinguished Persons, Chiefly o

Reading "Anedotes of Some Remarkable Persons Chiefly of The Present and Two Preceding Centuries'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Mark Noble : A Genealogical History of the Present Royal Famili

I drew out of a book entitled 'a genealogical History of the Present Royal Families of Europe' the pedigree of several of them.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Robert Ainsworth : Robert Ainsworth's Dictionary

Looked at Ainsworth's dictionary for the derivation of all the Christian names; Joseph is derived from the Hebrew of I will multiply ...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

William Cobbett : Advice to Young Men, and, incidentally, to Young W

'I had read in Cobbett's "Advice to Young Men" a caution not to depend upon the Muses for substantial support ... he illustrated the sufferings of Bloomfield ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Teer      Print: Book

  

William Cobbett : A French Grammar, Or plain Instructions for the Le

Upon on of the interminable book-stalls, or rather book-walls, which display their leafy banners along the quays of the seine, I picked up a Cobbett's French Grammar for a Franc and a pocket dictionary for another. A fellow lodger lent me a Testament and a Telemaque, and to these materials I applied doggedly from six in the morningtill dinner time. I read the grammer through first, and then made an abridgement of it on a small pack of plain cards ...

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Manby Smith      Print: Book

  

Richard Westall : A Day in Spring, and Other Poems

Have you seen a little volume of Westall's Poems containing a DAY in SPRING, and other detached pieces, with four lovely engravings from his own designs? One of them representing ayouthful Spenser, dreaming about knights, and squires, & Dames of high degree, and Fairies, & other entertaining whimsies. And all these visionary personages are dancing around him in the prettiest groupes you can imagine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Book

  

William Mitford : The History of Greece

I have been steadily & delightedly reading Mitford's History. First of all, he is an Historian after my own heart, and I really believe a perfectly upright & honest man [...] the merit of this history is great, in proving that bad as the world is now, even under Christian regulations, it is not nationally anywhere so bad as it was in Pagan Greece - except during the height and fury of the French Revolution - and still and ever perhaps inTurkey.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Book

  

Marie-Emilie, Comtesse de Flahaut Adelaide : Eugenie et Mathilde

Let us talk of Eugenie and Mathilde. It saddened but did not make me cry. I foresaw it would end like a Turk, nay I am not sure I did not peep, for I cannot bear to be graduallyworked up into an agony by these dismal stories... I shall not desire to look into it again...

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Book

  

Hester Lynch Piozzi : Anecdotes of the Late Samuel Johnson

I wanted to have sent you a translation of the Epigram Flahaut has introduced in her book. It is Johnson's, and inserted in Piozzi's anecdotes - but my father has lent, & lost (often synomymous terms) his copy of that work, & I cannot immediately think of anybody to apply to. There are no bookish people here - on the contrary, they seem to me to look with an evil eye on every reader of every production save a newspaper.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Book

  

Marquis of Chatele, Paul Hay : The Politics of France

Volume annotated in Dawson's own hand. Includes correction to Preface and a contents list.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Dawson      Print: Book

  

Nathan Bailey : Universal Etymological Dictionary

Manuscript list of 'The Proverbs & c in this Book' (in Dawson's hand) has been bound into the rear of the book.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Dawson      Print: Book

  

William Camden : Britannia: or, a Chorographical Description of Gre

Contains a contents list, index to illustrations, index to maps and cross references to other texts in his library.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Dawson      Print: Book

  

 : The Historical Register

Two volumes bound together by Dawson and including his 'The Pages Where the affairs in this Book begin for 1723' and 'continued for 1724'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Dawson      Print: Book

  

Laetitia Landon : When Should Lovers Breathe Their Vows?

Accurate transcript of complete text, probably from The Improvisatrice.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Laetitia Landon : The Soldier's Grave

Transcript of poem partially obscured by later use of the manuscript as a scrapbook. Probably copied from The Improvisatrice.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

William Cowper : The Task, Book IV

I never framed a wish or formed a plan that flattered mewith hopes of earthly bliss. But thou wert there. [rewriting of lines 695-697 of Book IV]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Thomas Moore : Whene'er I see Those Smiling Eyes

To Jane Whene'er I see those smiling eyes... [the 'transcript' does not follow the original to the letter]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Walter Scott : Rokeby

'From Rokeby' 'The tear that down childhood's cheek...' [4lines]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Arthur Murphy : The Grecian Daughter

'Extract from Murphy's Grecian Daughter' 'Filial Affection'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Mary Masters : To Marinda at Parting

May heavenly Angels their soft wings display And guide you safe thro' ev'ry dangerous way In every step may you most happy be And tho far distant often think of me [some differences from the original]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sophia      

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'I knew, I knew it could not last...' [transcript (exact) of lines 277-294]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'Oh! Had wenever met/...' [transcript of lines 384-387]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Gotthilf Heinrich von Schubert : Allgemeine Naturgeschichte

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling : Zeitschrift fur speculative Physik

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gotthilf Heinrich von Schubert : Ansichten von der Nachtseite der Naturwissenschaft

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Walter Scott : Novels and Tales of the Author of Waverley

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Walter Scott : Historical Romances of the Author of Waverley

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gotthilf Heinrich von Schubert : Die Symbolik des Traumes

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Walter Scott : Novels and Romances of the Author of Waverley

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry Scougal : The Life of God in the Soul of Man OR The Nature a

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Walter Scott : Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Charles Scudamore : A Chemical and Medical Report of the Properties of

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The Life of John Buncle

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry Augustus Zwick : Calmuc Tartary

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Edwin Atherstone : The Last Days of Herculaneum; and Abradates and Pa

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John and Michael Banim : Tales by the O'Hara Family

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Pietro Metastasio : Opere

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Richard Baxter : Reliquiae Baxteriana

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Leighton : The Genuine Works of R Leighton, D.D. Archbishop o

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : La danse des morts

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Immanuel Kant : Vermischte Schriften

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Declaration of Principles

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottfried Herder : Verstand und Erfahrung

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry Augustus Dillon-Lee : The Life and Opinions of Sir Richard Maltravers, a

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Haslam : Medical Jurisprudence as it relates to Insanity, a

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Samouelle : The Entomologist's Useful Compendium

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Plays [various]

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Joseph Beaumont : Some Observations upon the Apologie of Dr Henry More

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Oliver Cromwell : His Highnesse the Lord Protector's speeches to the Parliament in the Painted Chamber

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Tindal : The History and Antiquities of the Abbey and Borough of Evesham

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

James MacPherson : The Poems of Ossian, the Son of Fingal

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost: a poem in twelve books

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Adam Weishaupt : Pythagoras

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Hewitt : [conjecture] Nine Select Sermons

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Ekkehart : De prima expeditione Attilae

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Plays

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Burton : The Anatomy of Melancholy

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry Augustus Dillon-Lee : The Life and Opinions of Sir Richard Maltravers

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Dunbar : The Poems of William Dunbar

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Hugh Farmer : A Dissertation on Miracles

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[n/a] : A New Version of the Psalms of David

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Rachel Baker : Remarkable Sermons of Rachel Baker and pious ejaculations

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Aristaenetus : Epistolae graecae

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Ludwig Tieck : Phantasus

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Ludwig Heinrich Christoph Holty : Gedichte

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Edward Thomas Stanley Hornby : Childhood (?)

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Paul de Rapin-Thoyras : The History of England

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Heinrich Rimius : A Candid Narrative of the Rise and Progress of the Herrnhunters

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Daniel Sennert : [unknown]

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Giovanni Boccaccio : Opere (vols I-IV (of 6))

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Immanuel Kant : Vermischte Schriften (vols I-III (of 4))

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[n/a] : The Parliamentary Debates from the Year 1803

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

 : Apocalypsis graece Vol II (of 2)

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Dante Alighieri : [Divina Commedia]

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johannes Cocceius : Opera omnia theologica

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Chillingworth : The Works

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Chillingworth : The Works

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gilbert Burnet : History of His Own Time

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gilbert Burnet : The History of the Reformation of the Church of En

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry Peter Brougham : A Speech on the Present State of the Law of the Country

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Immanuel Kant : Vermischte Schriften (vol II (of 4))

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Donne : LXXX Sermons

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Donne : LXXX Sermons

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottfried Eichhorn : Einleitung in das Neue Testament

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottfried Eichhorn : Einleitung in das Neue Testament

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottfried Eichhorn : Commentarius in Apocalypsin Joannis

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottfried Eichhorn : Commentarius in Apocalypsin Joannis

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Christopher Harvey : The Synagogue, or, the Shadow of the Temple

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Christopher Harvey : The Synagogue, or, the Shadow of the Temple

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Herbert : The Temple and sacred poems and private ejaculations

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Herbert : The Temple and sacred poems and private ejaculations

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Abraham Cowley : The Works of Mr Abraham Cowley

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Charles Dallison : The Royalist's Defence

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Charles Bowker Ash : Adbaston: or Days of Youth

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The Life of John Buncle, Esq

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Paul Friedrich Richter : Palingenesien von Jean Paul

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Paul Friedrich Richter : Museum von Jean Paul

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Martin Luther : Samptliche Schrifften

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Wordsworth : Benjamin the Waggoner

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Plato : The Cratylus, Phaedo, Parmenides and Timaeus of Pl

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Christoph Friedrich Nicolai : Ueber meine gelehrte Bildung

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Blaise Pascal : Les Provinciales

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gometius Pereira : Antoniana margarita, opus nempe physicis medicis

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Adam Weishaupt : Ueber Wahrheit und sittliche Vollkommenheit

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Albert Heinrich Reimarus : Ueber die Grunde der menschlichen Erkentniss und der nat?rlichen Religion

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Xenophon : Xenophon's Memoirs of Socrates, with the defence o

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Wilhelm Gottlieb Tennemann : Geschichte der Philosophie

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Sammlung vorzuglich schoner Gedichte...

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Kasper Lodewijk Valckenaer : Diatribe de Aristobulo Judaeo

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Henry Vane the Younger : A Healing Question Propounded and Resolved

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[n/a] : The Quarterly Journal of Foreign Medicine and Surgery

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Robert Vaughan : The Life and Opinions of John de Wycliffe, D.D.

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Francois Rabelais : The Works of Francis Rabelais

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Walter Raleigh : The History of the World

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Vincent : The Greek Verb Analysed. An Hypothesis

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Randolph : Poems

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire : A Treatise on Toleration

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gerardus Joannes Vossius : Poeticarum Institutionum, libri tres

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Edward Gibbon Wakefield : A letter from Sydney, the principal town of Australia

[Marginalia]

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Walker : A Dictionary of the English Language

[Marginalia]

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

James Relly : The Believer's Treasury

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Wall : A Conference between Two Men that had Doubts about Infant-Baptism

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Benn Walsh : On the Present Balance of Parties in the State

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Benn Walsh : Popular Opinions on Parliamentary Reform

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Reynolds : The Triumphes of God's Revenge against the Cryinge

[Marginalia]

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jacob Rhenferd : Opera philologica, dissertationibus exquisitissimi argumenti constantia

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Daniel Waterland : The Importance of the Doctrine of the Holy Trinity

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Paul Friedrich Richter : Jean Pauls Geist oder Chrestomathie der vorzuglich

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Daniel Waterland : A Vindication of Christ's Divinity

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Paul Friedrich Richter : Das Kampaner Thal oder uber die Unsterblichkeit de

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Daniel Sandford : The Remains of the Late Right Reverend Daniel Sandford

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Whitaker : The Origin of Arianism Disclosed

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jacopo Sannazaro : Jacobi Sannazarii, patricii neapolitani, opera

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Carl Von Savigny : Of the Vocation of our Age for Legislation and Jurisprudence

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gilbert White : The Works, in Natural History

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Joannes Scapula : Joan. Scapulae Lexicon Graeco-Latinum

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Whitfield : A Discourse of Liberty of Conscience...

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling : Darlegung des wahren Verhaltnisses der Naturphilosphe

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Christoph Martin Wieland : Comische Erzahlungen

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling : Denkmal der Schrift von den gottlichen Dingen

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling : Einleitung zu seinem Entwurf eines Systems der Naturphilosophie

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling : Ideen zu einer Philosophie der Natur

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling : Philosophie und Religion

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Anderson : The Works of the British Poets

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Anderson : The Works of the British Poets

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Karl Leonhard Reinhold : Versuch einer neueren Theorie des menschlichen Vorstellungsverm?

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Christoph Martin Wieland : Wielands Neueste Gedichte

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Publius Virgilius Maro : Georgica Publii Virgilii Maronis Hexaglotta

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

August Wilhelm Rehberg : Ueber das Verhaltniss der Metaphysik zu der Religion

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Bateman : A Practical Synopsis of Cutaneous Diseases

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Berkeley : Siris: a chain of philosophical reflexions

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[n/a] : The Holy Bible

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

Macaulay's marginalia, by the lines 'Now, afore God, this reverend holy friar/ All our whole city is much bound to him' in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: "Warburton proposed to read 'hymn' for 'him'; - the most ludicrous emendation ever suggested".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

[n/a] : The Apocryphal New Testament

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

Macaulay's marginalia by the speech about Queen Mab in Romeo and Juliet: "This speech, - full of matter, of thought, of fancy, as it is, - seems to me, like much of this play, to be not in Shakspeare's [sic] very best manner. It is stuck on like one of Horace's 'purple patches'. It does not seem to spring naturally out of the conversation. This is a fault which, in his finest works, Shakspeare [sic] never commits."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Walter Birch : A Sermon on the Prevalence of Infidelity and Enthusiasm

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

Macaulay's marginalia by the lines 'Hath Romeo slain himself' to 'Of those eyes shut, that make thee answer "I"' : "If this had been in Cibber, Cibber would never have heard the last of it."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

George Dyer : Academic Unity

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Dyer : Poems

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

Macaulay's marginalia by the point where Balthazar brings the evil tidings to Mantua in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: "Here begins a noble series of scenes. I know nothing grander than the way in which Romeo hears the news. It moves me even more than Lear's agonies."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Lucy Hutchinson : Memoirs of the Life of Colonel [John] Hutchinson

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

Macaulay's marginalia in the scene in the vault of death in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: "The desperate calmness of Romeo is sublime beyond expression; and the manner in which he is softened into tenderness when he sees the body of Juliet is perhaps the most affecting touch in all poetry."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Samuel Parr : A spital sermon preached at Christ Church

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Strype : The History of the Life and Acts of the most Reverend Father in God

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Abraham Parsons : Travels in Asia and Africa

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, by the opening dialogue: "beyond praise".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

John Strype : Memorials of the Most Reverend Father in God, Thomas Cranmer

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, by the lines 'that season comes/ Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated" : "Sweet writing".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

John Strype : Memorials of the Most Reverend Father in God, Thomas Cranmer

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Caspar Suicerus : Joh. Caspari Suiceri...Thesaurus Ecclesiasticus

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, "The long story about Fortinbras, and all that follows from it, seems to me to be a clumsy addition to the plot".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Giuseppe Luca Pasini : Vocabolario Italiano-Latino per uso degli studiosi

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, in the scene of the royal audience in the room of state: "The silence of Hamlet during the earlier part of this scene is very fine, but not equal to the silence of Prometheus and Cassandra in the Prometheus and Agammemnon of Aeschylus."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Christian Franz Paullini : Christiani Francisci Paullini disquisitio curiosa

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Pearson : An Exposition of the Creed

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : The Wisdom of Angels concerning Divine Love and Divine Wisdom

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, by the scene with the strolling player's declamation about Pyrrhus: "the only thing deserving of much admiration in the speech is the manner in which it is raised above the ordinary diction which surrounds it. It is poetry within poetry, - a play within a play. It was therefore proper to make its language bear the same relation to the language, in which Hamlet and Horatio talk, which the language of Hamlet and Horatio bears to the common style of conversation among gentlemen. This is a sufficient defence of the style, which is undoubtedly in itself far too turgid for dramatic, or even for lyric, composition."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : True Christian Religion

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : De coelo et ejus mirabilibus, et de inferno

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : De cultu et amore Dei

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, at the opening of Act 1, Scene 4: "Nothing can be finer than this specimen of Hamlet's peculiar character. His intellect is out of all proportion to his will or his passions. Under the most exciting circumstances, while expecting every moment to see the ghost of his father rise before him, he goes on discussing questions of morals, manners, or politics, as if he were in the schools of Wittenberg."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : De equo albo de quo in Apocalypsi

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : De equo albo de quo in Apocalypsi

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, by the lines 'Dost thou hear?/ Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice,/ And could of men distinguish, her election/ Hath sealed thee for herself, - ' : "An exquisitely beautiful scene. It always moved me more than any other in the play. There is something very striking in the way in which Hamlet, a man of a gentle nature, quick in speculation, morbidly sluggish in action, unfit to struggle with the real evils of life, and finding himself plunged into the midst of them, - delights to repose on the strong mind of a man who had been severely tried, and who had learned stoicism from experience. There is wonderful truth in this."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : Oeconomia regni animalis, in transactiones divisa

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : Oeconomia regni animalis, in transactiones divisa

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Percival : An Account of the Island of Ceylon

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Hamlet, by the conversation between Hamlet and the courtier, in Act 5: "This is a most admirable scene. The fooling of Osric is nothing; but it is most striking to see how completely Hamlet forgets his father, his mistress, the terrible duty imposed upon him, the imminent danger which he has to run, as soon as a subject of observation comes before him; - as soon as a good butt is offered to his wit."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Thomas Percy : Reliques of Ancient English Poetry

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia. By an editorial note by Dr Johnson, to the lines, 'Who would fardels bear, / To groan and sweat under a weary life'. Johnson wrote, "All the old copies have to 'grunt and sweat'. It is undoubtedly the true reading, but can scarcely be borne by modern ears." Macaulay writes: "We want Shakespeare, not your fine modern English."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Isaac Taylor : Natural History of Enthusiasm

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia. By the editorial notes in his copy of Hamlet: "It is a noble emendation. Had Warburton often hit off such corrections, he would be entitled to the first place among critics."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Francesco Petrarca (Petrarch) : Le Rime di Francesco Petrarca

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jeremy Taylor : The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Alaric Alexander Watts : Poetical Sketches

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Hamlet

Macaulay's marginalia by the editorial notes in his copy of Hamlet in the scene where Hamlet declines to kill his uncle in the act of praying. Johnson comments that the speech in which, "not content with taking blood for blood, he contrived damnation for his enemy, was too horrible to be read or uttered." Macaulay responds: "Johnson does not understand the character. Hamlet is irresolute; and he makes the first excuse that suggests itself for not striking. If he had met the King drunk, he would have refrained from avenging himself lest he should kill both soul and body."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, in Act 1, Scene 3: "Here begins the finest of all human performances."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, in Act 2, Scene 2, opposite Cornwall's description of the fellow who has been praised for bluntness: "Excellent! It is worth while to compare these moral speeches of Shakspeare [sic] with those which are so much admired in Euripides. The superiority of Shakspeare's [sic] observations is immense. But the dramatic art with which they are introduced, - always in the right place, - always from the right person, - is still more admirable."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, by the lines 'Now i pr'ythee, daughter, do not make me mad!/ I will not trouble thee, my child; farewell!' : "This last struggle between rage and tenderness is, I think, unequalled in poetry."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, by the apostrophe commencing, 'O, let not women's weapons, water-drops...' : "Where is there anything like this in the world"?

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, by opening of the play: "Idolising Shakspeare [sic] as I do, I cannot but feel that the whole scene is very unnatural. He took it, to be sure, from an old story. What miracles his genius has brought out from materials so unpromising!"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, by the quarrel between Kent and Cornwall's steward: "It is rather a fault in the play, to my thinking, that Kent should behave so very insolently in this scene. A man of his rank and sense would have had more self-command and dignity even in his anger. One can hardly blame Cornwall for putting him in the stocks."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of King Lear, in Act 3, Scene 4: "The softening of Lear's nature and manners, under the discipline of severe sorrow, is mot happily marked in several places."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : King Lear

Macaulay's marginalia in response to a note by Dr Johnson at the end of King Lear. Johnson protested against the unpleasing character of a story, "in which the wicked prosper, and the virtuous miscarry." Macaulay responds: "There is nothing like this last scene in the world. Johnson talks nonsense. Torn to pieces as Lear's heart had been, was he to live happily ever after, as the story-books say? Wonderful as the whole play is, this last passage is the triumph of Shakspeare's [sic] genius. Every character is perfectly supported."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

John Petvin : Letters Concerning Mind

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jeremy Taylor : The Rules and Exercises of Holy Living

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Esaias Tegner : Die Frithiofs-Sage

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Antony and Cleopatra

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Antony and Cleopatra. A response to an editorial note by Steevens. "Solemn nonsense! Had Shakspeare [ sic] no eyes to see the sky with?"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Lord Alfred Tennyson : Poems, Chiefly Lyrical

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Saint Teresa  : Works

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Nicolaus Tetens : Philosophische Versuche

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Gaisford : Poetae Minores Graeci

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jean de Thevenot : The Travels of Monsieur de Thevenot

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir John Pringle : Observations on the Diseases of the Army

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Pringle : African Sketches

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Ludwig Tieck : The Old Man of the Mountain, The Lovecharm

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Bryan Waller Procter : Dramatic Scenes and Other Poems

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Samuel Pepys : Memoirs of Samuel Pepys, Esq

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Taylor : An Essay on Money

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jeremy Taylor : The Worthy Communicant, a discourse on the nature, effects and blessings consequent to the worthy receiving of the Lord's supper

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jeremy Taylor : The Worthy Communicant, a discourse on the nature, effects and blessings consquent to the worthy receiving of the Lord's supper

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Plotinus Plotinus : Plotini Platonicorum facile coryphaei operum philosophie

[Marginalia]

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Proclus Proclus : The Philosophical and Mathematical Commentaries

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Charles Tennyson : Sonnets and Fugitive Pieces, by Charles Tennyson

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Aulus Persius Flaccus : Auli Persi Flacci Satirarum liber

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Henry V

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Henry V, by the Prologue. Macaulay responds to an editorial note by Dr Johnson, who remarks that to call a circle an O was a very mean metaphor. Macaulay responds: "Surely, if O were really the usual name of a circle there would be nothing mean in it, any more than in the Delta of the Nile."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Emanuel Swedenborg : Regnum animale anatomice, physice et philosophice

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : A Midsummer Night's Dream

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of A Midsummer Night's Dream, by Warburton's editorial note to the lines 'Now the hungry lions roar, / And the wolf beholds the moon'. Macaulay writes: "In my opinion, this is one of Warburton's very best corrections."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : A Midsummer Night's Dream

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of A Midsummer Night's Dream, by the lines 'the rattling tongue / Of saucy and audacious eloquence': This is Shakspeare's [sic] manly sense and knowledge of the world, introduced with perfect dramatic propriety. How different from Euripides's lectures on such subjects."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : A Midsummer Night's Dream

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of A Midsummer Night's Dream, by the lines 'Be, as thou wast wont to be' to 'Hath such force and blessed power": "Beautiful and easy beyond expression".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : A Midsummer Night's Dream

Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of A Midsummer Night's Dream, on the last page: "A glorious play. The love-scenes Fletcher might perhaps have written. The fairy scenes no man but one since the world began could have written."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

St John Chrysostom : Commentary on the Ephesians

I read some of Chrysostom's commentary on the Ephesians. I am getting tired of this commentary. Such underground dark passages before you get at anything worth standing to look at! Very eloquent sometimes: but such a monotony & lengthiness! Sunday is not a reading day with me. Driving to church, driving back again, driving to chapel, driving back again - & prayers three times at home besides! All that fills up the day, except the few interstices between the intersections.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : 

Read as I have done lately, not for the pleasure of thinking: but for the comfort of not thinking.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      

  

 : Bible

Read, as I do every day, seven chapters of Scripture. My heart & mind are not affected by this exercise as they should be ? witness what I have written today. I would erase every line of it, could I annihilate the feelings, together with the descriptions of them; but, since I cannot, let the description pass!

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : 

Very busy today. Reading Aeschylus & learning the verb τύπτω.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Bible

Read the Bible, & Horne on its critical study. I do not think enough of the love of God, graciously as it has been manifested to me.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Annual Anthology

'W[ordsworth] received a copy [of the Annual Anthology] in Aug. [1799], and discussed it in his letter to [Joseph] Cottle of 2 Sept.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : Annual Register

"In Feb. 1834, W[ordsworth] remembered having first read Crabbe in the Annual Register during the 1780s; there he also read Beattie's 'Illustrations on Sublimity.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Horne : 

Read the Bible, & Horne on its critical study. I do not think enough of the love of God, graciously as it has been manifested to me.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : [prayers]

Bro [Barrett's eldest brother, Edward Barrett Moulton-Barrett] read prayers. Afterwards he read Lord John Russell?s speech on Reform, in the midst of which, I who am interested in reform & admire Lord John Russell, fell fast asleep. My politics were not strong enough to keep my eyes open.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Moulton-Barrett      Print: Book

  

John Russell : [Speech on Reform]

Bro [Barrett's eldest brother, Edward Barrett Moulton-Barrett] read prayers. Afterwards he read Lord John Russell?s speech on Reform, in the midst of which, I who am interested in reform & admire Lord John Russell, fell fast asleep. My politics were not strong enough to keep my eyes open.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Moulton-Barrett      

  

Homer : unknown

We [Barrett and Hugh Stuart Boyd] talked comparatively about Homer, Aeschylus & Shakespeare: and positively about Aeschylus's Prometheus ? Praises of the speech in the Medea.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : unknown

We [Barrett and Hugh Stuart Boyd] talked comparatively about Homer, Aeschylus & Shakespeare: and positively about Aeschylus's Prometheus ? Praises of the speech in the Medea.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : Prometheus

We [Barrett and Hugh Stuart Boyd] talked comparatively about Homer, Aeschylus & Shakespeare: and positively about Aeschylus's Prometheus ? Praises of the speech in the Medea.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Euripides : Medea

We [Barrett and Hugh Stuart Boyd] talked comparatively about Homer, Aeschylus & Shakespeare: and positively about Aeschylus's Prometheus ? Praises of the speech in the Medea.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : unknown

We [Barrett and Hugh Stuart Boyd] talked comparatively about Homer, Aeschylus & Shakespeare: and positively about Aeschylus's Prometheus ? Praises of the speech in the Medea.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Ludovico Ariosto : Orlando Furioso

'"My Sister would be very glad of your assistance in her Italian studies," W[ordsworth] wrote to [William] Mathews on 21 March 1796, " ... yesterday we began Ariosto."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William and Dorothy Wordsworth     Print: Book

  

Ann Radcliffe : Mysteries of Udolpho

'And besides she [Mrs Cliffe] wd. lend me the first two vols of the mysteries of Udolpho before she had finished them herself ? a kind of generosity which quite dazzled my weak moral sense. I have read the mysteries; but am anxious to read them again ? being a worshipper of Mrs. Radcliffe.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Ann Radcliffe : Mysteries of Udolpho

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Cyclopaedia

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Victor Hugo : 

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Lamartine : 

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Lamartine : Childe Harold

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

James Beattie : Minstrel, The

'W[ordsworth] was introduced to The Minstrel by his teacher, Thomas Bowman ... during his schooldays at Hawkshead. De Selincourt emphasizes its influence on the juvenilia [quotes Minstrel I st.32 lines 3-8 featuring "clanking chain," and "owl's terrific song," and Wordsworth's uses of these features in The Vale of Esthwaite (1787)]'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Beddoes : Domiciliary Verses

'W[ordsworth] did not read it [Thomas Beddoes, Domiciliary Verses] until it was reprinted in the Annual Anthology (1799). [Joseph] Cottle sent W[ordsworth] a copy ... in Aug. 1799, and on 2 Sept he wrote back: "Pray give yourself no uneasiness about Dr Beddoes's verses [which parodied the Lyrical Ballads] ... it is a very harmless performance."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Bell : Bell's Classical Arrangement of Fugitive Poetry

'W[ordsworth] asked [William] Mathews in Oct. 1795 to "make me a present of that vol: of Bells forgotten poetry which contains The Minstrel and Sir martyn" ... [he]included an extract from [William Julius Mickle's] Sir Martyn in the Album he compiled for Lady Mary Lowther in 1819 ... '

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : The Bible

"In the Fenwick Note to the Intimations Ode, W[ordsworth] recalled that at school 'I used to brood over the stories of Enoch and Elijah' ... the Hawkshead schoolboys regularly attended Church, and were catechized at least once a week."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Homer : 

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth      Print: Book

  

Zenophon [Xenophon] : unknown

'Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth      Print: Book

  

Euripides : 

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Marcus Antoninus : 

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Callimachus : 

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Anthologia

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Epictetus : 

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Isocrates : 

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Leonardo Da Vinci : [Painting]

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Giovanni Boccaccio : Il Decamerone

"[William and Dorothy Wordsworth] probably read [the Decameron] together as he tutored her in Italian [1796] ... " This "consistent" with W[ordsworth]'s remark in Nov. 1805 to Walter Scott (followed by reference to Fourth "Day" of the Decameron): "'It is many years since I saw Boccae ...' Later in the letter W[ordsworth] quotes Boccacio from memory, showing that he knew the Decameron well."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William and Dorothy Wordsworth     Print: Book

  

Susan Ferrier : Destiny

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Susan Ferrier : The Inheritance

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Euripides : Alcestis

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Euripides : Alcestis

I liked my solitude, even tho? I had no one to say so to - & in spite of La Bruy?re & Cowper! ? Nearly finished the Alcestis. I will finish it tomorrow, before breakfast

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Antoninus : 

They did not return until past nine; & I meanwhile was hard at work at Antoninus. Finished his 5th book ? read 7 chap: in the Bible, & then went out to walk in the dark.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Bible

They did not return until past nine; & I meanwhile was hard at work at Antoninus. Finished his 5th book ? read 7 chap: in the Bible, & then went out to walk in the dark.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

William Lisle Bowles : Fourteen Sonnets

'At some point after 1828, W[ordsworth] told Alexander Dyce that he read Bowles's Fourteen Sonnets on publication: "When Bowles's Sonnets first appeared, - a thin 4to pamphlet, entitled Fourteen Sonnets, - I bought them in a walk through London with my dear brother, who was afterwards drowned at sea."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Henry Brooke : The Fool of Quality; or, the History of Henry Earl of Moreland

"On 7 March 1796 D[orothy] W[ordsworth] remarked that 'I am now reading the Fool of Quality which amuses me exceedingly.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Daniel Defoe : Robinson Crusoe

[Permitted Sunday reading for the children of the family]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Marcus Antoninus : 

I read half the 6th book of Antoninus today ? so I can?t say, after all, perdidi diem [I have lost a day].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Thomas Hughes : Tom Brown

[Permitted Sunday reading for the children of the family]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Hans Christian Andersen : Tales

[Permitted Sunday reading for the children of the family].

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Marcus Antoninus : 

I read the other half of Antoninus?s sixth book, - & half his seventh, besides. What a creature I am ? to spend my time in this way, between philosophy & folly. Anoninus wd. not be well pleased, if he could know whom he has for a reader!

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

John Bunyan : Pilgrim's Progress, The

[Permitted Sunday reading for the children of the family].

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Marcus Antoninus : 

On Wednesday before breakfast, I read the beginning of Antoninus?s 10th. book, & I went on with it today, but not the end. My energies felt dead within me: & how could I do anything without them? Nothing but reading the 3d. vol: of Mrs. Shelley, which I despatched in two hours ? (which did come at last!! - ) No going out today. Marcus Antoninus after Mrs. Shelly [sic], and drinking tea after Marcus.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Good Words for the Young

[Permitted Sunday reading for the children of the family].

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Serial / periodical, Bound volumes

  

Mary Shelley : The Last Man

On Wednesday before breakfast, I read the beginning of Antoninus?s 10th. book, & I went on with it today, but not the end. My energies felt dead within me: & how could I do anything without them? Nothing but reading the 3d. vol: of Mrs. Shelley, which I despatched in two hours ? (which did come at last!! - ) No going out today. Marcus Antoninus after Mrs. Shelly [sic], and drinking tea after Marcus.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Marcus Antoninus : 

On Wednesday before breakfast, I read the beginning of Antoninus?s 10th. book, & I went on with it today, but not the end. My energies felt dead within me: & how could I do anything without them? Nothing but reading the 3d. vol: of Mrs. Shelley, which I despatched in two hours ? (which did come at last!! - ) No going out today. Marcus Antoninus after Mrs. Shelly [sic], and drinking tea after Marcus.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : The Dark Journey

'Again and again I turned to something entitled "The Dark Journey", only to find it was an account of one's digestion. You may wonder why I did this more than once, but I always hoped that I had been mistaken, and that such a splendid title must mean a good story.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Serial / periodical, Bound volumes of a periodical

  

Cebes : Dialogue

Solved my doubts, & read half Cebes?s dialogue before I went to bed. It is rather a pleasing than a profound performance, - & on this account as well as on account of the extreme facility of the Greek, it can bear fast reading.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Henry Milner

'We all liked certain parts of a three-volume story called "Henry Milner"...I believe he never did anything wrong, but his school-fellows did, and all their gay activities shone like misdeeds in a pious world.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

John Keats : Lamia

I finished Keats?s Lamia, Isabella, Eve of St Agnes & Hyperion, before breakfast. The three first disappointed me. The extracts I had seen of them, were undeniably the finest things in them. But there is some surprising poetry ? poetry of wonderful grandeur, in the Hyperion. The effect of the appearance of Hyperion, among the ruined Titans, is surpassingly fine. Poor poor Keats. His name shall be in my ?Poets Record.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

John Keats : Isabella

I finished Keats?s Lamia, Isabella, Eve of St Agnes & Hyperion, before breakfast. The three first disappointed me. The extracts I had seen of them, were undeniably the finest things in them. But there is some surprising poetry ? poetry of wonderful grandeur, in the Hyperion. The effect of the appearance of Hyperion, among the ruined Titans, is surpassingly fine. Poor poor Keats. His name shall be in my ?Poets Record.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

John Keats : Eve of St Agnes

I finished Keats?s Lamia, Isabella, Eve of St Agnes & Hyperion, before breakfast. The three first disappointed me. The extracts I had seen of them, were undeniably the finest things in them. But there is some surprising poetry ? poetry of wonderful grandeur, in the Hyperion. The effect of the appearance of Hyperion, among the ruined Titans, is surpassingly fine. Poor poor Keats. His name shall be in my ?Poets Record.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

John Keats : Hyperion

I finished Keats?s Lamia, Isabella, Eve of St Agnes & Hyperion, before breakfast. The three first disappointed me. The extracts I had seen of them, were undeniably the finest things in them. But there is some surprising poetry ? poetry of wonderful grandeur, in the Hyperion. The effect of the appearance of Hyperion, among the ruined Titans, is surpassingly fine. Poor poor Keats. His name shall be in my ?Poets Record.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

John Keats : Endymion

I finished the Endymion today. I do not admire it as a fine poem; but I do admire many passages of it, as being very fine poetry. As a whole, it is cumbrous & unwieldy. You don?t know where to put it. Your imagination is confused by it: & your feelings uninterested. And yet a poet wrote it. When I had done with Keats, I took up Theophrastus. Theophrastus has a great deal of vivacity, & power of portraiture about him; & uplifts that veil of distance ? veiling the old Greeks with such sublime mistiness; & shows you how they used to spit & take physic & wear nailed shoes tout comme un autre?Theophrastus does me no good just now: & as I can?t laugh with him, I shall be glad when I have done hearing him laugh.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Theophrastus : 

I finished the Endymion today. I do not admire it as a fine poem; but I do admire many passages of it, as being very fine poetry. As a whole, it is cumbrous & unwieldy. You don?t know where to put it. Your imagination is confused by it: & your feelings uninterested. And yet a poet wrote it. When I had done with Keats, I took up Theophrastus. Theophrastus has a great deal of vivacity, & power of portraiture about him; & uplifts that veil of distance ? veiling the old Greeks with such sublime mistiness; & shows you how they used to spit & take physic & wear nailed shoes tout comme un autre?Theophrastus does me no good just now: & as I can?t laugh with him, I shall be glad when I have done hearing him laugh.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : Revolt of Islam

Read some passages from Shelley?s Revolt of Islam before I was up. He is a great poet; but we acknowledge him to be a great poet as we acknowledge Spenser to be so, & do not love him for it. He resembles Spenser in one thing, & one thing only, that his poetry is too immaterial for our sympathies to enclasp it firmly. It reverses the lot of human plants: its roots are in the air, not earth! ? But as I read him on, I may reverse this opinion.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Goldoni : Pamela

I am tired, & have been resting my body in my arm chair, & my mind in Goldoni. Read his Pamela, & Pamela Maritata. The merit of the first, is Richardson?s; & there is not much in the second, for anybody to claim!

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Goldoni : Pamela Maritata

I am tired, & have been resting my body in my arm chair, & my mind in Goldoni. Read his Pamela, & Pamela Maritata. The merit of the first, is Richardson?s; & there is not much in the second, for anybody to claim!

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Bible

I read parts of scripture with reference to the Calvinistic controversy, & little else today. I am going thro? all the epistles, marking with my pencil every expression that seems to glance at or against the doctrine of particular exclusive election.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Bible

Comparing scripture with scripture. Reading besides Self control [by Mary Brunton] which Henrietta has borrowed from Mrs. Martin. It is formed on the model of Clarissa Harlowe; but the heroine is more immaculate than even Clarissa, & more happy finally! ? The book is well-written & interesting. A combination of fortitude & delicacy always interests me in a particular manner.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Bible, The (Book of Esther)

'One day when Barnholt was desperate for a new story I recommended Esther as being as good as the "Arabian Knights"...he...seized the Bible, and soon became absorbed in the plot.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Barnholt Thomas      Print: Book

  

Mary Brunton : Self Control

Comparing scripture with scripture. Reading besides Self control [by Mary Brunton] which Henrietta has borrowed from Mrs. Martin. It is formed on the model of Clarissa Harlowe; but the heroine is more immaculate than even Clarissa, & more happy finally! ? The book is well-written & interesting. A combination of fortitude & delicacy always interests me in a particular manner.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Beverley : Letter to the Archbishop of York

I read Mr. Beverley?s pamphlets which Mr. Boyd had lent to me; the letter to the Archbishop of York, & the Tombs of the prophets. ? They are clever & forcible; coarse enough, & in some places too highly colored. For instance, I do not believe that the body of the established clergy are as much opposed to the reading of the scriptures, as the papistical clergy are; and I do know instances of members of that body, refusing the sacrament to persons of immoral character?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      

  

Beverley : Tombs of the Prophets

I read Mr. Beverley?s pamphlets which Mr. Boyd had lent to me; the letter to the Archbishop of York, & the Tombs of the prophets. ? They are clever & forcible; coarse enough, & in some places too highly colored. For instance, I do not believe that the body of the established clergy are as much opposed to the reading of the scriptures, as the papistical clergy are; and I do know instances of members of that body, refusing the sacrament to persons of immoral character?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      

  

Dr Card : Discourse

I have finished Dr. Clark?s Discourse. It is very clever: but as all metaphysical discourses on scriptural subjects, must be, - seeking only to convince the human reason, it is unconvincing. At least this is true of one or two material parts, where even I have detected fallacies. Dr. Card?s sermon on the Athanasian creed, is bound up in the same volume; & I have read it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Card : Sermon on the Athanasian Creed

I have finished Dr. Clark?s Discourse. It is very clever: but as all metaphysical discourses on scriptural subjects, must be, - seeking only to convince the human reason, it is unconvincing. At least this is true of one or two material parts, where even I have detected fallacies. Dr. Card?s sermon on the Athanasian creed, is bound up in the same volume; & I have read it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Channing : On the importance & means of a national Literature

Mrs. Martin lent me Dr. Channing?s treatise ?On the importance & means of a national Literature?, & I ought to be grateful to her. I have been reading it this morning. It is a very admirable, & lucidly & energetically written production. The style is less graceful than powerful. Indeed it has so much strength, that the muscles are by necessity, rather too obvious & prominent. But its writer is obviously & prominently an extraordinary man.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Jessica's First Prayer

'The question of conscience once arose when mother was reading "Jessica's First Prayer" aloud to Barnholt and me.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Unknown

  

 : Lloyd's Weekly

'How horrified my father was on discovering that the servants had been reading little bits to me out of "Lloyd's Weekly" [on a Sunday].'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Newspaper

  

William Shakespeare : 

'After tea...[on a Sunday, my father]...liked to read aloud to us from books that sounded quite well, but afforded some chance of frivolity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Molly Vivian      Print: Book

  

Richard Harris Barham : The Ingoldsby Legends

'After tea...[on a Sunday, my father]...liked to read aloud to us from books that sounded quite well, but afforded some chance of frivolity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Molly Vivian      Print: Book

  

 : The Misadventures at Margate

'After tea...[on a Sunday, my father]...liked to read aloud to us from books that sounded quite well, but afforded some chance of frivolity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Molly Vivian      Print: Unknown

  

Charles Dickens : The Pickwick Papers

'After tea...[on a Sunday, my father]...liked to read aloud to us from books that sounded quite well, but afforded some chance of frivolity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

'After tea...[on a Sunday, my father]...liked to read aloud to us from books that sounded quite well, but afforded some chance of frivolity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book, Unknown

  

Aunt Lizzie  : Persons for Whom our Prayers are Requested

'Charles...seized the list [of prayers for the redemption of sinners] hopefully, and hooted with delight when he found: "For a family of four boys and one girl [namely his own family]."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Thomas      Print: Serial / periodical, Religious magazine with blank pages for individual prayers

  

 : The Narrow Way

'I concluded that no one could really be as good as this book wanted and that it was a fearful waste of time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : 

'Among the treasures we rooted out...were an illustrated Prayer Book, gone quite brown with age and damp. When tired of reading we could get laughter out of its absurd pictures.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

John Foxe : Book of Martyrs

'Foxe's "Book of Martyrs" was another feast for us.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Unknown

  

Robert Michael Ballantyne : The Iron Horse

'Surely no book was ever read and re-read and talked over as that first new volume, although we went on to buy many more.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : March Winds and April Showers bring forth May Flowers

'I can still remember the deep interest I took in a long serial story.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Cassell's Family Magazine

'Cassell's Magazine provided stronger meat...and I think every word of it found some reader in the family.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Jules Verne : Journey to the Centre of the Earth

'he saw me one day deep in "A Journey to the Interior of the Earth" [sic].'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : Iphigenia in Aulide

Getting on with Iphigenia [in Aulide] I am very much interested in it ? particularly in the scene between Iphigenia & her father. How much simple affectionate nature there is in her character! The opposition between her?s, & Clytemnestra?s stately dignity, is skilfully conceived.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Gregory : Apologetick

We [EB & Mr Boyd] read passages from Gregory?s apologetick, - comparing his marks with mine, in different copies, - & came to the conclusion, that our tastes certainly do agree!! And so they do.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

 : Hippolytus

Finished the Hippolytus, - & began the Supllices of Aeschylus. I read a part of it before; but I have left off now my partial habits of reading.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : Supplices

Finished the Hippolytus, - & began the Supllices of Aeschylus. I read a part of it before; but I have left off now my partial habits of reading.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : Choephori

Finished the Choephori, & began the Eumenides. Read more than 500 lines of Greek, & was more tired by them than by the 800 the other day, because I met with more difficulties.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Aeschylus : Eumenides

Finished the Choephori, & began the Eumenides. Read more than 500 lines of Greek, & was more tired by them than by the 800 the other day, because I met with more difficulties.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Joseph Clarke : Sacred Literature

I read yesterday in Mr. Joseph Clarke?s Sacred Literature, that Nonnus is an author whom few can read, & fewer admire. So that my opinion is nothing outrageous. I do not feel well; & look like a ghost.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Synesius : Poems

Finished not only the whole of Synesius?s poems, but four odes of Gregory, contained in the same little volume. And yet I really read nothing superficially. There is a great deal in Synesius which is very fine. He stands on a much higher step than Gregory does, as a poet; tho? occasional diffuseness is the fault of each. I like the 7th. hymn extremely. A slip of paper in the first leaf, tells me that in Mr. Boyd?s opinion the 1st. 5th. & 6th. are perhaps the finest, next to the 9th. I wd. lay a very strong emphasis on perhaps. The 9th. is, I agree with him, decidedly the finest.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Gregory : Odes

Finished not only the whole of Synesius?s poems, but four odes of Gregory, contained in the same little volume. And yet I really read nothing superficially. There is a great deal in Synesius which is very fine. He stands on a much higher step than Gregory does, as a poet; tho? occasional diffuseness is the fault of each. I like the 7th. hymn extremely. A slip of paper in the first leaf, tells me that in Mr. Boyd?s opinion the 1st. 5th. & 6th. are perhaps the finest, next to the 9th. I wd. lay a very strong emphasis on perhaps. The 9th. is, I agree with him, decidedly the finest.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Gregory : Odes

Finished not only the whole of Synesius?s poems, but four odes of Gregory, contained in the same little volume. And yet I really read nothing superficially. There is a great deal in Synesius which is very fine. He stands on a much higher step than Gregory does, as a poet; tho? occasional diffuseness is the fault of each. I like the 7th. hymn extremely. A slip of paper in the first leaf, tells me that in Mr. Boyd?s opinion the 1st. 5th. & 6th. are perhaps the finest, next to the 9th. I wd. lay a very strong emphasis on perhaps. The 9th. is, I agree with him, decidedly the finest.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Stuart Boyd      Print: Book

  

Synesius : Poems

Finished not only the whole of Synesius?s poems, but four odes of Gregory, contained in the same little volume. And yet I really read nothing superficially. There is a great deal in Synesius which is very fine. He stands on a much higher step than Gregory does, as a poet; tho? occasional diffuseness is the fault of each. I like the 7th. hymn extremely. A slip of paper in the first leaf, tells me that in Mr. Boyd?s opinion the 1st. 5th. & 6th. are perhaps the finest, next to the 9th. I wd. lay a very strong emphasis on perhaps. The 9th. is, I agree with him, decidedly the finest.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Stuart Boyd      Print: Book

  

Thomas Paine : The Age of Reason

'Uriah Plant, a wheelwright's son, affirmed that "My uncertainty about the truth of religion not only increased my sense of its importance... but gave me a habit of thinking, a love of reading, and a desire after knowledge"... he organized a discussion group devoted to religion and, over six years spent "only" ?21 10s. 9d. on books, mostly secondhand. He fearlessly read across the spectrum of theological opinion, including The Age of Reason'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Uriah Plant      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'At age thirteen John Clare was shown The Seasons by a Methodist weaver and though he had no real experience of poetry, he was immediately enthralled by Thomson's evocation of spring'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

John Bunyan : Pilgrim's Progress

'The mother of Joseph Wright, the millworker-philologist, did not learn to read until age forty-eight, and then apparently never ventured beyond the New Testament, Pilgrim's Progress and a translation of Klopstock's Messiah'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: mother of Joseph Wright      Print: Book

  

 : New Testament

'The mother of Joseph Wright, the millworker-philologist, did not learn to read until age forty-eight, and then apparently never ventured beyond the New Testament, Pilgrim's Progress and a translation of Klopstock's Messiah'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: mother of Joseph Wright      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Klopstock : Messiah

'The mother of Joseph Wright, the millworker-philologist, did not learn to read until age forty-eight, and then apparently never ventured beyond the New Testament, Pilgrim's Progress and a translation of Klopstock's Messiah'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: mother of Joseph Wright      Print: Book

  

 : The Heir of Redclyffe

'Wedding-bells were the usual end to our stories, of which "The Heir of Redclyffe" was a fair sample. Needless to say I had no notion of any difficulties after the bells had pealed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Unknown

  

William Makepeace Thackeray : Vanity Fair

1"Vanity Fair" I read without the faintest suspicion of the intent of the note in the bouquet, or of Rawdon's reason for knocking down Lord Steyne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Bronte : Jane Eyre

'One winter evening I was sitting over the fire engrossed in "Jane Eyre"...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

William Gladstone : 

'I struggled through one [essay/article] by Gladstone just, in order to be able to say I had, but honestly I understood no single sentence.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Shakespeare : 

'Christopher Thomson was a "zealous" Methodist until he discovered Shakespeare, Miilton, Sterne and Dr Johnson at a circulating library. When his absence from Sunday chapel was noticed, "I was called to account for it; by way of defence I pleaded my desire for, and indulgence in, reading. This appeared rather to aggravate than serve my cause. It was evidently their opinion, that all books, except such as they deemed religious ones, ought not be read by young men. I ventured somewhat timidly to hint, that it was possible for a young man to read novels, and other works of fiction, and still keep his mind free from irreligion and vice...".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'Christopher Thomson was a "zealous" Methodist until he discovered Shakespeare, Miilton, Sterne and Dr Johnson at a circulating library. When his absence from Sunday chapel was noticed, "I was called to account for it; by way of defence I pleaded my desire for, and indulgence in, reading. This appeared rather to aggravate than serve my cause. It was evidently their opinion, that all books, except such as they deemed religious ones, ought not be read by young men. I ventured somewhat timidly to hint, that it was possible for a young man to read novels, and other works of fiction, and still keep his mind free from irreligion and vice...".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

Laurence Sterne : 

'Christopher Thomson was a "zealous" Methodist until he discovered Shakespeare, Miilton, Sterne and Dr Johnson at a circulating library. When his absence from Sunday chapel was noticed, "I was called to account for it; by way of defence I pleaded my desire for, and indulgence in, reading. This appeared rather to aggravate than serve my cause. It was evidently their opinion, that all books, except such as they deemed religious, ones ought not be read by young men. I ventured somewhat timidly to hint, that it was possible for a young man to read novels, and other works of fiction, and still keep his mind free from irreligion and vice...".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

Samuel Johnson : 

'Christopher Thomson was a "zealous" Methodist until he discovered Shakespeare, Miilton, Sterne and Dr Johnson at a circulating library. When his absence from Sunday chapel was noticed, "I was called to account for it; by way of defence I pleaded my desire for, and indulgence in, reading. This appeared rather to aggravate than serve my cause. It was evidently their opinion, that all books, except such as they deemed religious ones, ought not to be read by young men. I ventured somewhat timidly to hint, that it was possible for a young man to read novels, and other works of fiction, and still keep his mind free from irreligion and vice...".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'Circuit preacher Joseph Barker found that theology simply could not compete with Shakespeare: "What pleased me most was the simplicity and beauty of his style. He had always a meaning in what he said, and you could easily see his meaning. He never talked at random or lost himself in a mist. I had at this time been so accustomed to meet dull, mysterious and unmeaning stuff in many religious books as they are called, that I felt quite delighted to read something that was rational, plain, stirring, and straightforward".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

William Cowper : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

Alexander Pope : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : [unknown]

'Shakespeare incited his appetitie for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

George Gordon Byron : 

'Byron had intoxicated him "with the freedom of his style of writing, with the fervour or passionateness of his feelings and with the dark and terrible pictures which he seemed to take pleasure in painting". The general effect of reading Milton, Hobbes, Locke and Newton had been "to make me resolve to be free. I saw that it was impossible for the soul of man to answer the end for which it was created, while tramelled by human authority, or fettered with human creeds. I saw that if I was to do justice to truth, to God, or to my own soul, I must break loose from all creeds and laws of men's devising, and live in full and unrestricted liberty..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'Byron had intoxicated him "with the freedom of his style of writing, with the fervour or passionateness of his feelings and with the dark and terrible pictures which he seemed to take pleasure in painting". The general effect of reading Milton, Hobbes, Locke and Newton had been "to make me resolve to be free. I saw that it was impossible for the soul of man to answer the end for which it was created, while tramelled by human authority, or fettered with human creeds. I saw that if I was to do justice to truth, to God, or to my own soul, I must break loose from all creeds and laws of men's devising, and live in full and unrestricted liberty..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

Thomas Hobbes : 

'Byron had intoxicated him "with the freedom of his style of writing, with the fervour or passionateness of his feelings and with the dark and terrible pictures which he seemed to take pleasure in painting". The general effect of reading Milton, Hobbes, Locke and Newton had been "to make me resolve to be free. I saw that it was impossible for the soul of man to answer the end for which it was created, while tramelled by human authority, or fettered with human creeds. I saw that if I was to do justice to truth, to God, or to my own soul, I must break loose from all creeds and laws of men's devising, and live in full and unrestricted liberty..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

John Locke : 

'Byron had intoxicated him "with the freedom of his style of writing, with the fervour or passionateness of his feelings and with the dark and terrible pictures which he seemed to take pleasure in painting". The general effect of reading Milton, Hobbes, Locke and Newton had been "to make me resolve to be free. I saw that it was impossible for the soul of man to answer the end for which it was created, while tramelled by human authority, or fettered with human creeds. I saw that if I was to do justice to truth, to God, or to my own soul, I must break loose from all creeds and laws of men's devising, and live in full and unrestricted liberty..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

Isaac Newton : 

'Byron had intoxicated him "with the freedom of his style of writing, with the fervour or passionateness of his feelings and with the dark and terrible pictures which he seemed to take pleasure in painting". The general effect of reading Milton, Hobbes, Locke and Newton had been "to make me resolve to be free. I saw that it was impossible for the soul of man to answer the end for which it was created, while tramelled by human authority, or fettered with human creeds. I saw that if I was to do justice to truth, to God, or to my own soul, I must break loose from all creeds and laws of men's devising, and live in full and unrestricted liberty..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'Though one former ploughboy extolled Shakespeare for possessing a deep sense of the pure morality of the Gospel" and quoted from him on most of the 440 pages of his autobiography, he was anxious to insist that "Shakespeare can be far more appreciated and better understood in the closet than in a public theater".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Westcott Tilke      Print: Book

  

Farell Lee Bevan : Peep of Day

'Farell Lee Bevan's Peep of Day (759,000 copies in print by 1888) supplied him with the frame of a totalistic religious ideology: "It was from these pages that I got my first idea of the moral foundations of the universe, was handed the first key with which to unlock the mysteries of the world in which I found myself. These little books served the purpose of an index or filing system; a framework of iron dogma, if you like, providing an orderly arrangement of the world and its history for the young mind, under two main categories, Good and Evil". But Jones also attended a board school, where he found "salvation" in an old cupboard of books presented by the local MP. They were mainly volumes of voyages and natural history, "which took a Rhymney boy away into the realms of wonder over the seas to the Malay Archipelago, to Abyssinia, to the sources of the Nile and the Albert Nyanza, to the curiosities of natural history, piloted by James Bruce, Samuel Baker and Frank Buckland".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

James Bruce : Travels to Discover the Source of the Nile, In the Years 1768, 1769, 1770, 1771, 1772 and 1773.

'Farell Lee Bevan's Peep of Day (759,000 copies in print by 1888) supplied him with the frame of a totalistic religious ideology: "It was from these pages that I got my first idea of the moral foundations of the universe, was handed the first key with which to unlock the mysteries of the world in which I found myself. These little books served the purpose of an index or filing system; a framework of iron dogma, if you like, providing an orderly arrangement of the world and its history for the young mind, under two main categories, Good and Evil". But Jones also attended a board school, where he found "salvation" in an old cupboard of books presented by the local MP. They were mainly volumes of voyages and natural history, "which took a Rhymney boy away into the realms of wonder over the seas to the Malay Archipelago, to Abyssinia, to the sources of the Nile and the Albert Nyanza, to the curiosities of natural history, piloted by James Bruce, Samuel Baker and Frank Buckland".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Samuel Baker : [Probably] 'The Albert N'yanza, Great Basin of the Nile, and Explorations of the Nile Sources'

'Farell Lee Bevan's Peep of Day (759,000 copies in print by 1888) supplied him with the frame of a totalistic religious ideology: "It was from these pages that I got my first idea of the moral foundations of the universe, was handed the first key with which to unlock the mysteries of the world in which I found myself. These little books served the purpose of an index or filing system; a framework of iron dogma, if you like, providing an orderly arrangement of the world and its history for the young mind, under two main categories, Good and Evil". But Jones also attended a board school, where he found "salvation" in an old cupboard of books presented by the local MP. They were mainly volumes of voyages and natural history, "which took a Rhymney boy away into the realms of wonder over the seas to the Malay Archipelago, to Abyssinia, to the sources of the Nile and the Albert Nyanza, to the curiosities of natural history, piloted by James Bruce, Samuel Baker and Frank Buckland".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Frank Buckland : 

'Farell Lee Bevan's Peep of Day (759,000 copies in print by 1888) supplied him with the frame of a totalistic religious ideology: "It was from these pages that I got my first idea of the moral foundations of the universe, was handed the first key with which to unlock the mysteries of the world in which I found myself. These little books served the purpose of an index or filing system; a framework of iron dogma, if you like, providing an orderly arrangement of the world and its history for the young mind, under two main categories, Good and Evil". But Jones also attended a board school, where he found "salvation" in an old cupboard of books presented by the local MP. They were mainly volumes of voyages and natural history, "which took a Rhymney boy away into the realms of wonder over the seas to the Malay Archipelago, to Abyssinia, to the sources of the Nile and the Albert Nyanza, to the curiosities of natural history, piloted by James Bruce, Samuel Baker and Frank Buckland".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington MacAulay : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : History of England

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen-hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Thomas Hardy : Far from the Madding Crowd

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Josephus : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Plutarch : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Samuel Pepys : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe : The Sorrows of Young Werther

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Samuel Johnson : Lives of the Poets

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

 : The Bible

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: father of Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

 : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: father of Thomas Jones      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Adam Smith : The Wealth of Nations

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson... "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : Principles of Political Economy

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Book

  

Alfred Marshall : Principles of Economics

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Unknown

  

 : [history and philosophy]

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Unknown

  

 : Great Thoughts

'It was filled with a high but vague nonconformity, and tried to combine the ideals of revivalist Christianity and great literature. There were articles on 'aspects' of Ruskin, Carlyle, Browning, and other uplifting Victorians, and a great number of quotations, mainly "thoughts" from their works.... For some time this paper coloured my attitude to literature. I acquired a passion for "thoughts" and "thinkers", and demanded from literature a moral inspiration which would improve my character.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Shakespeare : 

'As a circuit preacher Pyke introduced farm people to Milton, Carlyle, Ruskin and Tolstoy. His own reading ranged from Shakespeare and Boswell to Shelley's poems and George Henry Lewes's History of Philosophy. He was even prepared to acknowledge the "genius" of Jude the Obscure, though he would have preferred a happy ending'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Pyke      Print: Book

  

James Boswell : 

'As a circuit preacher Pyke introduced farm people to Milton, Carlyle, Ruskin and Tolstoy. His own reading ranged from Shakespeare and Boswell to Shelley's poems and George Henry Lewes's History of Philosophy. He was even prepared to acknowledge the "genius" of Jude the Obscure, though he would have preferred a happy ending'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Pyke      Print: Book

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : [poems]

'As a circuit preacher Pyke introduced farm people to Milton, Carlyle, Ruskin and Tolstoy. His own reading ranged from Shakespeare and Boswell to Shelley's poems and George Henry Lewes's History of Philosophy. He was even prepared to acknowledge the "genius" of Jude the Obscure, though he would have preferred a happy ending'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Pyke      Print: Book

  

George Henry Lewes : History of Philosophy

'As a circuit preacher Pyke introduced farm people to Milton, Carlyle, Ruskin and Tolstoy. His own reading ranged from Shakespeare and Boswell to Shelley's poems and George Henry Lewes's History of Philosophy. He was even prepared to acknowledge the "genius" of Jude the Obscure, though he would have preferred a happy ending'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Pyke      Print: Book

  

Thomas Hardy : Jude the Obscure

'As a circuit preacher Pyke introduced farm people to Milton, Carlyle, Ruskin and Tolstoy. His own reading ranged from Shakespeare and Boswell to Shelley's poems and George Henry Lewes's History of Philosophy. He was even prepared to acknowledge the "genius" of Jude the Obscure, though he would have preferred a happy ending'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Pyke      Print: Book

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : [poetry]

'The propaganda of Robert Owen alone did not convert printer Thomas Frost... to socialism: "The poetry of Coleridge and Shelley was stirring within me and making me 'a Chartist and something more'". Frost had been an omnivorous reader since childhood, when he read his grandmother's volumes of The Spectator and The Persian Letters. Most subversive of all were the letters of the second Lord Lyttelton: "The attraction which this book had for me consisted, I believe, in the tinge of scepticism to be found in several of the letters, and in the metaphysical questions argued, lightly and cleverly, in others. I was beginning to assert for myself freedom of thought, and to rebel against custom and convention; and there was naturally much in common between the writer and the reader",'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Frost      Print: Book

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : [poetry]

'The propaganda of Robert Owen alone did not convert printer Thomas Frost... to socialism: "The poetry of Coleridge and Shelley was stirring within me and making me 'a Chartist and something more'". Frost had been an omnivorous reader since childhood, when he read his grandmother's volumes of The Spectator and The Persian Letters. Most subversive of all were the letters of the second Lord Lyttelton: "The attraction which this book had for me consisted, I believe, in the tinge of scepticism to be found in several of the letters, and in the metaphysical questions argued, lightly and cleverly, in others. I was beginning to assert for myself freedom of thought, and to rebel against custom and convention; and there was naturally much in common between the writer and the reader",'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Frost      Print: Book

  

Joseph Addison : The Spectator

'The propaganda of Robert Owen alone did not convert printer Thomas Frost to socialism: "The poetry of Coleridge and Shelley was stirring within me and making me 'a Chartist and something more'". Frost had been an omnivorous reader since childhood, when he read his grandmother's volumes of The Spectator and The Persian Letters. Most subversive of all were the letters of the second Lord Lyttelton: "The attraction which this book had for me consisted, I believe, in the tinge of scepticism to be found in several of the letters, and in the metaphysical questions argued, lightly and cleverly, in others. I was beginning to assert for myself freedom of thought, and to rebel against custom and convention; and there was naturally much in common between the writer and the reader",'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Frost      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, periodical bound into books

  

Charles de Secondat, Baron Montesquieu : The Persian Letters

'The propaganda of Robert Owen alone did not convert printer Thomas Frost to socialism: "The poetry of Coleridge and Shelley was stirring within me and making me 'a Chartist and something more'". Frost had been an omnivorous reader since childhood, when he read his grandmother's volumes of The Spectator and The Persian Letters. Most subversive of all were the letters of the second Lord Lyttelton: "The attraction which this book had for me consisted, I believe, in the tinge of scepticism to be found in several of the letters, and in the metaphysical questions argued, lightly and cleverly, in others. I was beginning to assert for myself freedom of thought, and to rebel against custom and convention; and there was naturally much in common between the writer and the reader",'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Frost      Print: Book

  

Thomas Second Lord Lyttelton : Letters

'The propaganda of Robert Owen alone did not convert printer Thomas Frost to socialism: "The poetry of Coleridge and Shelley was stirring within me and making me 'a Chartist and something more'". Frost had been an omnivorous reader since childhood, when he read his grandmother's volumes of The Spectator and The Persian Letters. Most subversive of all were the letters of the second Lord Lyttelton: "The attraction which this book had for me consisted, I believe, in the tinge of scepticism to be found in several of the letters, and in the metaphysical questions argued, lightly and cleverly, in others. I was beginning to assert for myself freedom of thought, and to rebel against custom and convention; and there was naturally much in common between the writer and the reader",'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Frost      Print: Book

  

Patrick Brydone : A Tour through Siciliy and Malta in a Series of Letters to William Beckford

"Within the last month I have read Tristram Shandy, Brydone's Sicily and Malta, and Moore's Travels in France," D[orothy] W[ordsworth] wrote in March 1796."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Laurence Sterne : Tristram Shandy

"Within the last month I have read Tristram Shandy, Brydone's Sicily and Malta, and Moore's Travels in France," D[orothy] W[ordsworth] wrote in March 1796."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Moore : Travels in France

"'Within the last month I have read Tristram Shandy, Brydone's Sicily and Malta, and Moore's Travels in France,' D[orothy] W[ordsworth] wrote in March 1796."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Miguel de Cervantes Savedra : Don Quixote

"Of my earliest days at school I have little to say, but that they were very happy ones, chiefly because I was left at liberty, and in the vacations, to read whatever books I liked ... I read all Fielding's works, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and any part of Swift that I liked." (Wordsworth, Prose Works vol. 3 p.372).

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Alain Rene Le Sage : Histoire de Gil Blas de Santillane

"Of my earliest days at school I have little to say, but that they were very happy ones, chiefly because I was left at liberty, and in the vacations, to read whatever books I liked ... I read all Fielding's works, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and any part of Swift that I liked." (Wordsworth, Prose Works vol. 3 p.372).

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Henry Fielding : 

"Of my earliest days at school I have little to say, but that they were very happy ones, chiefly because I was left at liberty, and in the vacations, to read whatever books I liked ... I read all Fielding's works, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and any part of Swift that I liked." (Wordsworth, Prose Works vol. 3 p.372).

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Jonathan Swift : Gulliver's Travels

"Towards the end of his life, W[ordsworth] recalled that during his 'earliest days at school' he read 'any part of Swift that I liked: Gulliver's Travels, and the Tale of the Tub, both being much to my taste' (Prose Works vol 3 p.372)."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Jonathan Swift : A Tale of a Tub

"Towards the end of his life, W[ordsworth] recalled that during his 'earliest days at school' he read 'any part of Swift that I liked: Gulliver's Travels, and the Tale of the Tub, both being much to my taste' (Prose Works vol 3 p.372)."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : Osorio

"In June 1797, D[orothy] W[ordsworth] wrote to Mary Hutchinson, telling her that, as soon as [S. T.] C[oleridge] arrived at Racedown Lodge, 'he repeated to us two acts and a half of his tragedy Osorio.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

William Collins : An Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland

"[in 29.10.1828 letter to Alexander Dyce] ... W[ordsworth] recalls that 'in 1788 the Ode was first printed from Dr Carlyle's copy, with Mr Mackenzie's supplemental lines - and was extensively circulated through the English newspapers, in which I remember to have read it with great pleasure upon its first appearance.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

"On 27 July 1799, W[ordsworth] told Cottle that 'Looking over some old monthly Magazines I saw a paragraph stating that your 'Arthur' was ready for the press!'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Enrico Caterina Davila : Historia delle Guerre Civili di Francia ... nella quale si contegnono le operationi di quattro re, Francesco II., Carlo IX., Henrico III. e Henrico IV. cognominato il Grande

"On 21 March 1796, [Wordsworth] told [William] Mathews that D[orothy] W[ordsworth] 'has already gone through half of Davila.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

Bryan Edwards : The History, Civil and Commercial, of the British Colonies in the West Indies

"As [S. T. Coleridge] recalled in the Friend, 'I had [when composing The Three Graves in 1798] been reading Bryan Edwards's account of the effects of the Oby Witchcraft on the Negroes in the West Indies, and Hearne's deeply interesting Anecdotes of similar workings on the imagination of the Copper Indians ...'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Samuel Hearne : A Journey from Prince of Wales's Fort in Hudson's Bay to the Northern Ocean, Undertaken ... for the Discovery of Copper Mines, a North West Passage, etc. in the Years 1769-1772

"As [S. T. Coleridge] recalled in the Friend [ii 89], 'I had [when composing The Three Graves in 1798] been reading Bryan Edwards's account of the effects of the Oby Witchcraft on the Negroes in the West Indies, and Hearne's deeply interesting Anecdotes of similar workings on the imagination of the Copper Indians ...'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Euclid : Elements I-IV, VI

"W[ordsworth] recollected that at Hawkshead ... ' ... I, with the other boys of the same standing, was put upon reading the first six books of Euclid, with the exception of the fifth ...'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Bernard Farish : 

"W[ordsworth]'s note to Guilt and Sorrow 81 acknowledges a borrowing 'From a short MS. poem read to me when an under-graduate, by my schoolfellow and friend Charles Farish, long since deceased. The verses were by a brother of his [John Bernard Farish], a man of promising genius, who died young.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Bernard Farish : 

"W[ordsworth]'s note to Guilt and Sorrow 81 acknowledges a borrowing 'From a short MS. poem read to me when an under-graduate, by my schoolfellow and friend Charles Farish, long since deceased. The verses were by a brother of his [John Bernard Farish], a man of promising genius, who died young.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Farish      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Foxe : Acts and Monuments of Matters Most Special and Memorable

"W[ordsworth] read the copy [of John Foxe, Acts and Monuments of Matters most Special and Memorable] preserved today in the Hawkshead Grammar School Library ..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : Gentleman's Magazine

"W[ordsworth]'s note to Descriptive Sketches 428 reads: 'These summer hamlets are probably (as I have seen observed by a critic in the Gentleman's Magazine) what Virgil alludes to in the expression 'Castella in tumulis.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Godwin : An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice

"'I have received from [Basil] Montagu, Godwyn's second edition,' reports W[ordsworth] on 21 March 1796: 'I expect to find the work much improved. I cannot say that I have been encouraged in this hope by the perusal of the second preface, which is all I have yet looked into.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe : 

"On 27 Feb. 1799, W[ordsworth] told [S. T.] C[oleridge] that 'My internal prejudge[ments con]cerning Wieland and Goethe ... were ... the result of no negligent perusal of the different fragments which I had seen in England.'"

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Paul Hentzner : A Journey into England

"Several extracts from Hentzner are copied into MS 1 of The Borderers, D[ove] C[ottage] MS 12, in the hand firstly of W[ordsworth] and then of D[orothy] W[ordsworth]."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Paul Hentzner : A Journey into England

"Several extracts from Hentzner are copied into MS 1 of The Borderers, D[ove] C[ottage] MS 12, in the hand firstly of W[ordsworth] and then of D[orothy] W[ordsworth]."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Robert Heron : Observations Made in a Journey through the Western Countries of Scotland

"in spring 1800 ... [Heron] provided one of the first entries in [Wordsworth's] Commonplace Book ..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : [history]

'indiscriminate reading brought... liberation to Chartist Robert Lowery. A prolonged illness gave him the opportunity to work through a bookseller's entire circulating library and much else besides... Where a prescribed reading list might have reflected the biases of the compiler, improvisational reading offered him a broad "general knowledge of history,... poetry and imaginative literature." The very fact that "I read without any order or method" forced his mind to exercise "A ready power of arranging the information this desultory reading presented". It inspired him to write poetry and fiction.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Lowery      Print: Book

  

 : [poetry]

'indiscriminate reading brought... liberation to Chartist Robert Lowery. A prolonged illness gave him the opportunity to work through a bookseller's entire circulating library and much else besides... Where a prescribed reading list might have reflected the biases of the compiler, improvisational reading offered him a broad "general knowledge of history,... poetry and imaginative literature." The very fact that "I read without any order or method" forced his mind to exercise "A ready power of arranging the information this desultory reading presented". It inspired him to write poetry and fiction.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Lowery      Print: Book

  

 : [imaginative literature]

'indiscriminate reading brought... liberation to Chartist Robert Lowery. A prolonged illness gave him the opportunity to work through a bookseller's entire circulating library and much else besides... Where a prescribed reading list might have reflected the biases of the compiler, improvisational reading offered him a broad "general knowledge of history,... poetry and imaginative literature." The very fact that "I read without any order or method" forced his mind to exercise "A ready power of arranging the information this desultory reading presented". It inspired him to write poetry and fiction.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Lowery      Print: Book

  

John Milton : L'Allegro

'As a Manchester warehouse porter, Samuel Bamford found the same richness in Milton: "His 'L'Allegro' and 'Il Penseroso' were but expressions of thoughts and feelings which my romantic imagination had not unfrequently led me to indulge, but which, until now, I had deemed beyond all human utterance".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Il Penseroso

'As a Manchester warehouse porter, Samuel Bamford found the same richness in Milton: "His 'L'Allegro' and 'Il Penseroso' were but expressions of thoughts and feelings which my romantic imagination had not unfrequently led me to indulge, but which, until now, I had deemed beyond all human utterance".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Homer  : 

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages, and ultimately William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Virgil  : 

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages, and ultimately William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages, and ultimately William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

[the great poets]  : 

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages, and ultimately William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Unknown

  

 : [classic histories]

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages and, ultimately, William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

 : [voyages]

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages and, ultimately, William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

William Cobbett : Political Register

'Milton established a habit of serious reading, which brought Bamford to Homer, Virgil, Shakespeare, the great poets, classic histories and voyages and, ultimately, William Cobbett's Political Register'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Philip Stanhope, 4th Lord Chesterfield : Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

 : T.P. and Cassell's Weekly

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Elinor Glyn : The Career of Catherine Bush

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

Geoffrey Chaucer : 

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

John Donne : 

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

Desiderius Erasmus Rotterdamus : 

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

Edward Gibbon : The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

James Joyce : Finnegan's Wake

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : Sartor Resartus

'Despising his job in a Birmingham factory, V.W. Garratt surrounded his workbench with a barricade of boxes, set up a small mirror to provide early warning of the foreman's approach and studied the Everyman's Library Sartor Resartus when he was being paid to solder gas-meter fittings.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

John Keats : 

'Garratt escaped [from factory life] to an evening course in English literature, where he felt "like a child that becomes ecstatic with a fireworks display". Keats, Shelley, and Tennyson "swamped the trivialities of life and gave my ego a fulness and strength in the lustre of which noble conceptions were born and flourished'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : 

'Garratt escaped [from factory life] to an evening course in English literature, where he felt "like a child that becomes ecstatic with a fireworks display". Keats, Shelley, and Tennyson "swamped the trivialities of life and gave my ego a fulness and strength in the lustre of which noble conceptions were born and flourished'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Alfred Lord Tennyson : 

'Garratt escaped [from factory life] to an evening course in English literature, where he felt "like a child that becomes ecstatic with a fireworks display". Keats, Shelley, and Tennyson "swamped the trivialities of life and gave my ego a fulness and strength in the lustre of which noble conceptions were born and flourished'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Homer  : 

'[Garratt] spent his free evenings in Birmingham's Central Free Library reading Homer, Epitectus, Longius and Plato's Dialogues, a classical education which further undermined his confidence in the status quo: "I began to wonder in what way we had advanced from the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome". In the First World War, he took Palgrave's Golden Treasury with him to France and wrote his own verses in the trenches'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Epictetus  : 

'[Garratt] spent his free evenings in Birmingham's Central Free Library reading Homer, Epitectus, Longius and Plato's Dialogues, a classical education which further undemined his confidence in the status quo: "I began to wonder in what way we had advanced from the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome". In the First World War, he took Palgrave's Golden Treasury with him to France and wrote his own verses in the trenches'..

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Longinus  : 

'[Garratt] spent his free evenings in Birmingham's Central Free Library reading Homer, Epitectus, Longius and Plato's Dialogues, a classical education which further undemined his confidence in the status quo: "I began to wonder in what way we had advanced from the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome". In the First World War, he took Palgrave's Golden Treasury with him to France and wrote his own verses in the trenches'..

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Plato  : Dialogues

'[Garratt] spent his free evenings in Birmingham's Central Free Library reading Homer, Epitectus, Longius and Plato's Dialogues, a classical education which further undemined his confidence in the status quo: "I began to wonder in what way we had advanced from the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome". In the First World War, he took Palgrave's Golden Treasury with him to France and wrote his own verses in the trenches'..

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Francis Turner Palgrave (ed.) : The Golden Treasury

'[Garratt] spent his free evenings in Birmingham's Central Free Library reading Homer, Epitectus, Longius and Plato's Dialogues, a classical education which further undemined his confidence in the status quo: "I began to wonder in what way we had advanced from the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome". In the First World War, he took Palgrave's Golden Treasury with him to France and wrote his own verses in the trenches'..

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: V.W. Garratt      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : 

'As a seaman in the mid-1870s, Ben Tillett had not yet been exposed to revolutionary literature, "But I discovered Thomas Carlyle and was held spellbound by the dark fury of his spirit and the strange contortions of his style".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Ben Tillett      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Carlyle : 

'As a young South Wales miner, Edmund Stonelake, who had never heard of the French Revolution, asked a bookseller for something on the subject and was sold Carlyle. At first it was hard reading, but eventually he extracted an entire political education from its pages: "I learned...of the great and lasting influence the Revolution had on peoples and countries struggling to establish democratic principles in Government in various parts of the world".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmund Stonelake      Print: Book, Unknown

  

Thomas Carlyle : Sartor Resartus

'Keir Hardie remembered that a "real turning point" of his life was his discovery of Sartor Resartus at age sixteen or seventeen. He had to read it through three times before he understood it: "I felt I was in the presence of some great power, the meaning of which I could only dimly guess at".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: James Keir Hardie      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth and beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year- old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

John Dryden : 

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth an beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : 

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth and beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Joseph Addison : 

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth an beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Richard Steele : 

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth and beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Alexander Pope : 'Ode on Solitude'

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth an beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

George Payne : Elements of Mental and Moral Science

'by age twenty [Mary Smith] had read and understood George Payne's Elements of Mental and Moral Science, Thomas Brown's Moral Philosophy, and Richard Whateley's Logic. But two authors in paticular offered magnificent revelations. First there was Emerson on Nature; and later, as a governess for a Scotby leatherworks owner, she discovered Thomas Carlyle: "Emerson and he henceforth became my two great masters of thought for the rest of my life. Carlyle's gospel of Work and exposure of Shams, and his universal onslaught on the nothings and appearances of society, gave strength and life to my vague but true enthusiasm. They proved a new Bible of blessedness to my eager soul, as they did thousands beside, who had become weary of much of the vapid literature of the time".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Thomas Brown : Moral Philosophy

'by age twenty [Mary Smith] had read and understood George Payne's Elements of Mental and Moral Science, Thomas Brown's Moral Philosophy, and Richard Whateley's Logic. But two authors in paticular offered magnificent revelations. First there was Emerson on Nature; and later, as a governess for a Scotby leatherworks owner, she discovered Thomas Carlyle: "Emerson and he henceforth became my two great masters of thought for the rest of my life. Carlyle's gospel of Work and exposure of Shams, and his universal onslaught on the nothings and appearances of society, gave strength and life to my vague but true enthusiasm. They proved a new Bible of blessedness to my eager soul, as they did thousands beside, who had become weary of much of the vapid literature of the time".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Richard Whateley : Logic

'by age twenty [Mary Smith] had read and understood George Payne's Elements of Mental and Moral Science, Thomas Brown's Moral Philosophy, and Richard Whateley's Logic. But two authors in paticular offered magnificent revelations. First there was Emerson on Nature; and later, as a governess for a Scotby leatherworks owner, she discovered Thomas Carlyle: "Emerson and he henceforth became my two great masters of thought for the rest of my life. Carlyle's gospel of Work and exposure of Shams, and his universal onslaught on the nothings and appearances of society, gave strength and life to my vague but true enthusiasm. They proved a new Bible of blessedness to my eager soul, as they did thousands beside, who had become weary of much of the vapid literature of the time".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : 

'by age twenty [Mary Smith] had read and understood George Payne's Elements of Mental and Moral Science, Thomas Brown's Moral Philosophy, and Richard Whateley's Logic. But two authors in paticular offered magnificent revelations. First there was Emerson on Nature; and later, as a governess for a Scotby leatherworks owner, she discovered Thomas Carlyle: "Emerson and he henceforth became my two great masters of thought for the rest of my life. Carlyle's gospel of Work and exposure of Shams, and his universal onslaught on the nothings and appearances of society, gave strength and life to my vague but true enthusiasm. They proved a new Bible of blessedness to my eager soul, as they did thousands beside, who had become weary of much of the vapid literature of the time".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : 

'by age twenty [Mary Smith] had read and understood George Payne's Elements of Mental and Moral Science, Thomas Brown's Moral Philosophy, and Richard Whateley's Logic. But two authors in paticular offered magnificent revelations. First there was Emerson on Nature; and later, as a governess for a Scotby leatherworks owner, she discovered Thomas Carlyle: "Emerson and he henceforth became my two great masters of thought for the rest of my life. Carlyle's gospel of Work and exposure of Shams, and his universal onslaught on the nothings and appearances of society, gave strength and life to my vague but true enthusiasm. They proved a new Bible of blessedness to my eager soul, as they did thousands beside, who had become weary of much of the vapid literature of the time".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottlieb Fichte : 

'like the great man [Carlyle] himself, [Mary Smith] studied Fichte, Schiller and Goethe'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller : 

'like the great man [Carlyle] himself, [Mary Smith] studied Fichte, Schiller and Goethe'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe : 

'like the great man [Carlyle] himself, [Mary Smith] studied Fichte, Schiller and Goethe'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : Sartor Resartus

At age fourteen, Elizabeth Bryson read Sartor Resartus, a favorite book of her father, an impoverished Dundee bookkeeper. There she encountered "the exciting experience of being kindled to the point of explosion by the fire of words", words that expressed what she had always been trying to say: "It seems that from our earliest days we are striving to become articulate, stuggling to clothe in words our vague perceptions and questionings. Suddenly, blazing from the printed page, there ARE the words, the true resounding words that we couldn't find. It is an exciting moment... 'Who am I? The thing that can say I. Who am I, what is this ME?'. I had been groping to know that since I was three". She consumed Heroes and Hero-Worship, The French Revolution and Sartor Resartus with the same intoxication'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Bryson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : Heroes and Hero-worship

At age fourteen, Elizabeth Bryson read Sartor Resartus, a favorite book of her father, an impoverished Dundee bookkeeper. There she encountered "the exciting experience of being kindled to the point of explosion by the fire of words", words that expressed what she had always been trying to say: "It seems that from our earliest days we are striving to become articulate, stuggling to clothe in words our vague perceptions and questionings. Suddenly, blazing from the printed page, there ARE the words, the true resounding words that we couldn't find. It is an exciting moment... 'Who am I? The thing that can say I. Who am I, what is this ME?'. I had been groping to know that since I was three". She consumed Heroes and Hero-Worship, The French Revolution and Sartor Resartus with the same intoxication'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Bryson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : The French Revolution

At age fourteen, Elizabeth Bryson read Sartor Resartus, a favorite book of her father, an impoverished Dundee bookkeeper. There she encountered "the exciting experience of being kindled to the point of explosion by the fire of words", words that expressed what she had always been trying to say: "It seems that from our earliest days we are striving to become articulate, stuggling to clothe in words our vague perceptions and questionings. Suddenly, blazing from the printed page, there ARE the words, the true resounding words that we couldn't find. It is an exciting moment... 'Who am I? The thing that can say I. Who am I, what is this ME?'. I had been groping to know that since I was three". She consumed Heroes and Hero-Worship, The French Revolution and Sartor Resartus with the same intoxication'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Bryson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : Heroes and Hero Worship

'Labour Party pioneer F.W. Jowett..., reading Heroes and Hero-Worship as a young millworker, was attracted by its vision of a new society but repelled by its authoritarianism: "there must have been something in me that could not respond to his powerful and eloquent glorification of the supermen - including the captains of industry who would organise production not for profit but for use - for in all things else he made a deep impression on my young mind... The more I read of Carlyle's heroes, the less attraction they had. I did not like his Luther, his Frederick the Great, nor his Cromwell... the more Carlyle crowned and canonised the ruling class, the more I felt I was on the side of the common people'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : Sartor Resartus

'[Robert Blatchford] found Sartor Resartus intimidating: "after reading the famous meditaton on the sleeping city, I threw the book across the room. I felt I should never be able to write like that".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Blatchford      Print: Book

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in the trial of James Stewart for theft: James James (Witness): "afterwards I saw the advertisement in the 'Daily Advertiser' about the prisoner at the bar being detained with a piece of ticking on his shoulders, I went in consequence of that..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James James      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in a trial for highway robbery William Aldrich: "on the 23rd of June, at half past ten at night, the prisoner Hanlon brought me a watch to pledge... on the Monday evening I sent for the 'Daily Advertiser' and there I saw a robbery had been done near Caen-Wood"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Aldrich      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial of Sarah Evans for murder Thomas Aris: "The first thing I heard of the child being drowned, I saw it in the paper, saying, the child of Sarah Evans. On Tuesday the 16th, I think it was the 'Daily Advertiser', and seeing Sarah Evans in the paper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Aris      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Morning Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for housebreaking/receiving stolen goods: Thomas Davies: "I think it was in the middle of November I saw it in the 'Morning Advertiser' -I never heard of it, or read it before, on my oath, I did not speak to my brother about it when I read it in the 'Morning Advertiser'..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Davies      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft: Thomas Jones: "reading the 'Daily Advertiser' and finding they were advertised, I went out and fetched them from Mr Humphreys, to whom they were sold..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft: Benjamin Bunn: "I am a pawnbroker and live in Houndsditch... I was reading the 'Daily Advertiser', and I saw an advertisement of a box, and some garden seeds, and a gown and thirteen yeards of blue silk, lost from the George on Snow-hill..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft: Samuel Spencer: "The next day about 11 o'clock I read in the 'Advertiser', 'A silver pint mug, marked E.M.M. stole out of the Two Chairmen, in Warder-street, Soho..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Spencer      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Public Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft/ receiving stolen goods: Robert Alexander: "[the prisoner] brought a saw to pawn... I lent him 2s upon it; the next morning I was reading the Public Advertiser, I saw this saw expressed particularly, and mentioned to have been stolen; I went to Mr Fieldings as the advertisement directed..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Alexander      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft/ receiving stolen goods: John Wyn: "On the 17th of December I had been looking over the papers there I read about Mr Parker's being robbed: I charged all my people, if any handkerchiefs were brought in to stop them; in about half an hour after came Alice Raney and Rose Fay; they offered me these three handkerchiefs...then I sent my boy for the Daily Advertiser, and read over the advertisement to them, and said they must certainly know the rest; they would not own any further..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wyn      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft/ receiving stolen goods: John Wyn: "On the 17th of December I had been looking over the papers there I read about Mr Parker's being robbed: I charged all my people, if any handkerchiefs were brought in to stop them; in about half an hour after came Alice Raney and Rose Fay; they offered me these three handkerchiefs...then I sent my boy for the Daily Advertiser, and read over the advertisement to them, and said they must certainly know the rest; they would not own any further..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wyn      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft: George Martin: [prisoner offered him cup for sale] "the next morning I read it in the 'Daily Advertiser', only in the paper it is said to be marked with letters on the handle, but the letters on the belly of the cup..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Martin      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for for theft/ receiving stolen goods: Charles Clark: "On the 18th of November, in the forenoon, Mary English came and pledged four silver teaspoons with me... A little after I read the Advertiser, and I found by the description, they were stolen..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Clark      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for pickpocketing: Thomas Burch: "On Monday morning the 7th of July, the prisoner brought this watch to me... I lent him two guineas on it; after that I read the Advertiser, the advertisement mentioned a green ribbon, but this is a white one, everything else answers; I immediately went with it to Justice Fielding..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burch      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for fraud: Thomas Douglas: "I saw this advertisement in the Daily Advertiser of the 1st of March last. (It is read to the court)... In consequence of this advertisement, I went to the Globe Tavern..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Douglas      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: Gravat: "I am in the news business; my son delivered me the watch-cases on Monday night, soon after he had found them I received a handbill, and then I carried them to Mr Johnson..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gravat      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Joseph Dobree: "I am a pawnbroker: I took in this property of a witness who is here, Mary Brown, on the 5th of May; the next day a handbill came in, describing, as I thought, the property, directing to apply to Mr Rendington, Charles-street, Covent-Garden; I took it there, it proved to be part of the property lost..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Dobree      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary: John Monk: "I have for some years past supported myself by thieving... Waine came about twelve the next day. Percival was there and an acquaintence called upon me, and shewed me a handbill of the robbery..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Monk      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Mary Flint: "...in consequence of a handbill that I received I had the prisoners taken into custody..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Flint      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary/ receiving stolen goods: Henry Ewer: "I am a shopman to Mr Dobree, Oxford-street... I found the watch answered to the description of one of the watches in Mr Seabrook's handbill, I stopped the watch and sent for an officer..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Ewer      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary: James Gideon: "On the 29th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner Chord came and offered a small gold brooch set... I suspected him and sent for a constable who came; I showed him the brooch, which appeared to answer the description of one in a handbill which I had received before; I showed the constable the handbill in the prisoner's presence..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Gideon      Print: Handbill

  

 : Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for shoplifting: Elias Mordecai: "I set my Basket one Day upon a post, and saw Moses show a Watch to two Gentlemen... five or six days after, I read in the Advertiser, that there was a watch lost belonging to Mr Seddon..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elias Mordecai      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for theft: Josiah Howard: The 19th of May I and three journeyman-packers left work and came to the Bull-head in Jewin-street; I get much in liquor; ...[in Redcross-street] I tumbled down... I felt my watch, my hat and my handkerchief go from me... I advertised my watch the 27th of May and the 26th of June; I read in the Advertiser there were eight people taken up in Kingsland-road and divers things found upon them..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Josiah Howard      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Prisoner's defence in trial for highway robbery: "When I came home I went to a coffee-house in Long-acre and asked for the Daily Advertiser, there I saw the paragraph about a dead highwayman..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Alexander Bourk      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: James Palace: "A night or two after I read in the Advertiser a watch, name Ingraham, describing it to be the same as I had received. I went away to the prosecutor's house by the direction of the advertisement..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Palace      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for receiving stolen goods: Robert Daniel Liddell: "I am in Mr Marshall's employ. On the 10th of March he left me to bring these boxes home and when I got opposite St Sepulchre's church I was looking at a playbill, a man in a white great coat came up, tapped me on the shoulder and said I was wanted..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Daniel Liddell      Print: Handbill, playbill

  

 : Temple of Reason

Witness statement in trial for publishing a blasphemous and seditious libel: William Smith: "I saw [the prisoner] serving in the shop and bought this book of him... I read part of the pamphlet as I went along the streets..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Smith      

  

 : The Republican

Witness statement in trial for publishing a blasphemous and seditious libel: Prisoner questions witness Raven Q: Pray, did you read no.17 of 'The Republican' before you employed that person to purchase it? A: I did. Q: You consider it an impious and blasphemous book? A: Most assuredly. Q: Pray, what do you mean by blasphemy? A: Any publication which has a tendency to vilify the Bible, the Christian Religion, or our Lord Jesus Christ

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Baldwin Raven      

  

Sir John Fielding : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: William Masters: "some time on the 26th of December, we received a handbill from Sir John Fielding, describing this watch to have been stolen by a single highwayman on the 24th, with a reward of ten guineas over and above the reward allowed by act of parliament; between four and five that afternoon my apprentice came to me in the parlour, and brought me this watch and the handbill..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Masters      Print: Handbill

  

Sir John Fielding : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: John Brooks: "the handbill came from Sir John Fielding's on the 26th of December; I saw it in the shop between three and four, and the prisoner came in the evening... he told me he wanted ten guineas upon this watch... I seeing it answered the description in the handbill, I took that and the bill into the parlour to my master..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Brooks      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for forgery: William Moreland: "I saw the handbill that had been circulated, advertising that Mr Ryland had been suspected of forgery, and a reward advertised for apprehending him..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Moreland      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Allen: "I took the prisoners that night in Kingsland-road... in the morning a printer's boy came to me with a handbill, and I then found that it answered to the property that I found on them"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Allen      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: Thomas Brown: "I took an axe of Jones the same evening afterwards; that was on the Tuesday evening and on Wednesday there was a handbill mentioning these things; I was going up to Bow-street..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Brown      Print: Handbill

  

Homer : Iliad

"[in Aug. 1787 Dorothy Wordsworth] reported that 'I am at present [reading] the Iliad' ... "

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock : [odes]

"On 21 Sept 1798, Klopstock read to W[ordsworth] and C[oleridge] 'some passages from his odes in which he has adopted the latin measures' (Wordsworth, Prose Works vol. 1, p.91).

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock      

  

 : 

"In late Nov. 1795, W[ordsworth] wrote to [Francis] Wrangham: " ... we see only here a provincial weekly paper ..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Isaac Newton : Opticks

"[Thomas] Bowman [Wordsworth's schoolmaster] once left the young W[ordsworth] in his study for a moment and returned to find him reading the Opticks."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Ovid : Metamorphoses

"Late in life, W[ordsworth] remembered that he discovered Ovid before Virgil: 'Before I read Virgil I was so strongly attached to Ovid, whose Metamorphoses I read at school, that I was in quite a passion, whenever I found him, in books of criticism, placed below Virgil.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Henry Butt: "On the 26th of August I took in two gravy spoons... Two days after...a handbill came in; I read it over, and thought it was some of this plate: I shewed it [to my employers]: the two spoons I delivered up at Bow-street."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Butt      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: William Aldus: "I am a servant to Mr Salkeld; I produce four table-cloths, and twelve napkins, which I received from the prisoner; ...I immediately carried them to Bow-street on seeing the handbill..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Aldus      Print: Handbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Rebecca Johnson: "I began to wash a few things after dinner, and soon after she came -we dine at one o'clock; we have a newspaper, which comes at one, and goes at three -my husband goes to work about five minutes past two; the newspaper had been about three-quarters of an hour when she came ...Mr Whitewood let her in; he was reading the newspaper when she knocked." Anthony Whitehead: "I am a sail-maker and lodge at Johnson's... [I] let the prisoner is from half-past two to three o'clock -I was reading the paper when she knocked..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anthony Whitewood      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for murder: Samuel Davis: [in reply to question about length of time he spent in the water closet] Some few minutes -I cannot say how long, not longer than was necessary... I had a newspaper reading there..." Jonathan Smithies [his defence]: "[Davis] asked me for my Sunday's newspaper, saying he wished to use the watercloset -he took the newspaper... [I waited] sufficient time for him to come out; I then went down again, having occasion to go to the watercloset myself, and asked him if he was coming out, when he said, 'I shall be half an hour yet' -he had the newspaper with him and I suppose he was reading it..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Davies      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for housebreaking: John Osrorne: "I know Wood, he came to my house on the 29th of July... I then heard he was in trouble, and in reading the newspaper I saw it was on the 29th of July..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Osrorne      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for housebreaking: Elizabeth Baglee: "I read in a newspaper of the robbery, a day or two after the robbery, and from the description it gave of Sanderson, I went immediately to him where he lodged.."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Baglee      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for robbery: James John Conolly: "I am a policeman, I apprehended the prisoner Wright on Monday afternoon, about four o'clock (the afternoon of the robbery) in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel, in a house of ill-fame where he lodged; he was reading the newspaper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Wright      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: James Robertson: "I keep a public house in Stanhope-street, Clare market -the prisoner and another came in on the 12th of February, and called for a pot of hot -they went into the parlour, where the clock was -I had the paper-hangers at work there the night before, and asked them to go into the tap-room, but they objected -the man with him came out and read the newspaper to me at the bar -this raised my suspicion -I told my servant to keep watch..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: James Collins: "I was sitting near the bar reading the newspaper, when I turned my head, and saw the prisoner come out of the room, go up stairs, and come down again..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Collins      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Robert Price: "I was standing reading a playbill that was stuck up, the prisoner came and laid his hand on my shoulder as before, and said, They will all be acted tonight, meaning the plays..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Price      Print: Advertisement, Handbill, Poster, Playbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Robert Price: "I was standing reading a playbill that was stuck up, the prisoner came and laid his hand on my shoulder as before, and said, They will all be acted tonight, meaning the plays..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Pead      Print: Advertisement, Handbill, Poster, Playbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: James John Streath: "On the 18th of October last this man watched me in the Strand. He was looking at a playbill... This was about nine o'clock. I saw this man and another looking at a playbill at a small butter shop, the other side of Bedford-street..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Frederick Constable      Print: Advertisement, Handbill, Poster, Playbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for pickpocketing: John Everhard Berckemyer: "On the 11th of October, about ten o'clock, I stopped in Newgate-street, to read a playbill;..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Everard Berckemyer      Print: Advertisement, Handbill, Poster, playbill

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for assault: Charles Bradfield: "In the forenoon of Saturday, 4th of October, I went into the Bull public-house to have my breakfast -I was reading the newspaper and had a beef-steak, which I gave to Sherman, the servant, to be dressed -the prisoner came in, and asked me for the newspaper -I said he should have it in a minute or two -he said if it had not been for me, he should have been in service at that time... [fight ensues, prisoner stabs Bradfield with knife]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Bradfield      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for coining: "Arthur Cross deposed, that he was reading the newspaper at the Black RAven in Fetter-lane about six weeks ago, wherein Mr Cooper was mentioned, Mr Sutton said he knew him very well, was in Holland with him...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Arthur Cross      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Isaac Reeve: "After this I happened to read in the Newspaper of a quart silver tankard being stole in the prosecutor's house. I went tither, and there was the prisoner. I told the affair before Sir Samuel Gower..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Isaac Reeve      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Feling: "I was at the Lion in the Wood reading the newspaper, there was Esq; Henson's coachman, then came the prisoner..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Abraham Feling      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Everill knew John White had been charged with stealing a trunk as it was read to him from a newspaper by a landlady named Fox 2 or 3 weeks before the trial

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Everill      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: Sharpling: "last Thursday was with [the prisoner] between four and five o'clock, he was very much in liquor, this was at the Bear and Ragged Staff; I was looking over the newspaper, he insisted on my drinking a glass of wine with him..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Sharpling      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Q: "Do you know when Cox was taken up?" Taylor: "I saw it in the newspaper"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Taylor      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Thomas Crocket: "I keep Pan's Coffee-house in Castle-street; on the 9th of November last, the prisoner came into my house, between six and seven in the evening, and called for a glass of brandy and water; I served him with it; he staid about a quarter of an hour reading a newspaper; after he had read the paper he asked for a bason of soup;..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Watson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: Henry Barnard: "I went to Baker's Coffee-house to search the newspaper, whether this bill, which I suspected to be stolen, was advertised, but did not make any discovery that day [23rd Dec]; upon Tuesday the 24th I examined again;..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Barnard      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: Henry Barnard: "I went to Baker's Coffee-house to search the newspaper, whether this bill, which I suspected to be stolen, was advertised, but did not make any discovery that day [23rd Dec]; upon Tuesday the 24th I examined again;..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Barnard      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: John Williamson: "I went and got a pennyworth of gin. I had a newspaper in my hand; she said she had found a purse with bank notes and money in it to the value of three hundred pounds, and asked me if it was advertised..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Williamson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Elizabeth Marlow: "In the morning of the 23rd I was looking into the newspaper for a particular thing I wanted to see. I saw an advertisement that answered the description of the prisoner. I went immediately to Sir John Fieldings..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Marlow      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary: James Harrison: "I know both prisoners. On the 7th of September, I was in company with Underwood, at the Angel, Mr Fitzpatrick's, at Hoxton, between nine and ten o'clock. I took up the newspaper, to read it: I saw an account of the robbery of Mr Sharpe's house: I told him it was a great robbery..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Harrison      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary: 2 statements -that George Todd was apprehended in a public house, reading a newspaper at the time

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Todd      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for coining: John Bailey: "I am an engraver in Fleet-market. I saw the prisoner, as well as I can recollect, the first time was June last. I met him accidently at a public house in Fleet-market, where I used to go to read the newspaper..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Bailey      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for stealing: John Jackson: "I came up by coach, I got down at the White Horse Cellar in Piccadilly, I was very much benumbed with cold. I drank several glasses of rum on the road to keep out the cold, then I went and had a pint of beer, and read the newspaper, then I had another."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Jackson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary: Joseph Jackson: "I come on account of recollecting a circumstance in an advertisement, that I saw in the newspaper, concerning the robbery committed on the 25th of May...What brought me was to see whether it is either of the prisoners at the bar, on account of an advertisement that I read in a newspaper..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Jackson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for stealing: William Watson: "...my house was robbed on the 17th of March... I told my case and on the 19th, I saw in the newspaper a description that answered my marks; I went to the constable and told him what I had..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Watson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Alexander Jack: "...we went to another house a little further on, and there was a man sitting with a pot of beer, reading a newspaper by himself..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for shoplifting: Walter English: "on the 15th of January last, in the morning, I was in my parlour reading the newspaper, about ten in the morning..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Walter English      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Defence of prisoner in his trial for theft James Lewis: "...we went to the Gun, and he asked me to go in; the gentlewoman said come into the parlour, we staid there, and drank the liquor out, then we went into the kitchen, I was reading the newspaper, I went out to the door..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lewis      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Keturah Dyts (wife of landlord): "...on the 15th of August my husband was taken ill; the prisoner was sitting in the kitchen reading the newspaper, about four yards from where the watch hung..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Mills      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for murder: Joshua Parish: "I know the middle man (Payne); it is near three weeks ago since I first saw him... after this I saw in a newspaper an advertisement that I thought applied to him; I gave information..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joshua Parish      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Q: "When did you hear of Sadi's death, madam?" Sullivan: "I really cannot tell; I was in the country; I first read it in the newspaper"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Sullivan      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for robbery: Jane Toosey swore to the court that she read about this crime in the newspaper -The Daily Advertiser

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Toosey      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Gazetteer and Daily Advertiser

Witness statement in trial for theft: Esther Radford: [Bevan picks up parcel in Pond-street and takes it to Radford]... he gave them into my possession, and I put them into a bureau, and I desired my servant, when she went out, to get me a newspaper; which was produced to me on Monday; I read it through to see if such things were advertised; I saw no such thing... I fancy it was the Gazetteer and Daily Advertiser; it was the Monday's paper to the best of my knowledge, but I cannot particularly say; I looked the paper particularly through..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Esther Radford      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for forgery: Joseph Lecree: "...a card was left for me to go to Ibberson's Coffee-house, where I was directed to my Lord, the first time I went at twelve, my Lord was not come in, but calling again about half after twelve, he was there, reading the newspaper, he hired me as a servant..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Griffin      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

This trial concerned with the manner in which William Hudson read the newspaper (or several) to other customers at the New London Coffee-house and the seditious comments he made on its content. For example, witness statement: John Leech: "Mr Hudson and Mr Pigot came into the London Coffee-house, between seven and eight o'clock, the 30th of September last, it was on a Monday evening, they had been in the house more than half an hour, and they had had three glasses of punch and began to be noisy, they called for several papers, in fact I believe all the papers, and as they called them they read different paragraphs from them and commented on the paragraphs as they went on..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Hudson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Elizabeth Kinsey, describing actions of prisoner William Mortimer while in tap room of the public house: "I did not see him doing anything but sitting there; after some time he looked at the newspaper..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Mortimer      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Mary Rose: "I was reading in the newspaper some time after, and saw a person that had been deprived of half-a-guinea and was in custody, and I went to Marlborough-street and saw him there

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Rose      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Thomas Tuck: "Last Saturday, about three o'clock, the prisoner was in my parlour, drinking a glass of liquor; I keep a public house; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; he was looking at the newspaper for about an hour and a half..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Simmonds      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for embezzlement: Anthony Parkin: "he went on Saturday morning to a public house, the sign of the Goat, in Cheyne-street, near Gower-street, where he saw the landlord and landlady of the house; he asked for the newspaper; to see if they were advertised, but he did not find any advertisement..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Norton      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statements in trial for forgery: Eleanor Castle: "The very day he was taken up, he read the paper at our house... Near two o'clock, in the middle of the day... it was that day's paper, and we never let it out; he sat down and read it" Prisoner: "I went to the public house to see the paper to see if such notes were advertised; the last time I went into the public house was the Saturday morning, the day I was taken up"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Lovell      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statements in trial for theft: James Streeter: "...says I, Mich, how did you come by this, I am afraid you did not get it honestly; he persisted in it, that he had received it for his cousin's prize money; the next morning, I saw it advertised in the newspaper and sent for a constable..."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Streeter      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for highway robbery: Q: "How came Mrs Carey to read the almanack?" Norris: "She was reading it, looking over it to see what day of the month it was" "...I heard a person reading a newspaper...I mean an almanack, not a newspaper" Q: "What sort of almanack was it?" A: "Almost like a newspaper, it was stuck up against the wall"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey      Print: Broadsheet, Poster, Almanack

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: William Olley: "On Thursday the 7th of May, about ten in the morning, I was sitting at the top of the shop reading a newspaper, opposite the east door..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Olley      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: John Lench: "On Saturday the 7th of May, between twelve and one, I was reading the newspaper at the public house, the Blue Bell..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Lench      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: Thomas Watts: "...there was a gentleman in the house reading a newspaper and I shewed it [the case] to him..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for burglary: Robinson: "I was reading the newspaper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Robinson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Witness statement in trial for theft: John Wiffin: "On the 1st of August, I was reading the newspaper at the Northumberland Arms, Grafton-street, ...during the time I was reading the paper the prisoner came in, he asked me what news..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wiffin      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

prisoner's statement in trial for theft: Thomas Vaughan: "I got up in the morning to breakfast along with the man's wife. I never went out of the parlour, only through the parlour, I read the newspaper before I went out of the house..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Vaughan      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for forgery: Robert Eddington: "we occasionally read the newspaper, I suppose we sat for half an hour..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Eddington      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft: Charles Fenn: "I went into Mrs Bow's public house, the sign of the Wheat-sheaf, Holywell-street. I put my bankers book on the table, called for a glass of ale, I took up the newspaper; I staid in the house about five minutes, put down the newspaper and went out..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Fenn      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft: Mr Hanley: "About eleven o'clock it rained very hard. I stopped at the public house, reading the newspaper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hanley      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

prisoner's statement in trial for theft: Brown: "I was going to the West India Dock, I had a newspaper in my handing reading of it, and when I got into the court I was reading of it..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Brown      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft: Samuel Leigh: "I lodge at the Elephant and Castle, Holborn. On the 12th of October I was sitting in the tap-room breakfasting...after I had finished my breakfast I removed two or three yards to look at a newspaper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Leigh      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft/ receiving stolen goods: William de Roach: "In the middle of August I was in Pollard's Parlour, Pollard was reading the newspaper, he saw these things advertised and said 'they have got a good booty', I made answer, 'I think they have'."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Pollard      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft/ receiving stolen goods: William de Roach: "Then the week following Mrs Rippen came down several times and asked what such stones and such ear-rings were worth. Then after she came down and made these enquiries, then Pollard sent for the same newspaper, and on his reading the same paper, she said, 'I think these things are upstairs'."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Pollard      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft: William Pocock: "On the night of the 8th of January I was at the King's Head... I took up the newspaper, and while I was reading the newspaper I saw him put the pint pot in his pocket, under his great coat..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Pocock      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for murder: Henry Bracken: "I caused hom to be apprehended. I read the description of him in the newspaper and caused him to be taken up"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Bracken      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for deception/forgery: John Dougan: "I was going to the West Indies, in pursuance of that my business. I had occasion for an interpreter; I advertised for that purpose, and the prisoner applied in consequence of that advertisement. He represented himself as having been in business at Liverpool... A newspaper happened to be present, and he immediately, without hesitation, translated a passage, first into German, then French, then English, and proved to me that he was well skilled in languages."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anthony McKenrott      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft: Michael McNally: "Jack brought a newspaper to me, and read a statement that Cooper was apprehended upon this, and he said that Messrs Winchester had offered a large reward, and he told me to keep my tongue quit, and all would be right..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John (Jack) Winter      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Morning Advertiser

witness statement in trial for burglary: Ralph Hope: "[Spencer] was apprehended and committed for examination. In about a fortnight after, I saw an advertisement in the Morning Advertiser. [Witness here produces that newspaper and reads it to the court]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Hope      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

witness statement in trial for theft: George Nash: "I was never in the house before... I only staid while I drank my beer -I looked at the newspaper. I was not there above a quarter of an hour"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Nash      Print: Newspaper

  

Pliny : Epistolarum

"W[ordsworth]'s comment to C[oleridge] in 1802 suggests a first reading of Pliny's letters years before ... 'I remeber having the same opinion of Plinys [sic] letters which you have express'd when I read them many years ago.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Ann Radcliffe : The Italian

"Attacking W[ordsworth]'s 'one-sidedness' in 1840, De Quincey records: 'One of Mrs Radcliffe's romances, viz. 'The Italian,' he had, by some strange accident, read, - read, but only to laugh at it ... '"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Clarissa

"Christopher Wordsworth Jr. wrote of W[ordsworth]: 'The week before he took his degree he passed his time in reading Clarissa Harlowe.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Coxe : Lettres de M. William Coxe a M. W. Melmoth sur l'etat politique, civil, et naturel de la Suisse; traduits de l'Anglaise, et augmentees des observations faites dans le meme pays par le traducteur

"W[ordsworth] owned and read the French translation of Coxe during his residence in France, 1791-2."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

George Redpath : The Border History of England and Scotland

"In 1843, W[ordsworth] recalled his research for The Borderers: ' ... having a wish to colour the manners in some degree from local history more than my knowledge enabled me to do I read Redpath's history of the Borders but found there nothing to my purpose.'"

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Marie Jeanne Roland de la Platiere : An Appeal to Impartial Posterity, by Citizeness Roland

"[Thomas] Poole read the Appeal in March 1796; writing to Henrietta Warwick on 2 April, he revealed that 'I have lately perused with much delight La Citoyenne Roland.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Poole      Print: Book

  

Marie Jeanne Roland de la Platiere : An Appeal to Impartial Posterity, by Citizeness Roland

" ... in March 1796 D[orothy] W[ordsworth] reported that 'I have also read lately Madame Roland's Memoirs, Louvet and some other french things - very entertaining.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Jean-Baptiste Louvet de Couvray : Narrative of the Dangers to Which I have been Exposed, since the 31st of May, 1793. With historical memorandums. By Jean-Baptiste Louvet, one of the representatives proscribed in 1793. Now President of the National Convention.

" ... in March 1796 D[orothy] W[ordsworth] reported that 'I have also read lately Madame Roland's Memoirs, Louvet and some other french things - very entertaining.'"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller : The Robbers

"[S. T.] C[oleridge] stayed up until one o'clock in the morning to read Tytler's translation of The Robbers ... "

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Southey : Joan of Arc

'Southey, W[ordsworth] told [William] Mathews in Oct. 1795, "is about publishing an epic poem on the subject of the Maid of orleans. From the specimens I have seen I am inclined to think it will have many beauties."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Lawrence Sterne : Tristram Shandy

'In his letter to [William] Mathews of 3 Aug. 1791, W[ordsworth] somewhat effacingly claims only to have read "in our language three volumes of Tristram Shandy, and two or three papers of the Spectator."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : Spectator, The

'In his letter to [William] Mathews of 3 Aug. 1791, W[ordsworth] somewhat effacingly claims only to have read "in our language three volumes of Tristram Shandy, and two or three papers of the Spectator."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Weekly Entertainer, The

'W[ordsworth] read "Christian's own Account of the Mutiny on Board his Majesty's Ship Bounty, commanded by Captain Bligh, of which he was the Ringleader" in The Weekly Entertainer 28 (26 Sept. 1796), some time in Sept. or Oct. 1796.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Uvedale Price : Essay on the Picturesque

"My Brother has read Mr Price's Book on the picturesque ... "

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

'Mary has been reading to us (I stopped writing to hear it) the account of the death of Mr. Pitt - happy for him that he had died at this time!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Philip Massinger : Bashful Lover, The

'I have read only one play, the Bashful Lover and one or two of Plutarch's lives since we wrote last.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Plutarch : Lives

'I have read only one play, the Bashful Lover and one or two of Plutarch's lives since we wrote last.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Clarkson : Portraiture of Quakerism as taken from a view of the Moral Education, Descriptions, Peculiar Customs, Religious Principles, Political and Civil Oeconomy and Character of the Society of Friends

Dorothy Wordsworth describes receiving only 'two last volumes' of 'Mr Clarkson's Book': 'we may yet have to wait a fortnight or three weeks for the other [received by William Wordsworth at a separate address (Basil Montagu's)] ... We have determined not to read the Book till we can begin at the beginning, so I have done little more than turn over the leaves ... I think it is a very well-looking Book, with enough of stuff in each page, not too large margins, and a good type. As to the matter, it looks very nice, (I have heard you say that you can judge of a book in turning over the leaves) and I have read some very sweetly written bits.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Richard Payne Knight : An Analytical Enquiry into the Principles of Taste

'I have just begun to read Mr Knight's Book, which you were very kind in sending.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Lady Beaumont : [letter]

Dorothy Wordsworth describes to Lady Beaumont how she received a letter from her: 'A few minutes before your letter arrived, William [Wordsworth] had set forward with his Daughter on his back, and our little Nursemaid and I were on foot following after, all on our road over the high mountain pass betwixt Grasmere and Patterdale, by which road we were going to Park House to remove the Child from the danger of catching the hooping-cough which is prevalent at Grasmere. The letter was sent after us and we halted by the way-side to read it ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William and Dorothy Wordsworth     Manuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Clarkson : Portraiture of Quakerism as taken from a View of the Moral Education, Descriptions, Peculiar Customs, Religious Principles, Political and Civil OEconomy and Character of the Society of Friends.

'W[illia]m [Wordsworth] has read most of Mr Clarkson's book and has been much pleased, but he complains of the second volume being exceedingly disfigured by perpetual use of the word tract.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : [newspaper]

William Wordsworth: 'I read in the papers with great pain the account of Mungo Park's disastrous end ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

John Fox : Book of Martyrs

'I have been reading Fox's Book of Martyrs - not straight forward; but choice parts, it is a very interesting Book The account of the deaths of Ridley and Latimer (especially the latter) is most affecting and impressive. There are some very sweet passages in them, yet I do not think the whole of such merit that they ought to have been published.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Gray : Life and Letters

'I am now reading Gray's life and letters.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : [newspapers]

'I hope the execrable Murderer will prove to have been an Irishman; the Scotch much to their honour have hitherto been little tainted by that detestable crime. I had read of it, though not the particulars, in the newspapers, and had been very much shocked.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'I often think of the happy evening when, by your fireside, my Brother read to us the first book of the Paradise lost ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Hutchinson : Memoirs of Colonel Hutchinson

'We received the Books a week ago ... We have all already to thank you for a great deal of delight which we have received from them. In the first place my Brother and Sister have read the Life of Colonel Hutchinson, which is a most valuable and interesting Book. - My Brother speaks of it with unqualified approbation, and he intends to read it over again.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

D. Thiebault : Anecdotes of Frederick II

'We received the Books a week ago ... We have all already to thank you for a great deal of delight which we have received from them ... I have not quite finished the anecdotes of Frederick which I find exceedingly amusing; and instructive, also, as giving a lively portrait of the hard-heartedness and selfishness, and servility of the courtiers of a tyrant, and of the unsatisfactoriness of such a life.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Lucy Hutchinson : Memoirs of Colonel Hutchinson

'We travelled ... to Nottingham, where we walked about and viewed the Castle and town, an interesting old place, and particularly so to us at that time having just read Mrs Hutchinson's account of the troubles there in Oliver Cromwell's time.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Clarissa, or The History of a Young Lady

'Clarissa Harlowe was not more interesting [than Thomas Clarkson, The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the African Slave-Trade] when I first read it at 14 years of age.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Clarkson : History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, The

'We had read his [Thomas Clarkson's] book ... William [Wordsworth] I believe made a few remarks upon paper, but he had not time for much criticism, and in fact having only one perusal of the work he was too much interested.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Dunham Whitaker : History and Antiquities of the Deanery of Craven, The

'I cannot express how much pleasure my Brother has already received from Dr. Whitaker's Books, though they have been only two days in his possession - Almost the whole time he has been greedily devouring the History of Craven ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : Edinburgh Review

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson: 'You had been strangely misinformed of the nature of the Edinburgh Review of William [Wordsworth]'s poems [ie his Poems in Two Volumes, 1807]. Luckily Lloyd takes it in, therefore I have seen it. W[illia]m and M[ary Wordsworth] chanced to see it at Penrith ... the review is ... plainly so spiteful, that it can do no harm with any wise or feeling mind; and for me, I have not laughed so heartily this long time as I did at the reading of it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Edinburgh Review

William Wordsworth to Walter Scott: 'In passing through Penrith I had an opportunity of seeing his [Francis Jeffrey's] last Review [of Wordsworth's Poems on Two Volumes, in the Edinburgh Review]. I had before skimmed over, some time ago, what he had written in the article on [Southey's] Thalaba [in Oct. 1802] ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Wordsworth : [poems]

William Wordsworth describes coach journey from London, having already observed that the coach guard was a former grocer on his first day in the new job: 'At Lancaster I happened to mention Grasmere in the hearing of one of the Passengers, who asked me immediately if one Wordsworth did not live there. I answered, "Yes." - "He has written," said he, "some very beautiful Poems; The Critics do indeed cry out against them, and condemn them as over simple, but for my part I read them with great pleasure, they are natural and true." - This man was also a Grocer.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: [a grocer] Anon      

  

Symmonds : Life of John Milton, The

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'I have read your quondam Friend's, Dr. Symmonds' life of Milton, on some future occasion I will tell you what I think of it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Wordsworth : White Doe of Rylstone, The

'In compliance with frequent entreaties I took the MSS [of The White Doe of Rylstone] to [Charles] Lamb's to read it, or part of it, one evening. There unluckily I found [William] Hazlitt and his Beloved [Sarah Stoddart] ... though I had the Poem in my hand I ... absolutely refused, to read it. But as they were very earnest in entreating me, I at last consented to read one Book ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Francis Wrangham : Human Laws best supported by the Gospel

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'I have read your sermon [Human Laws best supported by the Gospel] (which I lately received from Longman) with much pleasure. I only gave it a cursory perusal, for since it arrived my family has been in great confusion, we having removed to another House, in which we are not yet half settled. The Appendix I had received before in a frank, and of that I feel more entitled to speak, because I had read it more at leisure [goes on to discuss this in detail].'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Walter Scott : Marmion

William Wordsworth to Walter Scott: 'Thank you for Marmion which I have read with lively pleasure ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

John Dryden : unknown

William Wordsworth to Walter Scott: 'I had a peep at your edition of Dryden - I had not time to read the Notes which would have interested me most, namely the historical and illustrative ones; but some of the critical introductions I read ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Andrew Bell : Experiment in Education made at the Asylum of Madras, An

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'Since I wrote to you I have read Dr Bell's Book upon Education ... it is a most interesting work and entitles him to the fervent gratitude of all good men: but I cannot say [?it has made] any material change in my views ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Gilbert White : Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne

'I remember reading White's Natural History and Antiquities of Selborn[e] with great pleasure when a Boy at school ...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Dunham Whitaker : History of the Original Parish of Whalley, and Honour of Clitheroe, The

' ... I have lately read Dr. Whitaker's history of ... Whalley both with profit and pleasure.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Grave : The History and Antiquities of Cleveland in the North Riding of Yorkshire

William Wordsworth suggests to Francis Wrangham that he attempt to write a local history: 'I am induced to mention it from a belief that you are admirably qualified for such a work ... and from a regret in seeing works of this kind ... utterly marred by falling into the hands of wretched Bunglers, e.g. the History of Cleveland whiich I have just read, by a Clergyman of Yarm by the name of Grave, the most heavy performance I ever encountered ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Francis Wrangham : Gospel best promulgated in National Schools, The

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'Your sermon [The Gospel best promulgated by National Schools] did not reach me till the night before last. I believe we all have read it, and are much pleased with it.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

unknown : [Greek book]

Dorothy Wordsworth writes to Catherine Clarkson on 'Thursday Evening December 8th [1808]': 'Mr. De Quincey ... is beside me, quietly turning over the leaves of a Greek book ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      Print: Book

  

Thomas De Quincey : letter

Dorothy Wordsworth describes to Thomas De Quincey how she and her brother William received a letter from him: "Yesterday morning my brother and I walked to Rydale, and he ... sate upon a stump at the foot of the hill while I went up to Ann Nicholson's, and there I found your letter ... I opened the letter in Ann's house just to see if all were well with you, and I then hastened with my prize to William, and sat down beside him to read the letter, and truly a feast it was for us ... "

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: William and Dorothy Wordsworth     Manuscript: Letter

  

Thomas De Quincey : Letter

Dorothy Wordsworth describes to Thomas De Quincey how John Wordsworth received a letter from him: "When your Friend Johnny came from school last night, his mother said to him, 'Here is a letter from - .' 'From,' he replied, 'Mr. De Quincey?' ... he ... asked me to read [it]; which I did, with a few omissions and levelling the language to his capacity ... you would have thought yourself well repaid for the trouble of writing it if you could only have seen how feelingly he was interested."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

[Italian deputies] Anon : [address to Buonaparte]

William Wordsworth to Thomas De Quincey, regarding editing of The Convention of Cintra: 'I have alluded to the blasphemous address to Buonaparte made by some Italian deputies, which you remember we read at Grasmere some time ago, and his answer; I should like to have referred to the very words in the Appendix ... If ... you could find it in the file of Couriers at the office, I should exceedingly like such parts as you might approve of ... to be inserted ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth and Thomas De Quincey     Print: Serial / periodical

  

Don Pedro Cevallos : Exposition of the Arts and Machinations which led to the Usurpation of the Crown of Spain ...

'I have read Cevallos; also I have read Miss Smith's Translation of Klopstock's and Mrs. K's letters [goes on to express preference for Mrs Klopstock's letters over those of her husband].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

unknown : Memoir of Frederick and Margaret Klopstock

'I have read Cevallos; also I have read Miss Smith's Translation of Klopstock's and Mrs. K's letters [goes on to express preference for Mrs Klopstock's letters over those of her husband].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

unknown : [newpapers]

'I have seen a hint in one of the Papers about some letters of [General Sir] David Baird to the same tune as [Sir John] Moore's [about the Peninsular Campaign].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : Christabel

'I ... found Miss [Sara] Hutchinson reading Coleridge's Christabel to Johnny [Wordsworth] - She was tired, so I read the greater part of it: he was excessively interested especially with the first part ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson and Dorothy Wordsworth     

  

 : Edinburgh Review

Dorothy Wordsworth reflects on prospect that her brother William might turn to newspaper journalism for a living: 'This reminds me of the last Edinburgh Review which I saw at Mr. Wilson's. There never was such a compound of despicable falsehood, malevolence and folly as the concluding part of the Review of Burns's Poems (which was ... all that I thought it worth while to read being the only part in which my Brother's works are alluded to).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Wordsworth : White Doe of Rylstone, The

'Mr. Wilson came to us on Saturday morning and stayed till Sunday afternoon - William [Wordsworth] read the White Doe; and Coleridge's Christabel to him, with both of which he was much delighted.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : Christabel

'Mr. Wilson came to us on Saturday morning and stayed till Sunday afternoon - William [Wordsworth] read the White Doe; and Coleridge's Christabel to him, with both of which he was much delighted.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

unknown : [magazine]

'I have just been reading an old Magazine where I find that Benjamin Flower was fined ?100 and imprisoned in Newgate four months ... for a libel, as it was termed, upon the Bishop of Llandaff ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[n/a] : Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper

Henry Mayhew's interview with a seller of street stationery: 'I read "Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper" on a Sunday, and what murders and robberies there is now!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Newspaper

  

Virgil : Georgics

'Here I am reading Virgil?s delightful Georgics for the first time. They really attune perfectly well with the plains and climate of Naseby. Valpy (whose edition I have) cannot quite follow Virgil?s plough?in its construction at least. But the main acts of agriculture seem to have changed very little, and the alternation of green and corn crops is a good dodge. And while I heard the fellows going out with their horses to plough as I sat at breakfast this morning, I also read? Libra die somnique pares ubi fecerit horas, Et medium luci atque umbris jam dividit orbem, Exercete, viri, tauros, serite hordea campis Usque sub extremum brum? intractabilis imbrem. One loves Virgil somehow.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

Arthur Penryn Stanley : Life of Thomas Arnold D.D, Headmaster of Rugby

As I have no people to tell you of, so have I very few books, and know nothing of what is stirring in the literary world. I have read the Life of Arnold of Rugby, who was a noble fellow; and the letters of Burke, which do not add to, or detract from, what I knew and liked in him before. I am meditating to begin Thucydides one day; perhaps this winter. . .

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

Edmund Burke : Letters

As I have no people to tell you of, so have I very few books, and know nothing of what is stirring in the literary world. I have read the Life of Arnold of Rugby, who was a noble fellow; and the letters of Burke, which do not add to, or detract from, what I knew and liked in him before. I am meditating to begin Thucydides one day; perhaps this winter. . .

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

Virgil : 

I have been reading in my Boat?Virgil, Juvenal, and Wesley?s Journal. Do you know the last? one of the most interesting Books, I think, in the Language. It is curious to think of his Diary extending over nearly the same time as Walpole?s Letters, which, you know, are a sort of Diary. What two different Lives, Pursuits, and Topics!

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

Juvenal : 

I have been reading in my Boat?Virgil, Juvenal, and Wesley?s Journal. Do you know the last? one of the most interesting Books, I think, in the Language. It is curious to think of his Diary extending over nearly the same time as Walpole?s Letters, which, you know, are a sort of Diary. What two different Lives, Pursuits, and Topics!

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

John Wesley : Journal

I have been reading in my Boat?Virgil, Juvenal, and Wesley?s Journal. Do you know the last? one of the most interesting Books, I think, in the Language. It is curious to think of his Diary extending over nearly the same time as Walpole?s Letters, which, you know, are a sort of Diary. What two different Lives, Pursuits, and Topics!

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

Horace Walpole : Letters

I have been reading in my Boat?Virgil, Juvenal, and Wesley?s Journal. Do you know the last? one of the most interesting Books, I think, in the Language. It is curious to think of his Diary extending over nearly the same time as Walpole?s Letters, which, you know, are a sort of Diary. What two different Lives, Pursuits, and Topics!

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Fitzgerald      Print: Book

  

Charles Knight : Half Hours with the Best Authors

'Some one by chance read out to me the other day at the seaside your account of poor old Naseby Village from Cromwell, quoted in Knight?s "Half Hours, etc." It is now twelve years ago, at this very season, I was ransacking for you; you promising to come down, and never coming. I hope very much you are soon going to give us something: else Jerrold and Tupper carry all before them.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Julius Caesar

[Macaulay's marginalia by the conversation in the street between Brutus and Cassius, in the First Act of Julius Caesar] "These two or three pages are worth the whole French drama ten times over."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Julius Caesar

[Macaulay's marginalia at the end of Julius Caesar] "The last scenes are huddled up, and affect me less than Plutarch's narrative. But the working up of Brutus by Cassius, the meeting of the conspirators, the stirring of the mob by Antony, and (above all,) the dispute and reconciliation of the two generals, are things far beyond the reach of any other poet that ever lived."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Julius Caesar

[Macaulay's marginalia by the lines "Let me have men about me that are fat/ Sleek headed men, and such as sleep o' nights" in Julius Caesar] "Plutarch's hint is admirably expanded here".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

G.W.M. Reynolds : The Mysteries of London

Henry Mayhew interviews "educated" costermongers who read fiction aloud to groups of costermongers in the courts they inhabit; long account of the comments made by illiterate costermongers when cheap serials are read to them, comments on the story lines they like, characters and illustrations; reading of G.W.M. Reynolds's "Mysteries" and Edward Lloyd's penny bloods

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Serial / periodical

  

G.W.M. Reynolds : The Mysteries of the Court of London

Henry Mayhew interviews "educated" costermongers who read fiction aloud to groups of costermongers in the courts they inhabit; long account of the comments made by illiterate costermongers when cheap serials are read to them, comments on the story lines they like, characters and illustrations; reading of G.W.M. Reynolds's "Mysteries" and Edward Lloyd's penny bloods

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Edward Lloyd : [various titles published by Lloyd]

Henry Mayhew interviews 'educated' costermongers who read fiction aloud to groups of costermongers in the courts they inhabit; long account of the comments made by illiterate costermongers when cheap serials are read to them, comments on the story lines they like, characters and illustrations; reading of G.W.M. Reynolds's "Mysteries" and Edward Lloyd's penny bloods

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Garden of Heaven

Henry Mayhew's interview with an orphan flower girl and her sister: "'We've always had good health. We can all read'. [Here the three somewhat insisted upon proving to me their proficiency in reading, and having procured a Roman Catholic book, the 'Garden of Heaven', they read very well."

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : History of England

Henry Mayhew interviews a sweet-stuff maker: "One of the appliances of the sweet-stuff trade which I saw in the room of seller before mentioned was -Acts of Parliament. A pile of these, a foot or more deep, lay on a shelf. They are used to wrap up the rock, etc, sold. The sweet-stuff maker bought his 'paper' of the stationers or at the old bookshops. Sometimes, he said, he got works in this way in sheets which had never been cut, and which he retained to read at his short intervals of leisure, and then used to wrap his goods in. In this way he had read through two Histories of England!"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, uncut sheets

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a long-song seller: to sell ballads he not only cries their titles, but also sings the songs he has for sale in print. "I sometimes begin with singing or trying to sing, for I'm no vocalist, the first few words of any song, and them quite loud..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Broadsheet, broadside ballads

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a running patterer -seller of broadsheets mainly dealing with crime and breaking news, sometimes also 'cocks' or fiction. Patterer's seeling techniques include chanting part of text of sheets to potential purchasers to induce sale

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Broadsheet

  

Oliver Goldsmith : Edwin and Angelina

Henry Mayhew interviews a street author or street poet: "I was very fond of reading poems in my youth, as soon as I could read and understand almost. Yes, very likely sir; perhaps it was that put it into my head to write them afterwards... I was very fond of Goldsmith's poetry always. I can repeat 'Edwin and Emma' now. No sir; I never read the 'Vicar of Wakefield'. I found 'Edwin and Emma' in a book called the 'Speaker'. I often thought of it in travelling through some parts of the country." + recites some of his own poetry to Mayhew

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'cheap John': "From selling the printed songs, I imbibed a wish to learn to read, and, with the assistance of an old soldier, I soon acquired sufficient knowledge to make out the names of each song, and shortly afterwards I could study a song and learn the words without anyone helping me."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Broadsheet, broadside ballads

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a blind female seller of 'small wares', the conversation turns to her younger son: "My youngest son -he's now fourteen -is asthmatical; but he's such a good lad, so easily satisfied. He likes to read if he can get hold of a penny book, and has time to read it. He's at a paper-stainer's and works on fancy satin paper, which is very obnicious to such a delicate boy"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Broadsheet, Serial / periodical, penny book

  

[n/a] : Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper

Henry Mayhew interviews a street buyer of waste paper: "The only worldly labour I do on a Sunday is to take my family's dinner to the bakehouse, bring it home after chapel, and read Lloyd's Weekly"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Broadsheet, Newspaper

  

 : Examiner

Henry Mayhew interviews a fancy cabinet-maker "...one elderly and very intelligent man, a first rate artisan in skill, told me he had been so reduced in the world by the underselling of slop masters , that though in his youth he could take in the 'News' and 'Examiner' papers (each he believed 9d at the time, but was not certain), he could afford, and enjoyed, no reading when I saw him last autumn, beyond the book-leaves in which he received his quarter of cheese, his small piece of bacon or fresh meat, or his saveloys; and his wife schemed to go to the shops who 'wrapped up their things from books', in order that he might have something to read after his day's work."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Broadsheet, Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

 : Daily News

Henry Mayhew interviews a fancy cabinet-maker "...one elderly and very intelligent man, a first rate artisan in skill, told me he had been so reduced in the world by the underselling of slop masters , that though in his youth he could take in the 'News' and 'Examiner' papers (each he believed 9d at the time, but was not certain), he could afford, and enjoyed, no reading when I saw him last autumn, beyond the book-leaves in which he received his quarter of cheese, his small piece of bacon or fresh meat, or his saveloys; and his wife schemed to go to the shops who 'wrapped up their things from books', in order that he might have something to read after his day's work."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Broadsheet, Newspaper

  

 : various

Henry Mayhew interviews a fancy cabinet-maker "...one elderly and very intelligent man, a first rate artisan in skill, told me he had been so reduced in the world by the underselling of slop masters , that though in his youth he could take in the 'News' and 'Examiner' papers (each he believed 9d at the time, but was not certain), he could afford, and enjoyed, no reading when I saw him last autumn, beyond the book-leaves in which he received his quarter of cheese, his small piece of bacon or fresh meat, or his saveloys; and his wife schemed to go to the shops who 'wrapped up their things from books', in order that he might have something to read after his day's work."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, leaves from books used to wrap food purchases

  

n/a : [newspaper]

Henry Mayhew interviews a regular scavager: "No, I can't say I was sorry when I was forced to be idle that way, that I hadn't kept up my reading, nor tried to keep it up, because I couldn't then have settled down my mind to read; I know I couldn't. I likes to hear the paper read well enough, if I's resting; but old Bill, as often volunteers to read, has to spell the hard words, so that one can't tell what the devil he's reading about."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Bill      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews an "aristocratic" crossing sweeper of Cavendish-square: "There was the Earl of Gainsborough as I should like you to mention as well, please sir. He lived in Chandos-street, and was a particular nice man and very religious. He always gave me a shilling and a tract. Well, you see, I did often read the tract; they was all religious, and about where your souls was to go to -very good, you know, what there was, very good; and he used to buy 'em wholesale at a little shop, corner of High-street, Marrenbum."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Billy ?      Print: religious tract

  

John Bunyan : Pilgrim's Progress

Henry Mayhew interviews a crossing sweeper: "Sometimes, after I get home, I read a book, if I can borrow one. What do I read? Well, novels, when I can get them. What did I read last night? Well, Reynolds's Miscellany; before that I read the Pilgrim's Progress. I have read it three times over; but there's always something new in it."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

G.W.M. Reynolds : Reynolds's Miscellany

Henry Mayhew interviews a crossing sweeper: "Sometimes, after I get home, I read a book, if I can borrow one. What do I read? Well, novels, when I can get them. What did I read last night? Well, Reynolds's Miscellany; before that I read the Pilgrim's Progress. I have read it three times over; but there's always something new in it."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a crossing sweeper: "Sometimes, after I get home, I read a book, if I can borrow one. What do I read? Well, novels, when I can get them. What did I read last night? Well, Reynolds's Miscellany; before that I read the Pilgrim's Progress. I have read it three times over; but there's always something new in it."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, novels

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a female crossing sweeper: "When my sight was better I used to be very partial to reading; but I can't see the print now, sir. I used to read the bible and the newspaper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary      Print: Newspaper

  

 : The Bible

Henry Mayhew interviews a female crossing sweeper: "When my sight was better I used to be very partial to reading; but I can't see the print now, sir. I used to read the bible and the newspaper..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary ?      Print: Book

  

Daniel Defoe : Robinson Crusoe

Henry Mayhew interviews a female crossing sweeper: "When my sight was better I used to be very partial to reading; but I can't see the print now, sir. I used to read the bible and the newspaper. Story books I have read too, but not many novels. Yes, Robinson Crusoe I know..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary      Print: Book

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a female crossing sweeper: "When my sight was better I used to be very partial to reading; but I can't see the print now, sir. I used to read the bible and the newspaper. Story books I have read too, but not many novels. Yes, Robinson Crusoe I know..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary      Print: Book, story books

  

 : London Journal

Henry Mayhew interviews a juvenile crossing sweeper: "I can read and write -oh, yes, I mean read and write well -read anything, even old English; and I write pretty fair, -though I don't get much reading now, unless it's a penny paper -I've got one in my pocket now -it's the London Journal -there's a tale in it now about two brothers, and one of them steals the child away and puts another in his place, and then he gets found out, and all that, and he's just falling off a bridge now..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Family Friend

Henry Mayhew interviews a penny mouse-trap maker (cripple): "My daughter is eighteen and my son eleven; that is my boy, sir; he's reading the Family Friend just now. My boy goes to school every evening, and twice on a Sunday. I am willing that they should find as much pleasure from reading as I have in my illness"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

Henry Mayhew interviews a penny mouse-trap maker (cripple): "I found books often lull my pain... I can't afford them no, for I have no wish to incur any extraneous expense, while the weight of the labour lies on my family more than it does on myself. Over and over again, when I have been in acute pain with my thigh, a scientific book, or a work on history, or a volume of travels, would carry my thoughts far away ...I always had love of solid works. For an hour's light reading, I have often turned to a work of imagination, such as Milton's Paradise Lost, and Shakespeare's plays; but I prefer science to poetry... I think it is solely due to my taste for mechanics and my love of reading scientific books that I am able to live so comfortably as I do in my affliction."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a penny mouse-trap maker (cripple): "I found books often lull my pain... I can't afford them no, for I have no wish to incur any extraneous expense, while the weight of the labour lies on my family more than it does on myself. Over and over again, when I have been in acute pain with my thigh, a scientific book, or a work on history, or a volume of travels, would carry my thoughts far away ...I always had love of solid works. For an hour's light reading, I have often turned to a work of imagination, such as Milton's Paradise Lost, and Shakespeare's plays; but I prefer science to poetry... I think it is solely due to my taste for mechanics and my love of reading scientific books that I am able to live so comfortably as I do in my affliction."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a penny mouse-trap maker (cripple): "I found books often lull my pain... I can't afford them no, for I have no wish to incur any extraneous expense, while the weight of the labour lies on my family more than it does on myself. Over and over again, when I have been in acute pain with my thigh, a scientific book, or a work on history, or a volume of travels, would carry my thoughts far away ...I always had love of solid works. For an hour's light reading, I have often turned to a work of imagination, such as Milton's Paradise Lost, and Shakespeare's plays; but I prefer science to poetry... I think it is solely due to my taste for mechanics and my love of reading scientific books that I am able to live so comfortably as I do in my affliction."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : Gospel

Henry Mayhew interviews a street entertainer -a 'blind reader': "I was not born blind, but lost my sight four years ago, in consequence of an aneurism... At last I thought I might earn a little by reading in the street. The Society for the Indigent Blind gave me the Gospel of St John, after Mr Freer's system, the price being 8s.; and a brother-in-law supplied me with the Gospel of St Luke which cost 9s. ...I first read in public in Mornington Crescent. For the first fortnight or three weeks I took from 2s6d to 2s9d a day... Since the 1st of January I haven't averaged more than 2s6d a week by my street reading and writing... There are now five or six blind men about London who read in the streets. We can read nothing but the Scriptures, as 'blind-printing' -so it's sometimes called -has only been used in the Scriptures."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'vagrant' of 18 years of age: "Of a night some one would now and then read hymns, out of books they sold about the streets -I'm sure they were hymns; or else we'd read stories about Jack Sheppard and Dick Turpin, and all through that set..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, religious tracts sold in streets containing hymns

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'vagrant' of 18 years of age: "Of a night ...we'd read stories about Jack Sheppard and Dick Turpin, and all through that set. They were large thick books, borrowed from the library. They told how they used to break open the houses, and get out of Newgate, and how Dick got away to York. We used to think Jack and them very fine fellows. I wished I could be like Jack (I did then), about the blankets in his escape, and that old house in West-street -it is a ruin still."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Rookwood

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'vagrant' of 18 years of age: "Of a night ...we'd read stories about Jack Sheppard and Dick Turpin, and all through that set. They were large thick books, borrowed from the library. They told how they used to break open the houses, and get out of Newgate, and how Dick got away to York. We used to think Jack and them very fine fellows. I wished I could be like Jack (I did then), about the blankets in his escape, and that old house in West-street -it is a ruin still."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Watts : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

John Wesley : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : religious magazines

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Clark : Lives of Pirates

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, numbers collected into volume by library?

  

 : Tales of Shipwrecks

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical, probably penny numbers

  

 : Family Herald

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Windsor Castle

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, unsure if penny numbers or book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : The Tower of London

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 16, a vagrant and inmate of a casual ward of a London workhouse: "My father had no books but religious books; they were all of a religious turn, and what people might think dull. But they never made me dull. I read Wesley's and Watt's hymns, and religious magazines of different connexions. I had a natural inclination for the sae, and would like to get to it now. I've read a good deal about it since -Clark's 'Lives of Pirates', 'Tales of Shipwrecks', and other things in penny numbers (Clark's I got out of the library though). I was what people called a deep boy for a book; and am still. Whenever I had a penny, after I got a bellyful of victuals, it went for a book, but I haven't bought many lately. I did buy one yesterday -the 'Family Herald' -one I often read when I can get it. There's good reading in it; it elevates your mind -anybody that has a mind for studying. It has good tales in it... I've read "Windsor Castle" and "The Tower", -they're by the same man. I Liked "Windsor Castle" and all about Henry VIII and Herne and Hunter. It's a book that's connected with history, and that's a good thing. I like adventurous tales."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, unsure if penny numbers or book

  

 : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 17, an inmate of a London workhouse: "I thought I should make my fortune in London -I'd heard it was such a grand place. I had read in novels and romances -halfpenny and penny books -about such things, but I've met with nothing of the kind."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, penny books

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Henry Mayhew interviews a boy of 17, an inmate of a London workhouse: "I've read 'Jack Sheppard' through, in three volumes; and I used to tell stories out of that sometimes."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'London sneak or common thief': "On Sunday evenings the only books read were such as 'Jack Sheppard', 'Dick Turpin' and the 'Newgate Calendar', they got out of the neighbouring libraries by depositing 1s. These were read with much interest; the lodgers would sooner have these than any other books."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Rookwood

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'London sneak or common thief': "On Sunday evenings the only books read were such as 'Jack Sheppard', 'Dick Turpin' and the 'Newgate Calendar', they got out of the neighbouring libraries by depositing 1s. These were read with much interest; the lodgers would sooner have these than any other books."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : Newgate Calendar

Henry Mayhew interviews a 'London sneak or common thief': "On Sunday evenings the only books read were such as 'Jack Sheppard', 'Dick Turpin' and the 'Newgate Calendar', they got out of the neighbouring libraries by depositing 1s. These were read with much interest; the lodgers would sooner have these than any other books."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

 : Bible

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "I went to school to learn to write and cipher, and had before this learned to read at home with my father and mother. We had a very happy home and very strict in the way of religion... My father had family worship every night between 8 and 9 o'clock, when the curtains were drawn over the windows, the candle was lighted, and each of the children was taught to kneel separately at prayer. After reading the Bible, and half an hour's conversation, each one retired to their bed..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

 : Bible

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "...We often had ministers to dinner and supper at our house, and always after their meals the conversation would be sure to turn into discussions on the different points of doctrine... At this time I would be sitting there greedily drinking in every word, and as soon as they were gone I would fly to the Bible and examine the different texts of Scripture they had brought forward, and it seemed to produce a feeling in my mind that any religious opinions could be supported by it..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Thomas Paine : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "...I have read Paine, and Valney, and Holyoake, those infidel writers, and have also read the works of Bulwer, Dickens and numbers of others..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Volney : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "...I have read Paine, and Valney, and Holyoake, those infidel writers, and have also read the works of Bulwer, Dickens and numbers of others..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

George Jacob Holyoake : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "...I have read Paine, and Valney, and Holyoake, those infidel writers, and have also read the works of Bulwer, Dickens and numbers of others..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Edward Bulwer-Lytton : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "...I have read Paine, and Valney, and Holyoake, those infidel writers, and have also read the works of Bulwer, Dickens and numbers of others..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

Charles Dickens : 

Henry Mayhew interviews a former London pickpocket, turned patterer; grew up in Shropshire, father a Wesleyan minister: "...I have read Paine, and Valney, and Holyoake, those infidel writers, and have also read the works of Bulwer, Dickens and numbers of others..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

John Keats : 'Ode to a Nightingale'

'[Muir's] account of his reading material as a young man in Glasgow points to an involvement with poems of the Romantic and post-Romantic periods which were concerned both with visionary experience and with the need to transcend human suffering. He tells us: I was enchanted by The Solitary Reaper, the Ode to a Nightingale, the Ode to the West Wind, The Lotus Eaters, and the chorus from Atalanta in Calydon'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Unknown

  

Alfred Lord Tennyson : 'The Lotus Eaters'

'[Muir's] account of his reading material as a young man in Glasgow points to an involvement with poems of the Romantic and post-Romantic periods which were concerned both with visionary experience and with the need to transcend human suffering. He tells us: I was enchanted by The Solitary Reaper, the Ode to a Nightingale, the Ode to the West Wind, The Lotus Eaters, and the chorus from Atalanta in Calydon'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Unknown

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : 'Ode to the West Wind'

'[Muir's] account of his reading material as a young man in Glasgow points to an involvement with poems of the Romantic and post-Romantic periods which were concerned both with visionary experience and with the need to transcend human suffering. He tells us: I was enchanted by The Solitary Reaper, the Ode to a Nightingale, the Ode to the West Wind, The Lotus Eaters, and the chorus from Atalanta in Calydon'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Unknown

  

Algernon Charles Swinburne : 'Atalanta in Calydon'

'[Muir's] account of his reading material as a young man in Glasgow points to an involvement with poems of the Romantic and post-Romantic periods which were concerned both with visionary experience and with the need to transcend human suffering. He tells us: I was enchanted by The Solitary Reaper, the Ode to a Nightingale, the Ode to the West Wind, The Lotus Eaters, and the chorus from Atalanta in Calydon'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Unknown

  

Wiliam Wordsworth : 'The Solitary Reaper'

'[Muir's] account of his reading material as a young man in Glasgow points to an involvement with poems of the Romantic and post-Romantic periods which were concerned both with visionary experience and with the need to transcend human suffering. He tells us: I was enchanted by The Solitary Reaper, the Ode to a Nightingale, the Ode to the West Wind, The Lotus Eaters, and the chorus from Atalanta in Calydon'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Unknown

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Henry Mayhew holds meeting with a group of the lowest class of male juvenile thieves and vagabonds; during the meeting they tell him what they have read/ read regularly and Mayhew records this: "Respecting their education, according to the popular meaning of the term, 63 of the 150 were able to read and write, and they were principally thieves. Fifty of this number said they had read 'Jack Sheppard' and the lines of Dick Turpin, Claude du Val, and all the other popular thieves' novels, as well as the Newgate Calendar and Lives of Robbers and Pirates. Those who could not read themselves, said they'd had 'Jack Sheppard' read to them at the lodging houses. Numbers avowed that they had been induced to resort to an abandoned course of life from reading the lives of notorious thieves and novels about highway robbers."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, either in penny numbers or as volume

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Rookwood

Henry Mayhew holds meeting with a group of the lowest class of male juvenile thieves and vagabonds; during the meeting they tell him what they have read/ read regularly and Mayhew records this: "Respecting their education, according to the popular meaning of the term, 63 of the 150 were able to read and write, and they were principally thieves. Fifty of this number said they had read 'Jack Sheppard' and the lines of Dick Turpin, Claude du Val, and all the other popular thieves' novels, as well as the Newgate Calendar and Lives of Robbers and Pirates. Those who could not read themselves, said they'd had 'Jack Sheppard' read to them at the lodging houses. Numbers avowed that they had been induced to resort to an abandoned course of life from reading the lives of notorious thieves and novels about highway robbers."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, either in penny numbers or as volume

  

C. Maurice Bowra : The Heritage of Symbolism

'[Muir] wrote to Stephen Spender in the summer of 1944 that Bowra's book had made him realise that he had been writing symbolist poetry himself for years without realising it. He added: "He inspired me to write one deliberately, which I enclose".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

 : Claude du Val

Henry Mayhew holds meeting with a group of the lowest class of male juvenile thieves and vagabonds; during the meeting they tell him what they have read/ read regularly and Mayhew records this: "Respecting their education, according to the popular meaning of the term, 63 of the 150 were able to read and write, and they were principally thieves. Fifty of this number said they had read 'Jack Sheppard' and the lines of Dick Turpin, Claude du Val, and all the other popular thieves' novels, as well as the Newgate Calendar and Lives of Robbers and Pirates. Those who could not read themselves, said they'd had 'Jack Sheppard' read to them at the lodging houses. Numbers avowed that they had been induced to resort to an abandoned course of life from reading the lives of notorious thieves and novels about highway robbers."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, either in penny numbers or as volume

  

 : Newgate Calendar

Henry Mayhew holds meeting with a group of the lowest class of male juvenile thieves and vagabonds; during the meeting they tell him what they have read/ read regularly and Mayhew records this: "Respecting their education, according to the popular meaning of the term, 63 of the 150 were able to read and write, and they were principally thieves. Fifty of this number said they had read 'Jack Sheppard' and the lines of Dick Turpin, Claude du Val, and all the other popular thieves' novels, as well as the Newgate Calendar and Lives of Robbers and Pirates. Those who could not read themselves, said they'd had 'Jack Sheppard' read to them at the lodging houses. Numbers avowed that they had been induced to resort to an abandoned course of life from reading the lives of notorious thieves and novels about highway robbers."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Lives of the Robbers and Pirates

Henry Mayhew holds meeting with a group of the lowest class of male juvenile thieves and vagabonds; during the meeting they tell him what they have read/ read regularly and Mayhew records this: "Respecting their education, according to the popular meaning of the term, 63 of the 150 were able to read and write, and they were principally thieves. Fifty of this number said they had read 'Jack Sheppard' and the lines of Dick Turpin, Claude du Val, and all the other popular thieves' novels, as well as the Newgate Calendar and Lives of Robbers and Pirates. Those who could not read themselves, said they'd had 'Jack Sheppard' read to them at the lodging houses. Numbers avowed that they had been induced to resort to an abandoned course of life from reading the lives of notorious thieves and novels about highway robbers."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Henry Mayhew holds meeting with a group of the lowest class of male juvenile thieves and vagabonds; during the meeting they tell him what they have read/ read regularly and Mayhew records this: "Respecting their education, according to the popular meaning of the term, 63 of the 150 were able to read and write, and they were principally thieves. Fifty of this number said they had read 'Jack Sheppard' and the lines of Dick Turpin, Claude du Val, and all the other popular thieves' novels, as well as the Newgate Calendar and Lives of Robbers and Pirates. Those who could not read themselves, said they'd had 'Jack Sheppard' read to them at the lodging houses. Numbers avowed that they had been induced to resort to an abandoned course of life from reading the lives of notorious thieves and novels about highway robbers."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: group of London thieves     Print: Book, Serial / periodical, either as penny numbers or in volume

  

The Bible  : 

'[Muir] recalls... that his father conducted a little service in the farmhouse each week: "Every Sunday night he gathered us together to read a chapter of the Bible and kneel down in prayer. These Sunday nights are among my happiest memories; there was a feeling of complete security and union among us as we sat reading about David and Elijah".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : [Essays]

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Catullus : Carmina

'Three of W[ordsworth]'s translations of Catullus survive from between 1786 and c.1788 ["Death of a Starling" (1786); "Lesbia" (1786); "Septimius and Acme" (1788)] ... he had studied Catullus closely as a schoolboy ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

John Ruskin : Sesame and Lilies

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : Autocrat of the Breakfast Table

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : Essays of Elia

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

John Donne : Holy Sonnet 10

'W[ordsworth] copied a brief quotation from Donne's "Death be not proud" into D[ove] C[ottage] MS 16 ["Death be not proud, though some have called thee / Mighty and dreadful ... "]'.

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

James Boswell : Life of Johnson

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

John Gibson Lockhart : The Life of Scott

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : The Life of John Sterling

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Emily Bronte : Wuthering Heights

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Miguel de Cervantes : Don Quixote

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Daniel Defoe : Robinson Crusoe

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

John Bunyan : The Pilgrim's Progress

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Thomas a Kempis : The Imitation of Christ

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Sonnets

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Alfred Lord Tennyson : 

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Horace : Works of Horace. Translated into English Prose, for the use of those who are desirous of acquiring or recovering a competent knowledge of the Latin language. By Christopher Smart

'In spring 1789 W[ordsworth]translated Horace's Ode to Apollo (Ode I xxxi) with the help of [Christopher] Smart's translation.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Robert Browning : 

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Francis Turner Palgrave : Golden Treasury (ed.)

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Horace : Odes

'W[ordsworth]'s translation of Horace's Ode to the Bandusian Fountain (Ode III xiii) appears in a manuscript dating from his time at Windy Brow in 1794.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Richard Payne Knight : Progress of Civil Society, A Didactic Poem, The

'A 28-line transcription in Wordsworth's hand appears in the Alfoxden Notebook (Dove Cottage MS 14) of a quotation from Richard Payne Knight's The Progress of Civil Society.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

David Herd : Ancient and Modern Scottish Poems

'Mary Moorman, "Wordsworth's Commonplace Book," Notes & Queries NS 4 (1957) 400-5, reports that the commonplace book used by Wordsworth after 1800 contains "four verses from a ballad ['The Cruel Mother'] in Herd's Ancient and Modern Scottish Poems (1776) ... "'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Robert Heron : Observations Made in a Journey through the Western Countries of Scotland

'[Heron] provided one of the first entries in [Wordsworth's] Commonplace Book ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Bronte : Villette

'[Philip Inman] loved everything by Charlotte Bronte, partly for what she had to say about the class system: "Characters like Jane Eyre and Lucy Snowe were humble individuals in the eyes of the world, with only their dogged determination and lack of 'frills' as weapons against the dash and arrogance of those haughty and wealthy rivals among whom their lot was cast". Yet he admired Jane Austen for an equal but opposite reason: "The world of which she wrote, in which elegant gentlemen of fortune courted gentle, punctilliously correct ladies in refined drawing rooms, was a remote fairy-tale country to me. Some day, I thought, perhaps I would get to know a world in which voices were always soft and modulated and in which lively and witty conversation was more important than 'brass'."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Bronte : Jane Eyre

'[Philip Inman] loved everything by Charlotte Bronte, partly for what she had to say about the class system: "Characters like Jane Eyre and Lucy Snowe were humble individuals in the eyes of the world, with only their dogged determination and lack of 'frills' as weapons against the dash and arrogance of those haughty and wealthy rivals among whom their lot was cast". Yet he admired Jane Austen for an equal but opposite reason: "The world of which she wrote, in which elegant gentlemen of fortune courted gentle, punctilliously correct ladies in refined drawing rooms, was a remote fairy-tale country to me. Some day, I thought, perhaps I would get to know a world in which voices were always soft and modulated and in which lively and witty conversation was more important than 'brass'."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Jane Austen : [novels]

'[Philip Inman] loved everything by Charlotte Bronte, partly for what she had to say about the class system: "Characters like Jane Eyre and Lucy Snowe were humble individuals in the eyes of the world, with only their dogged determination and lack of 'frills' as weapons against the dash and arrogance of those haughty and wealthy rivals among whom their lot was cast". Yet he admired Jane Austen for an equal but opposite reason: "The world of which she wrote, in which elegant gentlemen of fortune courted gentle, punctilliously correct ladies in refined drawing rooms, was a remote fairy-tale country to me. Some day, I thought, perhaps I would get to know a world in which voices were always soft and modulated and in which lively and witty conversation was more important than 'brass'."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Thomas Holcroft : Man of Ten Thousand, The

'W[ordsworth] read Holcroft's play shortly after publication ... on 21 March 1796 [he] told [William] Mathews that "I have attempted to read Holcroft's Man of Ten Thousand, but such stuff! Demme hey, humph."'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : Ivanhoe

'When asked how books had shaped him, Labour M.P. F.W. Jowett ranged widely: Ivanhoe made him want to read, Unto this Last made him a socialist, Past and Present made him think, Vanity Fair and Les Miserables taught him human sympathy, and Wuthering Heights taught him respect for man and nature.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

Juvenal : Satire X

Wordsworth to Robert Shelton Mackenzie, 26 January 1838: 'When I was a very young Man the present Archdeacon Wrangham and I amused ourselves in imitating jointly Juvenal's Satire upon Nobility - or rather parts of it. How far the choice of a Subject might be influenced by the run at that time against Aristocracy, I am unable to say ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

John Ruskin : Unto this Last

'When asked how books had shaped him, Labour M.P. F.W. Jowett ranged widely: Ivanhoe made him want to read, Unto this Last made him a socialist, Past and Present made him think, Vanity Fair and Les Miserables taught him human sympathy, and Wuthering Heights taught him respect for man and nature.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

Juvenal : Satire X

William Wordsworth to Robert Shelton Mackenzie, 26 January 1838: 'When I was a very young Man the present Archdeacon Wrangham and I amused ourselves in imitating jointly Juvenal's Satire upon Nobility - or rather parts of it. How far the choice of a Subject might be influenced by the run at that time against Aristocracy, I am unable to say ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Wrangham      

  

Thomas Carlyle : Past and Present

'When asked how books had shaped him, Labour M.P. F.W. Jowett ranged widely: Ivanhoe made him want to read, Unto this Last made him a socialist, Past and Present made him think, Vanity Fair and Les Miserables taught him human sympathy, and Wuthering Heights taught him respect for man and nature.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

William Makepeace Thackeray : Vanity Fair

'When asked how books had shaped him, Labour M.P. F.W. Jowett ranged widely: Ivanhoe made him want to read, Unto this Last made him a socialist, Past and Present made him think, Vanity Fair and Les Miserables taught him human sympathy, and Wuthering Heights taught him respect for man and nature.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

Victor Hugo : Les Miserables

'When asked how books had shaped him, Labour M.P. F.W. Jowett ranged widely: Ivanhoe made him want to read, Unto this Last made him a socialist, Past and Present made him think, Vanity Fair and Les Miserables taught him human sympathy, and Wuthering Heights taught him respect for man and nature.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

Emily Bronte : Wuthering Heights

'When asked how books had shaped him, Labour M.P. F.W. Jowett ranged widely: Ivanhoe made him want to read, Unto this Last made him a socialist, Past and Present made him think, Vanity Fair and Les Miserables taught him human sympathy, and Wuthering Heights taught him respect for man and nature.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: F.W. Jowett      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Edward II

'At the front of D[ove] C[ottage] MS 16, in use during 1798, D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied Marlowe's Edward II V.v.55-108, with some omissions ... The extract was copied from Dodsley's Select Collection of Old Plays.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : Select Collection of Old Plays

'At the front of D[ove] C[ottage] MS 16, in use during 1798, D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied Marlowe's Edward II V.v.55-108, with some omissions ... The extract was copied from Dodsley's Select Collection of Old Plays.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : Picture, The

' ... a short extract from [Philip] Massinger's The Picture (III.v.211-19) [was] copied by D[orothy] W[ordsworth] into D[ove] C[ottage] MS 16 ... '

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : Queen Mab

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lambb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Unknown

  

Moschus : Lament for Bion

'During the spring or summer of 1789, W[ordsworth] translated Moschus' Lament for Bion [Idyllium III] ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Francis Bacon : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Bion : Death of Adonis

'W[ordsworth] read (in [John] Langhorne's translation) Bion's death of Adonis by 1786 ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

William Shakespeare : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Petrarch : Se la mia vita da l'aspro tormento (sonnet)

'W[ordsworth] composed a loose translation of Petrarch, Se la mia vita da l'aspro tormento in 1789-90 while learning Italian with Agostino Isola.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Jean Racine : Athalie

'On the facing verso of the MS [of Letter to the Bishop of Llandaff], [Wordsworth] ... copies out Athalie I.ii.278-82, 292-94 ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : 

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Laurence Sterne : Tristram Shandy

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Thomas More : Utopia

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : Athalie

Thomas Moore on encountering W[ordsworth] in Paris on 24 Oct. 1820: 'A young Frenchman called in, and it was amusing to hear him and Wordsworth at cross purposes on the subject of "Athalie"; Wordsworth saying that he did not wish to see it acted, as it would never come up to the high imagination he had formed in reading it ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Herbert George Wells : The World Set Free

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

 : [biography of William Penn]

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : 

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

George Sandys : Relation of a Journey Begun 1610. Foure Bookes. Containing a Description of the Turkish Empire, of AEgypt, of the Holy Land, of the Remote Parts of Italy and Ilands Adjoyning

'[Thomas] Bowman [Wordsworth's schoolmaster] recalled that W[ordsworth] read [George Sandys, Relation of a Journey Begun 1610] in the Hawkshead Grammar School Library.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'[Emrys Hughes] read the social history of Macaulay, Froude, and J.R. Green; Thorold Rogers's Six Centuries of Work and Wages particularly appealed to him because it offered "not the history of kings and queens, but of the way ordinary people ha struggled to live throughout the centuries..." Hughes was one of those agitators who found a virtual Marxism in Thomas Carlyle. The French Revolution inspired the hope that a popular revolt somewhere would end the war...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

George Shelvocke : Voyage Round the World by the Way of the Great South Sea, Performed in the Years 1719-1722

'As W[ordsworth] recalled in the Fenwick Note to We are Seven ... his reading of Shelvocke's Voyages inspired the killing of the albatross in C[oleridge]'s Ancient Mariner. W[ordsworth] dates this reading "a day or two before" the walking tour to Lynton - which would make it c.11-12 November 1797.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

James Anthony Froude : 

'[Emrys Hughes] read the social history of Macaulay, Froude, and J.R. Green; Thorold Rogers's Six Centuries of Work and Wages particularly appealed to him because it offered "not the history of kings and queens, but of the way ordinary people ha struggled to live throughout the centuries..." Hughes was one of those agitators who found a virtual Marxism in Thomas Carlyle. The French Revolution inspired the hope that a popular revolt somewhere would end the war...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

John Richard Green : 

'[Emrys Hughes] read the social history of Macaulay, Froude, and J.R. Green; Thorold Rogers's Six Centuries of Work and Wages particularly appealed to him because it offered "not the history of kings and queens, but of the way ordinary people ha struggled to live throughout the centuries..." Hughes was one of those agitators who found a virtual Marxism in Thomas Carlyle. The French Revolution inspired the hope that a popular revolt somewhere would end the war...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Thorold Rogers : Six Centuries of Work and Wages

'[Emrys Hughes] read the social history of Macaulay, Froude, and J.R. Green; Thorold Rogers's Six Centuries of Work and Wages particularly appealed to him because it offered "not the history of kings and queens, but of the way ordinary people ha struggled to live throughout the centuries..." Hughes was one of those agitators who found a virtual Marxism in Thomas Carlyle. The French Revolution inspired the hope that a popular revolt somewhere would end the war...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : The French Revolution

'[Emrys Hughes] read the social history of Macaulay, Froude, and J.R. Green; Thorold Rogers's Six Centuries of Work and Wages particularly appealed to him because it offered "not the history of kings and queens, but of the way ordinary people ha struggled to live throughout the centuries..." Hughes was one of those agitators who found a virtual Marxism in Thomas Carlyle. The French Revolution inspired the hope that a popular revolt somewhere would end the war...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : [sonnets (two)]

'On the rear flyleaf of his copy of [Charlotte Smith's] Elegiac Sonnets [5th edn, 1789]... W[ordsworth] copied two more of Smith's compositions, both of which were first published in her novel, Celestina (1791), and reprinted as XLIX and LI in Elegiac Sonnets (6th edn, 1792) ... W[ordsworth]'s copies vary from both texts as published.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

 : Spectator, The

'In later years, W[ordsworth] recalled that under Agostino Isola "I translated the Vision of Mirza, and two or three other papers of the Spectator, into Italian" [Prose Works 3:373].'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Virgil : Aeneid

'On the inside cover of D[ove] C[ottage] MS 2, in use during 1786-7, a faint pencil inscription survives from c.1786: "Non hoc ista sibi tempus spectacula," from Virgil, Aeneid vi 37. In The Death of the Starling several pages later, we find the epigraph, "Sunt lacrimae rerum" ... from Aeneid i.462.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Virgil : Georgics

' ... as a student at Cambridge, W[ordsworth] made a number of translations from Virgil's Georgics .. surviving manuscripts indicate that the translations were made in summer 1788 and spring 1789.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Christoph Martin Wieland : Oberon

'"I am translating the Oberon of Wieland," C[oleridge] told [Thomas] Poole, 20 Nov 1797.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Francis Wrangham : Brutoniad

'[Francis] Wrangham was ... in the habit of reading MS verses to his friends: C[oleridge] heard his "Brutoniad" in Sept. 1794.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Wrangham      Manuscript: Unknown

  

unknown : Edda Soemundar hinns Froda

Robert Southey to William Taylor, April 1799: '[Amos Cottle] was in a hurry, and wanted northern learning, but seemed to have no idea of knowing how or where to look for it. The "Edda" [with facing Icelandic and Latin texts] fell into his hands and delighted him. His brother [Joseph], who knows no language but English, wanted to read it, and he had begun a prose translation, when I advised him to versify it ... '

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Amos Cottle      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Amos Cottle : Italia, vastata

'Coleridge's interest in [Amos] Cottle dated back at least to May 1797, when he read his Latin poem, Italia, vastata ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

William Wordsworth : Fidelity

Transcription of William Wordsworh, "Fidelity" in letter from Dorothy Wordsworth to Lady Beaumont, 2 March 1806 (first four stanzas as in 1807 edition, followed by further eight varying from these).

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Michaelangelo Buonarotti : [sonnet]

Version of Wordsworth's translation of Michaelangelo sonnet transcribed in letter to Sir George Beaumont, 8 Sept 1806.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

William Wordsworth : Star-Gazers

Transcription of William Wordsworth, "Star-Gazers" appears in letter from Dorothy Wordsworth to Lady Beaumont, 15 November 1806.

Unknown
Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

William Wordsworth : The Force of Prayer

Transcription of William Wordsworth, 'The Force of Prayer' appears in letter from Dorothy Wordsworth to Jane Marshall, 18 October 1807.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

unknown : [advertisement]

Dorothy Wordsworth to Jane Marshall, 11 May 1808: 'Would you believe it we too had dreams about Loch Kettrine when we saw the advertisement ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Advertisement

  

anon [working people] : ["half-penny Ballads"]

William Wordsworth discusses reading habits of the local labouring classes in letter to Francis Wrangham, 5 June 1808: '... I find, among the people I am speaking of, half-penny Ballads, and penny and two-penny histories, in great abundance; these are often bought as charitable tributes to the poor Persons who hawk them about (and it is the best way of procuring them); they are frequently stitched together in tolerably thick volumes, and such I have read; some of the contents, though not often religious, very good; others objectionable, either for the superstition in them (such as prophecies, fortune-telling, etc.) or more frequently for indelicacy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : ["penny and two-penny histories"]

William Wordsworth discusses reading habits of the local labouring classes in letter to Francis Wrangham, 5 June 1808: ' ... I find, among the people I am speaking of, half-penny Ballads, and penny and two-penny histories, in great abundance; these are often bought as charitable tributes to the poor Persons who hawk them about (and it is the best way of procuring them); they are frequently stitched together in tolerably thick volumes, and such I have read; some of the contents, though not often religious, very good; others objectionable, either for the superstition in them (such as prophecies, fortune-telling, etc.) or more frequently for indelicacy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

unknown : [magazine]

William Wordsworth to S.T. Coleridge, [5 May 1809]: 'Turning over an old Magazine three or four days ago I hit upon a paragraph stating that B. Flower had been fined ?100, and commited to Newgate for 4 months, for reflecting on the Union of Ireland, in some comments upon a speech of the bishop of Llandaff.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Wordsworth : Convention of Cintra, The

William Wordsworth to Daniel Stuart, 'Sunday Night, June 4th [1809]': 'Nothing but vexation seems to attend me in this affair of the Pamphlet [The Convention of Cintra]. Mr De Quincey according to my request sent me down ten stitched Pamphlets ... and it was not till today that I discovered that in two copies of those stitched the page which was cancelled remains as it first stood, the corrected leaf not having been substituted.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

various : Edinburgh Review

Dorothy Wordsworth to Thomas De Quincey, 1 August 1809: '... I took the pains when I was in Kendal of going to the Book Club to look at the Reviews ... have you seen the Edinburgh Review on Cam[p]bell's Poem [Gertrude of Wyoming]? I know not whether the Extracts brought forward in illustration of the encomiums or the encomiums themselves are more absurd ... The Review of Miss Hannah More's work [Coelebs in Search of a Wife] is equally as foolish, though in a different way ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Thomas Campbell : Gertrude of Wyoming (extracts)

Dorothy Wordsworth to Thomas De Quincey, 1 August 1809: '... I took the pains when I was in Kendal of going to the Book Club to look at the Reviews ... have you seen the Edinburgh Review on Cam[p]bell's Poem [Gertrude of Wyoming]? I know not whther the Extracts brought forward in illustration of the encomiums or the encomiums themselves are more absurd ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Wordsworth : Introduction to Select Views in Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Lancashire, by the Rev. Joseph Wilkinson, Rector of East and West Wretham, in the County of Norfolk and Chaplain to the Marquis of Huntly

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 18 Novembr [1809]: 'Sara [Hutchinson] has been kept almost constantly busy in transcribing ... For William [Wordsworth] she has been transcribing the introduction to a collection of prints to be published by Mr. Wilkinson of Thetford (of which I believe you know the history as your husband's name is down among those of the subscribers). I hope you will be interested with William's part of the work (he has only finished the general introduction, being unable to do the rest until he has seen the prints). It is the only regular and I may say scientific account of the present and past state and appearance of the country that has yet appeared.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Christopher Wordsworth : Ecclesiastical Biography, or Lives of Eminent Men connected with the History of Religion in England

Dorothy Wordsworth to Jane Marshall, [c.19 February 1810] (letter fragmentary): 'Have you seen my Brother Christopher's publication? Lives of eminent men connected with Religion from the Reformation to the Revolution? I am reading it with great inter[est]. The lives of Cardinal Wolsey and Sir Thomas More are delightful.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Samuel Taylor Coleridge : The Friend, A Literary, Moral and Political Weekly Paper

Dorothy Wordsworth to Lady Beaumont, 28 February [1810], on departure of Sara Hutchinson after four years with Wordsworths: 'Coleridge most of all will miss her, as she has transcribed almost every Paper of the Friend for the press.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Manuscript: Unknown

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Jane Marshall, 'Sunday night, 13th April [1810]': 'When I saw the advertisement [for house at Watermillock] in the papers I thought of you: but instantly concluded the house would not do.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Advertisement, NewspaperManuscript: Unknown

  

Geoffrey Chaucer : The Canterbury Tales

Dorothy Wordsworth, on visit to Catherine Clarkson at Bury St Edmunds, to William Wordsworth and Sara Hutchinson, 14 August 1810: 'In the afternoon we looked over half the drawings from Chaucer, and read as much of the prologue ... the next day looked over the rest of the drawings to my great delight, and read the Knight's Tale.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

Dorothy Wordsworth writes to Catherine Clarkson (12 November 1810) with description of three nights' stay during October (c.26-29) 1810 at Hackett (overlooking Langdale and other Lakeland locations) with William and Mary Wordsworth, their four children and a maid: 'The weather was heavenly, when we were there, and the first morning we sate in hot sunshine on a crag, twenty yards from the door, while William read part of the 5th Book of the Paradise Lost to us. He read the Morning Hymn, while a stream of white vapour, which covered the Valley of Brathay, ascended slowly and by degrees melted away. It seemed as if we had never before felt deeply the power of the Poet ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Walter Scott : The Lady of the Lake

Extract of letter from Thomas De Quincey to Mary Wordsworth, given in 30 December 1810 letter from Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson: '"W. Scott's last novel, the Lady of the Lake, is the grand subject of prattle and chatter hereabouts. I have read it aloud to oblige my Mother, and a more disgusting Task I never had. I verily think that it is the completest magazine of all forms of the Falsetto in feeling and diction that now exists ... I have given great offence to some of Walter's idolaters ... in particular, by calling it a novel (which indeed it is; only a very dull one)."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      

  

 : [a romance in the style of Ann Radcliffe]

Extract of letter from S. T. Coleridge to William Wordsworth, given in 30 December 1810 letter from Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson: "'I amused myself a day or two ago on reading a Romance in Mrs Radcliffe's style with making out a scheme which was to serve for all Romances a priori ... '"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson... would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Charles Reade : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson ...would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

George Eliot : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Bronte : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Emily Bronte : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Hardy : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Victor Hugo : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

 : The Bible

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

John Richard Green : 

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Edward Gibbon : [The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire?]

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

John Lothrop Motley : The Rise of the Dutch Republic

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

William Hickling Prescott : The Conquest of Mexico

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

William Hickling Prescott : The Conquest of Peru

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Carlyle : The French Revolution

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

'At Ruskin College he was exposed to Marx, but he found a more compelling Utopian prophet when he read Lewis Carroll to his daughters: "Then one could look at life and affairs from the proper angle, for was not all our work to this end - that little children should live in their Wonderland, and mothers and fathers be heartful of the good of life because they were".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Lewis Carroll : 

'At Ruskin College he was exposed to Marx, but he found a more compelling Utopian prophet when he read Lewis Carroll to his daughters: "Then one could look at life and affairs from the proper angle, for was not all our work to this end - that little children should live in their Wonderland, and mothers and fathers be heartful of the good of life because they were".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

William Morris : 

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Romeo and Juliet

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Bronte : Jane Eyre

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow : Hiawatha

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

John Keats : 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

John Keats : 'The Eve of St Agnes'

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Robert Browning : 'Bishop Blougram's Apology'

'Her first WEA summer scool at the end of the First World War, was "a new and undreamt-of experience... We argued over Wilson's Fourteen Points and in literary sessions read and explored Browning's poems. It was a strange joy to browse overthe niceties of Bishop Blougram's Apology or to delve into the intricacies of The Ring and the Book... It was a month of almost complete happiness; a pinnacle of joy never to be quite reached again".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Robert Browning : 'The Ring and the Book'

'Her first WEA summer school at the end of the First World War, was "a new and undreamt-of experience... We argued over Wilson's Fourteen Points and in literary sessions read and explored Browning's poems. It was a strange joy to browse overthe niceties of Bishop Blougram's Apology or to delve into the intricacies of The Ring and the Book... It was a month of almost complete happiness; a pinnacle of joy never to be quite reached again".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Robert Herrick : 

'[Chaim Lewis] enthusiastically embraced the literature of an alien culture - "the daffodils of Herrick and Wordsworth... the whimsey of Lamb and the stirring rhythmic tales of the Ballads" and, yes, "the wry eloquence of Shylock".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

William Wordsworth : 'Daffodils'

'[Chaim Lewis] enthusiastically embraced the literature of an alien culture - "the daffodils of Herrick and Wordsworth... the whimsey of Lamb and the stirring rhythmic tales of the Ballads" and, yes, "the wry eloquence of Shylock".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : 

'[Chaim Lewis] enthusiastically embraced the literature of an alien culture - "the daffodils of Herrick and Wordsworth... the whimsey of Lamb and the stirring rhythmic tales of the Ballads" and, yes, "the wry eloquence of Shylock".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : The Merchant of Venice

'[Chaim Lewis] enthusiastically embraced the literature of an alien culture - "the daffodils of Herrick and Wordsworth... the whimsey of Lamb and the stirring rhythmic tales of the Ballads" and, yes, "the wry eloquence of Shylock".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Leo Tolstoy : 

'Even before [Chaim Lewis] discovered the English novelists, he was introduced to Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev and Pushkin by a Russian revolutionary rag merchant who studied Dickens in the Whitechapel Public Library and read aloud from Man and Superman. Another friend - the son of a widowed mother, who left school at fourteen - exposed him to Egyptology, Greek architecture, Scott, Smollett, the British Musuem and Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Fyodor Dostoevsky : 

'Even before [Chaim Lewis] discovered the English novelists, he was introduced to Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev and Pushkin by a Russian revolutionary rag merchant who studied Dickens in the Whitechapel Public Library and read aloud from Man and Superman. Another friend - the son of a widowed mother, who left school at fourteen - exposed him to Egyptology, Greek architecture, Scott, Smollett, the British Musuem and Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Ivan Turgenev : 

'Even before [Chaim Lewis] discovered the English novelists, he was introduced to Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev and Pushkin by a Russian revolutionary rag merchant who studied Dickens in the Whitechapel Public Library and read aloud from Man and Superman. Another friend - the son of a widowed mother, who left school at fourteen - exposed him to Egyptology, Greek architecture, Scott, Smollett, the British Musuem and Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Alexander Pushkin : 

'Even before [Chaim Lewis] discovered the English novelists, he was introduced to Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev and Pushkin by a Russian revolutionary rag merchant who studied Dickens in the Whitechapel Public Library and read aloud from Man and Superman. Another friend - the son of a widowed mother, who left school at fourteen - exposed him to Egyptology, Greek architecture, Scott, Smollett, the British Musuem and Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

George Bernard Shaw : Man and Superman

'Even before [Chaim Lewis] discovered the English novelists, he was introduced to Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev and Pushkin by a Russian revolutionary rag merchant who studied Dickens in the Whitechapel Public Library and read aloud from Man and Superman. Another friend - the son of a widowed mother, who left school at fourteen - exposed him to Egyptology, Greek architecture, Scott, Smollett, the British Musuem and Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Charles Dickens : 

'Even before [Chaim Lewis] discovered the English novelists, he was introduced to Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev and Pushkin by a Russian revolutionary rag merchant who studied Dickens in the Whitechapel Public Library and read aloud from Man and Superman. Another friend - the son of a widowed mother, who left school at fourteen - exposed him to Egyptology, Greek architecture, Scott, Smollett, the British Musuem and Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: a revolutionary Russian rag merchant      Print: Book

  

Charles Dickens : 

'In a Sunday school library set up by a cotton mill fire-beater, [Thomas Thompson] read Dickens, Thackeray, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Marcus Aurelius'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Thompson      Print: Book

  

William Makepeace Thackeray : 

'In a Sunday school library set up by a cotton mill fire-beater, [Thomas Thompson] read Dickens, Thackeray, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Marcus Aurelius'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Thompson      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : 

'In a Sunday school library set up by a cotton mill fire-beater, [Thomas Thompson] read Dickens, Thackeray, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Marcus Aurelius'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Thompson      Print: Book

  

Marcus Aurelius : [Meditations]?

'In a Sunday school library set up by a cotton mill fire-beater, [Thomas Thompson] read Dickens, Thackeray, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Marcus Aurelius'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Thompson      Print: Book

  

William Paley : 

'[William Lovett] read William Paley and other theologians in [the library of "The Liberals"].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Lovett      Print: Book

  

 : Evening Mail

'With little formal education, William Farish acquired basic literacy and political knowledge by reading newspapers to Newtown weavers. (Their favourite was the tri-weekly Evening Mail, a condensation of The Times).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Farish      Print: Newspaper

  

Samuel Smiles : Self Help

'Blatchford, once he read it carefully found [Samuel Smiles's Self Help] "one of the most delightful and invigorating books it has been my happy fortune to meet with".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Peel Glanville Blatchford      Print: Book

  

Samuel Smiles : Self Help

'George Gregory offers a case study in the importance of Self-Help. His father was an illiterate Somsert miner, his mother a servant who read nothing but the Bible... Gregory only had a few school prizes - Jack and the Ostrich, a children's story; The Crucifixion of Philip Strong, a gripping tale of labor unrest; and the verses of Cornish poet, John Harries - and the family read a weekly serial, Strongdold the Gladiator. Having left school at twelve to work in the mines, Gregory had no access to serious reading matter until mid-adolescence, when a clerk introduced him to Self-Help. That book, he recalled in old age, "has lived with me, and in me, for more than sixty years... I was impressed by its quality for I had never touched a book of such high quality; and the impression deepened and became vivid as I took it home, read the stories of men who had helped themselves, struggled against enormous difficulties, suffered privations...but went on to rise phoenix-like from the ruins of their plans... I realised that my lack of education was not decisive of what I might become, so I commenced to reach out into the future".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

John Harries : 

'George Gregory offers a case study in the importance of Self-Help. His father was an illiterate Somsert miner, his mother a servant who read nothing but the Bible... Gregory only had a few school prizes - Jack and the Ostrich, a children's story; The Crucifixion of Philip Strong, a gripping tale of labor unrest; and the verses of Cornish poet, John Harries - and the family read a weekly serial, Strongdold the Gladiator. Having left school at twelve to work in the mines, Gregory had no access to serious reading matter until mid-adolescence, when a clerk introduced him to Self-Help. That book, he recalled in old age, "has lived with me, and in me, for more than sixty years... I was impressed by its quality for I had never touched a book of such high quality; and the impression deepened and became vivid as I took it home, read the stories of men who had helped themselves, struggled against enormous difficulties, suffered privations...but went on to rise phoenix-like from the ruins of their plans... I realised that my lack of education was not decisive of what I might become, so I commenced to reach out into the future".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

 : Jack and The Ostrich

'George Gregory offers a case study in the importance of Self-Help. His father was an illiterate Somerset miner, his mother a servant who read nothing but the Bible... Gregory only had a few school prizes - Jack and the Ostrich, a children's story; The Crucifixion of Philip Strong, a gripping tale of labor unrest; and the verses of Cornish poet, John Harries - and the family read a weekly serial, Strongdold the Gladiator. Having left school at twelve to work in the mines, Gregory had no access to serious reading matter until mid-adolescence, when a clerk introduced him to Self-Help. That book, he recalled in old age, "has lived with me, and in me, for more than sixty years... I was impressed by its quality for I had never touched a book of such high quality; and the impression deepened and became vivid as I took it home, read the stories of men who had helped themselves, struggled against enormous difficulties, suffered privations...but went on to rise phoenix-like from the ruins of their plans... I realised that my lack of education was not decisive of what I might become, so I commenced to reach out into the future".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

Charles Monroe Sheldon : The Crucifixion of Philip Strong

'George Gregory offers a case study in the importance of Self-Help. His father was an illiterate Somerset miner, his mother a servant who read nothing but the Bible... Gregory only had a few school prizes - Jack and the Ostrich, a children's story; The Crucifixion of Philip Strong, a gripping tale of labor unrest; and the verses of Cornish poet, John Harries - and the family read a weekly serial, Strongdold the Gladiator. Having left school at twelve to work in the mines, Gregory had no access to serious reading matter until mid-adolescence, when a clerk introduced him to Self-Help. That book, he recalled in old age, "has lived with me, and in me, for more than sixty years... I was impressed by its quality for I had never touched a book of such high quality; and the impression deepened and became vivid as I took it home, read the stories of men who had helped themselves, struggled against enormous difficulties, suffered privations...but went on to rise phoenix-like from the ruins of their plans... I realised that my lack of education was not decisive of what I might become, so I commenced to reach out into the future".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

 : Strongdold the Gladiator

'George Gregory offers a case study in the importance of Self-Help. His father was an illiterate Somerset miner, his mother a servant who read nothing but the Bible... Gregory only had a few school prizes - Jack and the Ostrich, a children's story; The Crucifixion of Philip Strong, a gripping tale of labor unrest; and the verses of Cornish poet, John Harries - and the family read a weekly serial, Strongdold the Gladiator. Having left school at twelve to work in the mines, Gregory had no access to serious reading matter until mid-adolescence, when a clerk introduced him to Self-Help. That book, he recalled in old age, "has lived with me, and in me, for more than sixty years... I was impressed by its quality for I had never touched a book of such high quality; and the impression deepened and became vivid as I took it home, read the stories of men who had helped themselves, struggled against enormous difficulties, suffered privations...but went on to rise phoenix-like from the ruins of their plans... I realised that my lack of education was not decisive of what I might become, so I commenced to reach out into the future".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Captain Charles Pasley : An Essay on the Military Policy and Institutions of the British Empire

William Wordsworth to Captain Charles Pasley, 28 March 1811: 'Now for your book. I had expected it with great impatience, and desired a Friend to send it down to me immediately on its appearance, which he neglected to do. On this account, I did not see it till a few days ago. I have read it through twice, with great care, and many parts three or four times over.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Philip Beaver : African Memoranda: relative to an attempt to establish a British Settlement on the Western Coast of Africa in the Year 1792

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 12 May 1811: 'We have had no leisure for reading. I have not opened a Book except on a Sunday, and when the rest of the family were in bed ... the only book which I have read through has been Beaver's account of the disastrous Expedition to Bulama. I suppose you have read his book as it concerns Africa and the Slave Trade.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The Life of John Buncle

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 14 August 1811: 'I have read nothing since I wrote to you except bits here and there and the Novel of John Bunkle - but I am going to set to and read - though I have still some sewing to do amongst mending the Bairns' cloaths.'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : ['a little poem upon the comet']

William Wordsworth to Lady Beaumont, 20 November 1811: 'Do you see the Courier newspaper at Dunmow? I ask on account of a little poem upon the comet, which I have read in it to-day. Though with several defects ... it has great merit, and is far superior to the run not merely of newspaper but of modern poetry in general. I half suspect it to be Coleridge's ... I know of no other writer of the day who can write so well. It consists of five stanzas, in the measure of the Fairy Queen. It is to be found in last Saturday's paper, November 16th. If you don't see the Courier, we will transcribe it for you.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Courier, The

William Wordsworth to Lady Beaumont, 20 November 1811: 'Do you see the Courier newspaper at Dunmow? I ask on account of a little poem upon the comet, which I have read in it to-day. Though with several defects ... it has great merit, and is far superior to the run not merely of newspaper but of modern poetry in general. I half suspect it to be Coleridge's ... I know of no other writer of the day who can so so well. It consists of five stanzas, in the measure of the Fairy Queen. It is to be found in last Saturday's paper, November 16th. If you don't see the Courier, we will transcribe it for you.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 27 December 1811: 'To diminish the evil [of smoking chimneys] we have a constant fire in Sara's room where we are now sitting at 7 o' clock in the evening. John is reading his lesson to Sara.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      

  

Daniel Defoe : Robinson Crusoe

Dorothy Wordsworth to William Wordsworth, 23 April 1812: 'John is certainly much quicker in reading than he was. He has read very hard and taken up the Book frequently himself - this with the hope of getting into his new history of England when he has finished Robinson Crusoe.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Amelia Opie : Adeline Mowbray or Mother and Daughter

Dorothy Wordsworth to William Wordsworth, 23 April 1812: 'We have not yet been sufficiently settled to read any thing but Novels. Adeline Mowbray made us quite sick before we got to the end of it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Book

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to William Wordsworth, 23 April 1812: 'Our new Master reads prayers to the Boys every night - John says he does not read so well as Mr Johnson; but about like Mr Sewel, which Mr Sewel Sara reports to be the worst Reader in the world.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group:      

  

 : [travel books]

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham, ['Early Spring 1812']: 'I see no new books except by the merest accident ... The only modern Books that I read are those of travels, or such as relate to Matters of fact; and the only modern books that I care for ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to William and Mary Wordsworth, 3 May [1812]: 'The Coleridges and Algernon [Montagu] were here yesterday and John and A had a happy day of play and reading; for Algernon is very good in reading to John.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Algernon Montagu      

  

 : [a story book]

Dorothy Wordsworth to William and Mary Wordsworth, 3 May [1812]: '[John] is reading a Story Book of Algernon [Montagu]'s at home and you would be surprised to hear how well he reads it; yet when he is reading a Book that does not interest him he seems to read it just as ill as ever.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      Print: BookManuscript: Letter

  

unknown : History of England

Dorothy Wordsworth to William and Mary Wordsworth, 3 May [1812]: '[John] appears to us very slow in comprehending what he reads in the Grammar. Today we proposed to him to take his History of England to School; but he blushed and said he could not read well enough - I tried him and find he can ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      Print: BookManuscript: Letter

  

 : [grammar]

Dorothy Wordsworth to William and Mary Wordsworth, 3 May [1812]: '[John] appears to us very slow in comprehending what he reads in the Grammar. Today we proposed to him to take his History of England to School; but he blushed and said he could not read well enough - I tried him and find he can ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Robert Southey : Chronicle of the Cid, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to William and Mary Wordsworth, 3 May [1812]: 'I am reading the Cid.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : [nursery rhymes]

Dorothy Wordsworth to Mary Hutchinson, 1 February 1813: 'Willy [Wordsworth, the poet's son] is now beside me ... He has taken up a book, and there he reads fragments of a hundred little songs - about Cock Robin, pussy cat and all sorts of things. he is very entertaining; but one half of the heart is sad while the other laughs at his strange fancies.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Willy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Miguel Cervantes : Don Quixote

Transcribed from title page to edition of Don Quixote in 30 May 1813 letter from William Wordsworth to Basil Montagu: 'The History of the Valorous and Witty Knight Errant / Don Quixote of the Mancha / Written in Spanish by Michael Cervantes / Translated in to English / By Thomas Shelton / And now printed Verbatim from the 4to / Edit: of 1620 / With a curious set of new Cuts, from / the French of Coypel / London, printed for D. Midwinter &c. / M.DCCXL.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson [about 14 Sept. 1813]: 'We have had no time to read Newspapers [with decoration of Rydal Mount] but have been obliged to content ourselves with William's report even of the late most important battles in Germany and all other proceedings. Murders we do read and were horror struck with that of Mr and Mrs Brown and the confession of the murderer ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: NewspaperManuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Clarkson : Memoirs of the Private and Public Life of William Penn

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 4 October [1813]: 'I was resolved not to write until I had read your Husband's Book, of which literally I have not even now read ten pages, from want of time to read anything.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: BookManuscript: Letter

  

Anne Grant : Memoirs of an American Lady

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 4 October [1813]: 'My whole summer's reading has been a part of two volumes of Mrs Grant's American Lady, which Southey lent to be speedily returned, and a dip or two in Southey's Nelson - with snatches at the Newspaper and Sunday's readings with the Bairns.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Robert Southey : Life of Nelson

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 4 October [1813]: 'My whole summer's reading has been a part of two volumes of Mrs Grant's American Lady, which Southey lent to be speedily returned, and a dip or two in Southey's Nelson - with snatches at the Newspaper and Sunday's readings with the Bairns.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 4 October [1813]: 'My whole summer's reading has been a part of two volumes of Mrs Grant's American Lady, which Southey lent to be speedily returned, and a dip or two in Southey's Nelson - with snatches at the Newspaper and Sunday's readings with the Bairns.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : ['readings with the Bairns']

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 4 October [1813]: 'My whole summer's reading has been a part of two volumes of Mrs Grant's American Lady, which Southey lent to be speedily returned, and a dip or two in Southey's Nelson - with snatches at the Newspaper and Sunday's readings with the Bairns.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

Samuel Rogers : Poems

William Wordsworth to Samuel Rogers, 5 May 1814: 'I have to thank you for a Present of your Volume of Poems, received some time since, through the hands of Southey. I have read it with great pleasure.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Hazlitt : Review of The Excursion

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 11 November 1814: 'I saw two sections of Hazlitt's Review [of William Wordsworth, The Excursion, in the Examiner] at Rydale, and did not think them nearly so well written as I should have expected from him ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Examiner, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 11 November 1814: 'I saw two sections of Hazlitt's Review [of William Wordsworth, The Excursion, in the Examiner] at Rydale, and did not think them nearly so well written as I should have expected from him ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Wordsworth : Yarrow Visted

Writing to Catherine Clarkson, 11 November 1814, Dorothy Wordsworth gives transcription of version of William Wordsworth, "Yarrow Visited".

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

William Wordsworth : ?Excursion, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 11 November 1814: 'Your anecdote of Tom [?Thomas Clarkson] that he sate up all night reading William's poem gave me as much pleasure as anything I have heard of the effect produced by it ... It speaks highly in favour of Tom's feeling and enthusiasm that he was so wrought upon.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Tom ?Clarkson      Print: Book

  

R. P. Gillies : Egbert, or, The Suicide

William Wordsworth to R. P.Gillies, 23 November 1814: 'I have to thank you ... for Egbert, which is pleasingly and vigorously written, and proves that with a due sacrifice of exertion, you will be capable of performing things that will have a strong claim on the regards of posterity. But keep, I pray you, to the great models; there is in some parts of this tale, particuarly page fourth, too much of a bad writer - Lord Byron ... towards the conclusion, the intervention of the peasant is not only unnecessary, but injurious to the tale ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

R. P. Gillies : Ruminator, The

William Wordsworth to R. P.Gillies, 23 November 1814: 'I have peeped into the Ruminator, and turned to your first letter, which is well executed, and seizes the attention very agreeably. Your longer poem I have barely looked into ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

R. P. Gillies : Childe Alarique, a poet's reverie with other poems

William Wordsworth to R. P.Gillies, 23 November 1814: 'Your longer poem I have barely looked into ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

James Hogg : Queen's Wake, The

William Wordsworth to R. P.Gillies, 23 November 1814: 'I thank you for the Queen's Wake; since I saw you in Edinburgh I have read it. It does Mr. Hogg great credit. Of the tales, I liked best ... the Witch of Fife, the former part of Kilmenie, and the Abbot Mackinnon.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

R. P. Gillies : Exile, The

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 22 December 1814: 'When your Letter arrived I was in the act of reading to Mrs W[ordsworth] your Exile, which pleased me more, I think, than anything that I have read of yours ... I was particularly charmed with the seventeenth stanza, first part ... which I shall often repeat to myself ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

R. P. Gillies : The Ruminator

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 22 December 1814: 'I have read the Ruminator, and I fear that I do not like it quite as much as you would wish. It wants depth and strength, yet it is pleasingly and elegantly written, and contains everywhere the sentiments of a liberal spirit.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

J. H. : Hunting of Badlew, a Dramatic Tale, The

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 22 December 1814: 'Mr. Hogg's Badlew (I suppose it to be his) I could not get through. There are two pretty passages; the flight of the deer, and the falling of the child from the rock of Stirling, though both are a little outre. But the story is coarsely conceived, and in my judgement, as coarsely executed ... the versification harsh and uncouth.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 22 December 1814: 'I have seen a book advertised under your name, which I suppose to be a novel.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Advertisement, Unknown

  

Lucien Bonaparte : Charlemagne, ou L'Eglise Sauvee, poeme epique en 24 chants

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 14 February 1814, 'Have you read Lucien B[onaparte]' s Epic? I attempted it, but gave in at the 6th Canto, being pressed for time. I shall however recommence the Labor if an opportunity offers. But the three first Stanzas convinced me that L.B. was no poet.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth describes Wordsworth family's anxieties at hearing (false)rumour of death of Tom Clarkson, in letter to Sara Hutchinson, 18 February 1815: 'We anxiously examined the newspapers, and their silence [as well as letters] ... strengthened by degrees our hopes with a firm conviction that it was all false.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Newspaper

  

William Wordsworth : Excursion, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 18 February 1815: 'William and Mary and little Willy paid a visit to old Mrs Knott yesterday with the Ex[cursio]n in hand, William intending to read to the old Lady the history of the Grasmere Knight. She could not hear his loud voice; but understood the story very well when her Niece read it, and was delighted.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Wordsworth : Excursion, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 18 February 1815: 'William and Mary and little Willy paid a visit to old Mrs Knott yesterday with the Ex[cursio]n in hand, William intending to read to the old Lady the history of the Grasmere Knight. She could not hear his loud voice; but understood the story very well when her Niece read it, and was greatly delighted. Today they have returned the Book, and poor Miss K has written a complimentary but alas! unintelligible note ... she concludes by saying ... that she had written to Kendal to order the Book. She says she had been told by Mrs Green and others that it was above their capacity, and of course above hers, but what she had read had given her infinite delight. I tell William that the family made a trading voyage of it. Certainly the Book would never have been bought by Miss K. if Willy and his Father and Mother had stayed quietly at home.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Miss Knott      Print: Book

  

Anna Maria Porter : Recluse of Norway, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 18 February 1815: 'Mary is deep in the 2nd volume of the "Recluse of Norway" by Miss Porter - there is a wonderful cleverness in this book, and notwithstanding the badness of the style the 1st vol is very interesting. I began the 2nd last night but could do no more than skim it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Anna Maria Porter : Recluse of Norway, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 18 February 1815: 'Mary is deep in the 2nd volume of the "Recluse of Norway" by Miss Porter - there is a wonderful cleverness in this book, and notwithstanding the badness of the style the 1st vol is very interesting. I began the 2nd last night but could do no more than skim it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Edmund Spenser : Fairy Queen, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 18 February 1815: 'It is 11 o'clock. William has been reading the Fairy Queen - he has laid aside his Book and Mary has set about putting her nightcap.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Christopher Wordsworth : sermons

Dorothy Wordsworth to Priscilla Wordsworth, 27 February 1815: 'The day before yesterday Miss Alne dined with us, and from her we learned that Chris[topher Wordsworth]'s sermons were just arrived at Brathay, so William walked to B. with Miss A. and borrowed one volume - It is the second. William and Mary have read several of the sermons and are very much delighted with them ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Christopher Wordsworth : sermons

Dorothy Wordsworth to Priscilla Wordsworth, 27 February 1815: 'The day before yesterday Miss Alne dined with us, and from her we learned that Chris[topher Wordsworth]'s sermons were just arrived at Brathay, so William walked to B. with Miss A. and borrowed one volume - It is the second. William and Mary have read several of the sermons and are very much delighted with them ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Christopher Wordsworth : sermons

Dorothy Wordsworth to Priscilla Wordsworth, 27 February 1815: 'The day before yesterday Miss Alne dined with us, and from her we learned that Chris[topher Wordsworth]'s sermons were just arrived at Brathay, so William walked to B. with Miss A. and borrowed one volume - It is the second. William and Mary have read several of the sermons and are very much delighted with them - I have not yet had leisure when the book has been at liberty and have only snatched a look at the subjects and the mode of treating them which appear to me to be very interesting. Pleased I was to greet that discourse upon Paul and Festus which I heard my Brother preach at Binfield ... I have not read any part of the sermon on Paul and Festus; but on looking it over it seems to me as if it had been shortened ... The only sermon on which I can say I have read any part is that upon National Education and an excellent discourse it appears to be.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : [information about the Corn Laws]

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 16 March 1815: 'Buonaparte seems quite to have put the Corn Laws out of our heads. William has however carefully read all that has been said about them, and his opinion is ... that 80 is too high a price for the standard ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

William Wordsworth : extracts from The Excursion

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 16 March 1815: 'William has made a conquest of holy Hannah [More], though she had not seen the Book [The Excursion], had seen nothing but the extracts in the Edinbrough [sic] Review. She intends to buy it; but is waiting for a cheaper Edition.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah More      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Edinburgh Review

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 16 March 1815: 'William has made a conquest of holy Hannah [More], though she had not seen the Book [The Excursion], had seen nothing but the extracts in the Edinbrough [sic] Review. She intends to buy it; but is waiting for a cheaper Edition.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah More      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 8 April 1815, on following progress of Napoleon in British press: 'Those villainous Sunday newspapers are my abhorrence - I read in one the other day the following sentiment "Surely it would be wise that the Allies should at length give Buonaparte time to show whether he is sincere or not!" In other words give him time to be quite prepared to fence himself in his wickedness.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Sara Hutchinson, 8 April 1815: 'I see by last night's paper (we take the evening Mail) that Murat stands against Buon[aparte].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Walter Scott : Guy Mannering

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 25 April 1815: 'You mentioned Guy Mannering in your last. I have read it. I cannot say that I was disappointed, for there is very considerable talent displayed ... But the adventures I think are not well chosen or well executed ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Scott : Visit to Paris in 1814

William Wordsworth to John Scott, 14 May 1815: 'Amid the hurry consequent upon a recent arrival, with a view to a short Residence in London - I have found leisure to peruse the volume [Scott's Visit to Paris (1815)] which you have presented to me ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 28 June 1815, on learning of abdication of Napoleon: '11 o'clock. Before I go to bed I must tell you that, saving grief for the lamentable loss of so many brave men, I have read the newspapers of to-night with unmingled triumph ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : British Critic

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 28 June 1815: 'I have seen the British Critic which contains a Review by a Friend of the Coleridges' which between ourselves I think a very feeble composition.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Johann Joachim Winkelman : Reflections concerning the imitation of the Grecian Artists in Painting and Sculpture, in a series of Letters'

William Wordsworth to B. R. Haydon, 21 December 1815: 'Have you read the works of the Abbe [Johann Joachim] Winkelman on the study of the Antique, in Painting and Sculpture ... His Works are unknown to me, except a short treatise entitled Reflections concerning the imitation of the Grecian Artists in Painting and Sculpture, in a series of Letters. A translation of this is all I have read having met with it the other day upon a Stal[l] at Penrith ... This Book of mine was printed at Glasgow 1766.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Captain Luff : journal

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 23 December 1815: 'We have now nine sheets of the journal [by Captain Luff re time in Mauritius] - I do not intend to read it until we have the whole, yet I have looked at and been detained by many parts and carried away, until the lively recollection of our dear Friend ... became so painful that I stopped ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Sheet

  

William Wordsworth : Excursion, The

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 31 December 1815: 'In reading the 3rd Book of the Excursion last night what a pang did I feel for our poor widowed Friend Mrs Luff when I came to these lines "Oh never let the Wretched, if a choice / Be left him, trust the freight of his distress / To a long voyage on the silent deep! ... "'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Scott : Paris Revisited in 1815 by way of Brussels

William Wordsworth to John Scott, 22 February 1816: 'Your Paris Revisited has been in constant use since I received it ... Nothing in your works has charmed us more than the lively manner in which the painting of everything that passes before your eyes is executed.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Robert Southey : [Poet's Pilgrimage to Waterloo, The]

William Wordsworth to John Scott, 25 February 1816, on own and contemporaries' endeavours to celebrate victory at Waterloo in verse: 'Southey is a Fellow labourer. I have seen but little of his performance, but that little gave me great pleasure.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Christopher Wordsworth : A sermon preached in the Chapel of Lambeth at the Consecration of the Hon. and Right Rev. Henry Ryder, Lord Bishop of Gloucester, 1815

William Wordsworth to Christopher Wordsworth: 'We thank you for your Consecration Sermon, which we received free of expense. We have read it with much pleasure, and unite in thinking it excellently adapted to the occasion. For my own part, I liked it still better upon the second than the first reading.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Christopher Wordsworth : A sermon preached in the Chapel of Lambeth at the Consecration of the Hon. and Right Rev. Henry Ryder, Lord Bishop of Gloucester, 1815

William Wordsworth to Christopher Wordsworth: "We thank you for your Consecration Sermon, which we received free of expense. We have read it with much pleasure, and unite in thinking it excellently adapted to the occasion."

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

R. P. Gillies : Illustrations of a Poetical Character, in six Tales, with other Poems

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies (postmarked 9 April 1816): 'Your obliging Present [new book of poems] reached me yesterday ... I read the volume through immediately: and paid particular attention to the parts that were new to me.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : The Champion

William Wordsworth to John Scott: "I have read your late Champions with much pleasure"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodicalManuscript: Letter

  

R. P. Gillies : Rinaldo, a desultory Poem

William Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies: " ... your poem [Rinaldo] I have read with considerable attention."

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Catherine Clarkson : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 10 January 1817, re visit to Mrs Threlkeld (very fond of C. Clarkson) at Halifax: 'I read her your last letter adding a few words for you, which were not there, of remembrance of her and her Daughter ... I hope my little trick ... was at the least an innocent one, and I flatter myself that, in the spirit ... what I made you say was just and true - indeed if I had not felt it to be so I should have been wounded instead of pleased by the pleasure which the dear good old lady expressed in hearing that she was remembered by you.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

anon : [penny dreadfuls]

Statement of boy to London society, aim of which to rescue juvenile criminals, demonstrating pernicious influence of penny dreadfuls: "Bill couldn't read a bit, but he knowed boys that could, and he used to hear 'em reading about Knights of the Road, and Claude Duval and Skeleton Crews, till I suppose his head got regler stuffed with it. He never had no money to buy a pen'orth when it came out, so he used to lay wait for me, carrying my younger sister over his shoulder, when I came out of school at dinner time, and gammon me over to come along with him to a shop on the corner of Rosamond street in Clerkenwell, where there used to be a whole lot of the penny numbers in the window. They was all of a row, Wildfire Jack, the Boy Highwayman, Dick Turpin, and ever so many others -just the first page, don't you know, and the picture. Well, I liked it too, and I used to go along o' Bill and read to him all the reading on the front page and look at the pictures until -'specially on Mondays when there was altogether a new lot -Bill would always get so worked up with the aggravatin' little bits, which always left off where you wanted to turn over and see what was on the next leaf..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charley      Print: Serial / periodical, penny dreadful

  

 : Tyburn Dick

Statement of boy to London society, aim of which to rescue juvenile criminals, demonstrating pernicious influence of penny dreadfuls: Charley reads penny dreadfuls to his brother Bill from the shop window almost every week; one of the serials they read each week is "Tyburn Dick", which gets Bill particularly worked up; They went to the shop, but couldn't find out the conclusion to the serial without purchasing it; therefore they stole the penny number to read at home. Charley concludes to the society: "That was the commencement of it; and so it went on and growed bigger".

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charley ?      Print: Serial / periodical, penny dreadful

  

 : 

Evidence to Parliamentary Committee from Rev. Thomas Spencer, a Church of England clergyman: "I was appealed to in the parish of which I was incumbent for 22 years, by the wife and children of a man who was coming home drunk very frequently and I went to speak to him and he said, 'I tell you, Sir, I never go to the public house for beer, I go for the news; I have no other way of getting it; I cannot afford to pay the five pence, but unfortunately I go on drinking till I have spent a shilling, and I might as well have bought the paper in the first instance; still, that is my reason, my only reason for going to the public house; I hear people read the paper and say what is going on in London, and it is the only place where I get the news.'"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Newspaper

  

G.W.M. Reynolds : The Mysteries of the Court of London

Evidence of Abel Heywood to Select Committee considering abolition of newspaper stamps: "This 'Court of London' I consider is a test of the taste of the readers generally; I think between this 'Court of London' and the others [other cheap publications] there is a very wide line of distinction; I have read some portion of it, and it draws scenes of profligacy as strongly as it is possible for any writer to do, and the feelings are excited to a very high pitch by it; indeed some look upon it as an indecent publication; but it is not in reality an indecent publication because I do not believe that any words appear that are vulgar; but certainly the language is of a more exciting kind and directed to excite the passions of its readers."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Abel Heywood      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Family Herald

Evidence of Abel Heywood to Select Committee considering abolition of newspaper stamps: "I take home the 'Family Herald', and read it with a great deal of pleasure, and it is read by every member of my family"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Abel Heywood      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Family Herald

Evidence of Abel Heywood to Select Committee considering abolition of newspaper stamps: "I take home the 'Family Herald', and read it with a great deal of pleasure, and it is read by every member of my family"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Heywood family     Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : The Examiner

Evidence of William Edward Hickson to Select Committee on Newspaper stamps: "My experience is this: that what interested me most of all in newspaper reading, and what first formed the habit of reading with me, was reading the accidents and offences in the 'Examiner' newspaper. There were two volumes which my father had had bound up for the years 1808 and 1809; and when I was just beginning to read to got hold of them, and read through the accidents and offences in those two volumes. Now I should never look at those accidents and offences, but I read the leading articles. So that it really produced this effect: it was the means of developing my intellectual powers and I believe that a similar kind of reading would produce the same effect generally throughout the country."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Edward Hickson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Maidstone Gazette

Evidence of William Edward Hickson to Select Committee on Newspaper stamps: "I find even with myself coming to London occasionally only as I do now, that I really take more interest in the 'Maidstone Gazette' than I do in the 'Times' paper though I read them both."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Edward Hickson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : The Times

Evidence of William Edward Hickson to Select Committee on Newspaper stamps: "I find even with myself coming to London occasionally only as I do now, that I really take more interest in the 'Maidstone Gazette' than I do in the 'Times' paper though I read them both."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Edward Hickson      Print: Newspaper

  

 : The Times

Evidence of William Edward Hickson to Select Committee on Newspaper stamps: "I formed in the village where I am now living, when I first went there, an evening class of adult labourers, and as I was then very much interested in some very able articles that were being published in the 'Times', I thought I would read them to them in the evening; but I found that we did not get on at all; and upon cross-examination of some of my auditors afterwards, I discovered, to my surprise, that I could not read 20 lines of the leading article of the 'Times' without finding that there were 20 words in it which none of my auditors understood. I remember one passage which not one of the agricultural labourers to whom I was reading understood at all. The editor was speaking of some operation of our fleet in the channel; the word 'operations' puzzled them, the word 'fleet' puzzled them; they did not know what a fleet was, and they had not the slightest idea of what the channel meant."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Edward Hickson      Print: Newspaper

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of a juvenile offender: "I have been twice in prison. I was only in Liverpool two days. I came from Manchester to the races; I had no work. I have been at all the theatres... I have robbed my parents to satisfy my desire to go to the theatres; ...I have seen 'Jack Sheppard' performed; I think it will be the means of inducing boys to copy his tricks. I have read his life; many boys have it."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: H.T.      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, read as numbers or volume?

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of a juvenile offender: "I have been five times in prison. I have been as the Sanspareil and at all the theatres... I am sure had I never known the theatres I should have been quite a different character at this day. I have heard 'Jack Sheppard' performed; I was very fond of it; I had his life, but some boy took it from me; most boys have his life."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: T.A      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of a juvenile offender: "I came from Manchester to the races. I was taken into custody when I had only been in Liverpool two days. I was taken up for attempting to pick pockets... Theatres are very exciting. I never saw 'Jack Sheppard' performed; I have read his history; I have seen many boys buy his history; I borrowed mine from another boy."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: G.G.      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of a juvenile offender: "I have been three times in prison and once discharged. I have been at the Sanspareil and Amphitheatre; I have also been at the penny hop... I am sure the theatres would bring any youngster to ruin: they don't care where they get their money, so that they do but get it to join their companions. I was very fond of seeing 'Jack Sheppard' performed. I have read his life; I bought it."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.M.      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of a juvenile offender: "I was never in prison before. I have been twice discharged, and am now waiting for trial... I have heard the 'Life of Jack Sheppard' read; it did not lead me to think of anything good, but I am sure it would lead young folks to do everything bad. The man I heard read it lived in a house in Gore-street, and sold penny-beer, asnd other things: it is a house where men and boys meet"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of a juvenile offender: "I have been nine times in prison and once discharged, and am now waiting trial... I never saw 'Jack Sheppard' performed. I have read his life and heard a great deal about him. I think that those who read his life are not likely to reap any good, or those that see the play performed, I am sure will get no good."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: T.E.      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I have been six times in prison and four times discharged, and am now waiting trial... I have been to all the theatres... I never saw 'Jack Sheppard' performed. I have often heard and read about him: they all seem to say he was a great man and a great prison breaker; and when he was at liberty like a gentleman."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: M.F.      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I have been twice in prison and am now waiting trial... I have seen 'Jack Sheppard' performed; have read part of his life; I thought the play was very interesting; I am sure it did not create in me any bad thoughts, nor increase my desire to follow bad pratices..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: A.L.      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, not sure if penny parts or volume

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I have been six times in prison, and four times discharged... Never saw 'Jack Sheppard' performed; have read his life and often heard speak of him; he was very clever."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.F.      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, not sure if penny parts or volume

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I have been four times in prison and twice discharged... I never saw Jack Sheppard performed; I have heard boys talk of him, and have heard my father read his life"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, not sure if penny parts or volume

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I never was in prison before. I have been at the Sanspareil, and at all the other theatres, except the Queen's. I never saw 'Jack Sheppard' performed. I have heard the prisoners speak about it many times: some would speak well of the play, others would say it was most of it false. I have read his Life; I think myself it is mostly false; there may have been such a man, but I think he could not go through all the exploits that is spoken of."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.B.      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, not sure if penny parts or volume

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I never was in prison before. I was taken into custody for attempting to rob my master... I never saw 'Jack Sheppard' performed; I have read part of his life; I think he was a clever man; I don't know that reading his life created any difference in my mind."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.H.      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, not sure if penny parts or volume

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "I thought this 'Jack Sheppard' was a clever fellow for making his escape and robbing his master. If I could get out of gaol I think I should be as clever as him; but after all his exploits he got done at last. I have had the book out of a library at Dale Field. I paid 2d a book for three volumes. I also got 'Richard Turpin' in two volumes and paid the same."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.L.      Print: Book

  

William Harrison Ainsworth : Jack Sheppard

Statement of juvenile offender: "When I left school I went to Mr Banks, bookseller, two years. I had good opportunities of reading then, voyages and such; read the Life of Jack Sheppard. I borrowed it from another boy... I read 'Jack Sheppard' about five months before I began the robberies."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.H.      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books about voyages]

Statement of juvenile offender: "When I left school I went to Mr Banks, bookseller, two years. I had good opportunities of reading then, voyages and such; read the Life of Jack Sheppard. I borrowed it from another boy... I read 'Jack Sheppard' about five months before I began the robberies."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.H.      Print: Book

  

 : Life of Nelson

Statement about juvenile offender: "attended the Independent Sunday-school three years, also the national school three years (same time). Learned to read and write. Can read and write still. He has read much since he left school; read the 'Life of Nelson' and 'Gilderoy' -a playbook, which gives an account of robberies and escaping from prison; also some story books"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.S.      Print: Book

  

 : Gilderoy

Statement about juvenile offender: "attended the Independent Sunday-school three years, also the national school three years (same time). Learned to read and write. Can read and write still. He has read much since he left school; read the 'Life of Nelson' and 'Gilderoy' -a playbook, which gives an account of robberies and escaping from prison; also some story books"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.S.      Print: Book

  

 : [story books]

Statement about juvenile offender: "attended the Independent Sunday-school three years, also the national school three years (same time). Learned to read and write. Can read and write still. He has read much since he left school; read the 'Life of Nelson' and 'Gilderoy' -a playbook, which gives an account of robberies and escaping from prison; also some story books"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.S.      Print: Book

  

 : Child's First Book

Report of prison chaplain on the progress of prisoner: "From his first arrival in gaol, he had been attended by the schoolmaster; and one day, when I examined his progress in learning to read, I was surprised and delighted to find that he had not only acquired the mechanical ability to spell and read words of one syllable, but, which was of much more consequence, that he was applying the simple lessons in the 'Child's First Book' to the very best purpose. The great truths contained in the little words of that book were finding their way into his mind..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.G.      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Antony and Cleopatra

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Antony and Cleopatra, by an editorial note by Steevens, which reminds the reader that Cleopatra's story of the salt fish on Antony's hook was taken from North's Plutarch]: "Yes, but how happily introduced, and with what skill and spirit worked up by Shakespeare!"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Coriolanus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Coriolanus, by a note by Warburton regarding the composition of the Senate] "Absurd! Who knows anything about the usages of the Senate, and the privileges of the Tribunes, in Coriolanus's time?"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Coriolanus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Coriolanus, by a note by Warburton regarding the history of the Roman Consular Government]: "Well! but there had certainly been elective magistracies in Rome before the expulsion of the kings, and there might have been canvassing. Shakspeare [sic] cared so little about historical accuracy that an editor who notices expressions, which really are not grossly inaccurate, is unpardonable."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Coriolanus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Coriolanus, by a note by Warburton regarding the creation of the first Censor, which suggests that Shakespeare had misread his authorities]: "This undoubtedly was a mistake, and what DOES it matter?"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Coriolanus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Coriolanus, on the last page]: "A noble play. As usual, Shakspeare [sic] had thumbed his translation of Plutarch to rags."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Hesiod : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Athenaeus : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cato : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Livy : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Sallust : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Aulus Gellius : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Suetonius : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : De Finibus

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "Those two parallel lines in pencil, which were his highest form of compliment, are scored down page after page of the De Finibus, the Academic Questions, and the Tusculan Disputations."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Academic Questions

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "Those two parallel lines in pencil, which were his highest form of compliment, are scored down page after page of the De Finibus, the Academic Questions, and the Tusculan Disputations."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Tusculan Disputations

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "Those two parallel lines in pencil, which were his highest form of compliment, are scored down page after page of the De Finibus, the Academic Questions, and the Tusculan Disputations."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : De Finibus

[Macaulay's marginalia at the end of the first book of Cicero's De Finibus]: "Exquisitely written, graceful, calm, luminous and full of interest; but the Epicurean theory of morals is hardly deserving of refutation."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : De Natura Deorum

[Macaulay's marginalia in Cicero's De Natura Deorum]: "Equal to anything that Cicero ever did."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : De Divinatione

[Macaulay's marginalia in the Second Book of Cicero's De Divinatione]: double-lines down the margin of the argument against the credibility of visions and prophecies.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Ben Jonson : Catiline

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Ben Jonson's Catiline, by the lines 'Lentulus: The augurs all are constant I am meant / Catiline: They had lost their science else.']: "The dialogue here is good and natural. but it is strange that so excellent a scholar as Ben Jonson should represent the Augurs as giving any encouragement to Lentulus's dreams. The Augurs were the first nobles of Rome. In this generation Pompey, Hortensius, Cicero, and other men of the same class, belonged to the College."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Ben Cicero : Tusculan Disputations

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, by the translations from Aeschylus and Sophocles in the Second Book]: "Cicero's best".

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Letters

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Cicero's Letters, opposite the sentences 'Meum factum probari abs te [...] nihil enim malo quam et me mei similem esse, et illos sui', translated as 'I triumph and rejoice that my action should have sustained your approval [...] for there is nothing which I so much covet as that I should be like myself, and they like themselves]: "Noble fellow!"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Speeches

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's marginalia on Cicero's speeches]: "Macaulay's pencilled observations upon each successive speech of Cicero form a continuous history of the great orator's public career, and a far from unsympathetic analysis of his mobile, and singularly interesting, character."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Letters to Atticus

Macaulay's marginalia on Cicero's Epistles to Atticus]: "A kind-hearted man [Cicero], with all his faults." Later, "Poor fellow! He makes a pitiful figure. But it is impossible not to feel for him. Since I left England I have not despised Cicero and Ovid for their lamentations in exile as much as I did."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Second Philippic

[Macaulay's marginalia on Cicero's Second Philippic]: "a most wonderful display of rhetorical talent, worthy of all its fame."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Third Philippic

[Macaulay's marginalia on Cicero's Third Philippic]: "The close of this speech is very fine. His later and earlier speeches have a freedom and an air of sincerity about them which, in the interval between his Consulship and Caesar's death, I do not find. During that interval he was mixed up with the aristocratical party, and yet afraid of the Triumvirate. When all the great party-leaders were dead, he found himself at the head of the state, and spoke with a boldness and energy which he had not shown since his youthful days."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Cicero : Last Philippic

[Macaulay's marginalia at the end of Cicero's last Philippic]: "As a man, I think of Cicero much as I always did, except that I am more disgusted with his conduct after Caesar's death. I really think that he met with little more than his deserts from the Triumvirs. It is quite certain, as Livy says, that he suffered nothing more than he would have inflicted."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus]: "It seems incredible that these absurdities of Dionysodorus and Euthydemus should have been mistaken for wisdom, even by the weakest of mankind. I can hardly help thinking that Plato has overcharged the portrait. But the humour of the dialogue is admirable."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus]: "Glorious irony!"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus]: "Incomparably ludicrous!"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus]: "No writer, not even Cervantes, was so great a master of this solemn ridicule as Plato."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus]: "There is hardly any comedy, in any language, more diverting than this dialogue. It is not only richly humorous. The characters are most happily sustained and discriminated. The contrast between the youthful petulance of Ctesippus and the sly, sarcastic mock humility of Socrates is admirable."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus]: "Dulcissima hercle, eademque nobilissima vita."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Euthydemus

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Euthydemus, below the last line of the dialogue]: "Calcutta, May 1835."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Republic

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Republic]: "Plato has been censured with great justice for his doctrine about the community of women and the exposure of children. But nobody, as far as I remember, has done justice to him on one important point. No ancient politician appears to have thought so highly of the capacity of women, and to have been inclined to make them so important."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Republic

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Republic]: "You may see that Plato was passionately fond of poetry, even when arguing against it."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Republic

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Republic, by the passage where Plato recommends a broader patriotism]: "This passage does Plato great honour. Philhellenism is a step towards philanthropy. There is an enlargement of mind in this work which I do not remember to have found in any earlier composition, and in very few ancient works, either earlier or later."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Republic

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Republic, in the Second Book, by the discussion of abstract justice]: "This is indeed a noble dream. Pity that it should come through the gate of ivory!"

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Republic

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Republic, in the Eighth Book]: "I remember nothing in Greek philosophy superior to this in profundity, ingenuity, and eloquence."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Protagoras

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Protagoras]: "A very lively picture of Athenian manners. There is scarcely anywhere so interesting a view of the interior of a Greek house in the most interesting age of Greece."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Protagoras

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Protagoras]: "Callias seems to have been a munificent and courteous patron of learning. What with sophists, what with pretty women, and what with sycophants, he came to the end of a noble fortune."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Protagoras

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Protagoras]: "Alcibiades is very well represented here. It is plain that he wants only to get up a row among the sophists."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Protagoras

[Macaulay's marginalia in his copy of Plato's Protagoras]: "Protagoras seems to deserve the character he gives himself. Nothing can be more courteous and generous than his language. Socrates shows abundance of talent and acuteness in this dialogue; but the more I read of his conversation, the less I wonder at the fierce hatred he provoked. He evidently had an ill-natured pleasure in making men, - particularly men famed for wisdom and eloquence, - look like fools." [the comments continue at some length.]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia at the beginning of Plato's Gorgias]: "This was my favourite dialogue at College. I do not know whether I shall like it as well now. May 1, 1837."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias]: "Polus is much in the right. Socrates abused scandalously the advantages which his wonderful talents, and his command of temper, gave him."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Maraulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias]: "You have made a blunder, and Socrates will have you in an instant."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias]: "Hem! Retiarium astutum!" [Cunning netter].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias]: "There you are in the Sophist's net. I think that, if I had been in the place of Polus, Socrates would hardly have had so easy a job of it."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias]: "What a command of his temper the old fellow [Callicles] had, and what terrible, though delicate, ridicule! A bitter fellow, too, with all his suavity."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias]: "This is not pure morality; but there is a good deal of weight in what Callicles says. He is wrong in not perceiving that the real happiness, not only of the weak many, but of the able few, is promoted by virtue. [...] When I read this dialogue as a lad at college, I wrote a trifling piece for Knight's Magazine, in which some Athenian characters were introduced, I made this Callicles the villain of the drama. I now see that he was merely a fair specimen of the public men of Athens in that age. Although his principles were those of aspiring and voluptuous men in unquiet times, his feelings seem to have been friendly and kind."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia at the end of the dialogue in Plato's Gorgias]: "This is one of the finest passages in Greek literature. Plato is a real poet."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia at the end of the dialogue in Plato's Gorgias. He marks the the doctrine "that we ought to be more afraid of wronging than of being wronged, and that the prime business of every man is, not to seem good, but to be good, in all his private and public dealings" with three pencil lines, and writes]: "This just and noble conclusion atones for much fallacy in the reasoning by which Socrates arrived at it [...] it is impossible not to consider it [the Gorgias] as one of the greatest performances which have descended to us from that wonderful generation."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias, by the trial of Socrates, when Socrates expressed a serene conviction that to die is gain, even if death were nothing more than an untroubled and dreamless sleep]: "Milton thought otherwise" [Macaulay quotes the lines "Sad cure! For who would lose,/Though full of pain, this intellectual being;/ Those thoughts that wander through eternity?"] "I once thought with Milton; but every day brings me nearer and nearer the doctrine here laid down by Socrates."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

R. P. Gillies : Oswald, A Metrical Tale

'I have read your Poem. I like it better than any of the preceding ones.'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : case of Stuart versus Lovell

Wiliam Wordsworth to Daniel Stuart, 22 June 1817: 'By the bye, it was not till this morning that I read the case of Stuart versus Lovell. What a miscreant - If I had been upon the Jury, and had found that man possessed property that would bear the damages I should have fixed upon ?700 the precise sum which he accused you of embezzling ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Samuel Taylor : Coleridge

Wiliam Wordsworth to R. P. Gillies, 19 [Sept] 1817: 'I have not read Mr. Coleridge's "Biographia", having contented myself with skimming parts of it ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Lord Lonsdale : 

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 13 Feb 1818: 'I dined at the Wakefields yesterday. Mr John W. senior broke out on the dependent and enslaved State of the County etc. I said that I had accepted his Son's invitation, to testify my respect for his family, and my personal regard for his Son ... I begged to state that as to the fact of the county being represented by two of the Family of Lowther no person lamented it more than your Lordship. I then read part of that sentence in your Letter where you speak of it as a misfortune ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

 : 

Transcribed in letter from William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, [c.25 February 1818]: 'If money I lack The shirt on my back Shall off - and go to the hammer; For though with bare skin By G- I'll be in, And raise up a radical clamour! Placard for a Poll bearing an old Shirt.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Handbill

  

 : Kendal Chronicle

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 14 March 1818: 'If you continue to read the Kendal Chronicle you must be greatly concerned to see that the Liberty of the Press should be so grossly abused. This Paper as now conducted reminds me almost at every sentence of those which I used to read in France during the heat of the Revolution.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : [French newspapers]

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 14 March 1818: 'If you continue to read the Kendal Chronicle you must be greatly concerned to see that the Liberty of the Press should be so grossly abused. This Paper as now conducted reminds me almost at every sentence of those which I used to read in France during the heat of the Revolution.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Thomas Clarkson : letter to Mr Wakefield

Dorothy Wordsworth describing progress of electioneering in Kendal to Sara Hutchinson, 24 March 1818: 'This morning ... [William Crackenthorp] called ... just before he was setting off with [Henry] B[rougham] on his canvass [he] ran down to us in out-of-breath haste to read us a letter just received from Mr Clarkson to Mr Wakefield [refusing support to Lowthers in election] ... it was a beautiful, a delightful letter ... after he had read the letter he hurried off ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Crackenthorp      

  

Thomas Clarkson : 

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, [27 March 1818]: 'I should at this moment determine to go over to Lowther tomorrow, did I not think that I may be more useful to the cause, by remaining at home for the purpose of preparing an answer to a Letter of Mr Clarkson to the Kendal Comm: of Brougham, which will appear in the Chronicle tomorrow; and which I am sure will injure your interests ... The original of the Letter I have seen, but could not procure a copy. - It was shewn me by Mr Crackenthorp [of opposing party interest] with the high-flying expression, "We reckon it as good as 50 votes!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Clarkson : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 30 March 1818: 'Mr Clarkson's letter [refusing support to Lowther interest in Westmorland elections] was published in yesterday's paper; and I have read it with delight, as an admirable letter and a faithful picture of his noble mind, but I feel assured that it will serve a cause which he would not wish to serve if he were acquainted with all its bearings.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Thomas De Quincey : Close Comments on a Straggling Speech

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 6 April 1818: 'Had the Correspondence [between Henry Brougham and William Wilberforce, 1806] been published upon Mr B[rougham]'s first appearance in the Country, I think it might have done much service ... the sooner it sees the light the better. With Lord L[owther']'s approbation I have glanced at it, in a passage added to some able Comments on Mr B[rougham]'s first speech at Kendal, by a Friend of mine, which are about to appear.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Thomas De Quincey : Close Comments on a Straggling Speech

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, [c. 14 April 1818]: 'The notes upon [Henry] Brougham's Speech, I have not seen, unless they be those from the pen of Mr De Quincey of Grasmere, which ... you may have forgotten that we read together at Kendal, - and that a passage was interwoven by me, at that time.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth, Viscount Lowther     

  

Henry Brougham : A Letter to Sir Samuel Romilly upon the Abuse of Charities

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, 22 September 1818: 'Your two interesting Letters, the Pamphlet, and Sun and Chronicle, have been duly received ... The Pamphlet I have carefully read ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Viscount Lowther : 

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, 8 December 1818: 'I have seen Mr Fleming, and told him everything you wished ... I read him a considerable part of your last Letter ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

William Wordsworth : letter to Revd. John Russell

William Wordsworth to Christopher Wordsworth, 1 January 1819: 'Mr Monkhouse will probably have shewn you the copy of Mr Russel's Letter [on Madras method of education], as I learn he has already done of mine to him ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

 : dictionary

William Wordsworth describes his eldest son's slowness in reading to his brother Christopher Wordsworth, 1 January 1819: ' ... he is so long in finding his words in his dictionary ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Samuel Rogers : Human Life, A Poem

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham, 19 February 1819: '[Samuel] Rogers read me his Poem when I was in Town about 2 months ago; but I have heard nothing of it since.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Rogers      

  

 : Blackwood's Magazine

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham, 19 February 1819: 'I know little of Blackwood's Magazine, and wish to know less. I have seen in it articles so infamous that I do not chuse to let it enter my doors. The Publishers sent it to me some time ago, and I begged (civilly you will take for granted) not to be troubled with it any longer.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Francis Wrangham : translation of Virgil, Eclogues

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham, 19 February 1819: 'I ought to have thanked you before for your versions of Virgil's Eclogues, which reached me at last. I have lately compared it line for line with the original, and think it very well done ... I think I mentioned to you that these Poems of Virgil have always delighted me much; there is frequently in them an elegance and a happiness that no translation can hope to equal. In point of fidelity your translation is very good indeed.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Virgil : Eclogues

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham, 19 February 1819: 'I ought to have thanked you before for your versions of Virgil's Eclogues, which reached me at last. I have lately compared it line for line with the original, and think it very well done ... I think I mentioned to you that these Poems of Virgil have always delighted me much; there is frequently in them an elegance and a happiness that no translation can hope to equal. In point of fidelity your translation is very good indeed.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Plato : Gorgias

[Macaulay's marginalia in Plato's Gorgias, at the end of the trial of Socrates]: "A most solemn and noble close! Nothing was ever written, or spoken, approaching in sober sublimity to the latter part of the Apology. It is impossible to read it without feeling one's mind elevated and strengthened."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

 : [List of Applicants for Enfranchisement]

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 7 April 1819: 'Having occasion to go to Sockbridge along with our Rector, Mr Jackson, I begged of Mr Lumb to meet us there. he did so - he shewed us a List of Applicants for Enfranchisement ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Plato : Crito

[Macaulay's marginalia on the last page of the Crito]: There is much that may be questioned in the reasoning of Socrates; but it is impossible not to admire the wisdom and virtue which it indicates. When we consider the moral state of Greece in his time, and the revolution which he produced in men's notions of good and evil, we must pronounce him one of the greatest men that ever lived."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

 : Quarterly Review

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 22 May [1819]: 'I have deferred thanking your Lordship for your kind attention in sending me (through the hands of Col: Lowther) the Q[uarterly]. R[eview]., till I could give it an attentive perusal. This I have now done, and been most gratified.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Juvenal : 

I remember paying him [Macaulay] a visit in his rose-garden at Campden Hill [...] I was in a hurry to communicate to him my discovery of the magnificent verses in which Juvenal bids observe how the world's two mightiest orators [Cicero and Demosthenes] were brought by their genius and eloquence to a violent and tragic death.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Otto Trevelyan      Print: Book

  

 : [list of new freeholders]

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 16 June 1819: 'On looking over Mr Lumb's list of new freeholders in this neighbourhood, I was sorry to find that half a dozen whose names I expected to see were not there - owing, principally to delays at Kendal in executing the deeds ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

 : Edinburgh Review

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 16 June 1819: 'I have seen the Article in the E[dinburgh]. R[eview]. [re Charities Question] - it is as your Lordship describes, feeble and false ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Hans Busk : Vestriad, The

William Wordsworth to Hans Busk, 6 July 1819: 'Dear Sir, Your writings are not to be hurried over; this must plead my excuse for not having thanked you earlier for the "Vestriad"; which, though detained on the road, by a fault of some of Mr Longman's people ... reached me some time since ... I was particularly pleased with the descents into the submarine regions, and the infernal. These two Cantos I liked best ... The serious passages ... will excite a wish in many as they did in me, that you would favour the world with something in downright earnest ... I noticed in your Vestriad with particular pleasure, your flight in the Balloon.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

J. G. Crump : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Joanna Hutchinson, 5 September 1819: 'We have been very comfortable and without the least bustle until last night when before the Gentlemen had left the dining room our loquacious Friend Mr Myers arrived half tipsy. He produced a letter he had received from Mr Crump and his own answer to it, four sides of a folio sheet which he deputed Mr Monkhouse to read to the gentlemen, and his own comments upon it were loud and long, with stamping and gestures ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Monkhouse      Manuscript: Letter, Sheet

  

 : Guardian, The

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, [mid December 1819]: 'The Guardian a loyal Newspaper has found its way here. It promises well but a weekly London paper crowded with advertizements, is not likely to suit the Country. It is dated Sunday, also; this would prove an objection to its circulation in many houses in the country, especially as I observe Quack medicines, etc. etc. - advertized.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : advertisements

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, [mid December 1819]: 'The Guardian a loyal Newspaper has found its way here. It promises well but a weekly London paper crowded with advertizements, is not likely to suit the Country. It is dated Sunday, also; this would prove an objection to its circulation in many houses in the country, especially as I observe Quack medicines, etc. etc. - advertized.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Advertisement, Newspaper

  

unknown : unknown

Dorothy Wordsworth to Cathrine Clarkson, 19 December 1819: 'I do not know whther I ought to tell you that [Sara Hutchinson] is most eagerly and happily employed in knitting yarn stockings for Mr Clarkson. She knits and reads by the hour together.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      

  

[A Westmorland Inhabitant and Freeholder] Anon : unknown

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, 31 December 1819: 'In the last Kendal Chronicle appeared a most malignant misrepresentation of the words you used upon the searching for arms Bill ... I was requested to animadvert upon this Letter, which indeed I had felt some disposition to do when I first read it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Kendal Chronicle, The

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, 31 December 1819: 'In the last Kendal Chronicle appeared a most malignant misrepresentation of the words you used upon the searching for arms Bill ... I was requested to animadvert upon this Letter, which indeed I had felt some disposition to do when I first read it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Times, The

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 2 February 1820 (following remarks on death of George III): 'The same Paper, the Times, which has brought us this Intelligence, has agitated my Family and myself much by containing, in a most conspicuous part of it, an advertisement declaratory of Mr Brougham's intention once more to disturb the County of West[morla]nd.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Newspaper

  

 : [advertisement]

William Wordsworth to Lord Lonsdale, 2 February 1820 (following remarks on death of George III): 'The same Paper, the Times, which has brought us this Intelligence, has agitated my Family and myself much by containing, in a most conspicuous part of it, an advertisement declaratory of Mr Brougham's intention once more to disturb the County of West[morla]nd.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Advertisement, Newspaper

  

 : prayers

Dorothy Wordsworth describes church service attended in London in letter to Mary Hutchinson, 5 May 1820: 'Tom and I went with [Mr Johnson] last Sunday but one to the opening of a handsome Chapel given by a Mr Watson to the National Society [for education of poor]. The B[isho]p of London preached, Mr Johnson read prayers, and Mr Wiliam Coleridge (who is appointed morning preacher) read the Communion Service. All the duty was admirably performed ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Johnson      Print: Book

  

 : Communion Service

Dorothy Wordsworth describes church service attended in London in letter to Mary Hutchinson, 5 May 1820: 'Tom and I went with [Mr Johnson] last Sunday but one to the opening of a handsome Chapel given by a Mr Watson to the National Society [for education of poor]. The B[isho]p of London preached, Mr Johnson read prayers, and Mr Wiliam Coleridge (who is appointed morning preacher) read the Communion Service. All the duty was admirably performed ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Coleridge      Print: Book

  

 : prayers

Dorothy Wordsworth describes daily routine during stay at her brother Christopher's London residence in letter to Mary Hutchinson, 5 May 1820: ' ... he sits with me till tea is over - goes to his study with candles, and comes up again at 10 - reads prayers and we sit together till bed-time, and often do not part till twelve o'clock.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Wordsworth      

  

William Wordsworth : River Duddon, A Series of Sonnets, The

Lord Lonsdale to William Wordsworth, 1 May 1820: 'I have read the Sonnets on the Duddon, and the notes annexed to them with great Pleasure ... the perusal of them afforded me infinite satisfaction.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lord Lonsdale      Print: Book

  

Thomas Clarkson : sermon

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 3 September [1820]: 'How admirable and to me astonishing the ardour and industry of your good husband - to think of writing a sermon to be read to his Family on the same evening!'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Clarkson      

  

Helen Maria Williams : The Charter; addressed to my nephew Athanase C. L. Coquerel, on his wedding day, 1819

William Wordsworth (visiting Paris) to Helen Maria Williams, [15 October 1820], 'I had the honour of receiving your letter yesterday Evening, together with the several copies of your tender and beautiful Verses ... Allow me this opportunity of expressing the pleasure I shall have in possessing this little tribute from yourself - as also, the gratification which the perusal of both the Poems [including 'The Charter'] has afforded me.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

 : [newspapers]

Dorothy Wordsworth to Thomas Hutchinson, 14 December 1820: 'The news from Hayti [ie Haiti, where revolution had taken place] has grieved Mr Clarkson [friend of King Henri Christophe] very much ... He is anxiously expecting private accounts, having at present heard nothing but through the Newspapers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Clarkson      Print: Newspaper

  

unknown : unknown

Dorothy Wordsworth to Thomas Hutchinson, 14 December 1820, on her nephew William's academic progress: '...he seems yet to have little or no satisfaction in reading alone. He draws and writes of himself but never takes up a Book except when I require it [of him]. I must say he always does it cheefully.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Richard Allestree : Ladies Calling, The

'On 2 May 1812 M[ary] W[ordsworth] wrote to her husband from Hindwell: "I have read the 'Ladies calling' - one of thy books - which pleased me much ... "

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

 : An unfortunate Mother to the infant at her Breast

"[Mark L.] Reed [in Wordsworth: The Chronology of the Middle Years, 1975] judges that [S. T.] C[oleridge] copied this poem ['An unfortunate Mother to her infant at her Breast'] into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book (D[ove]C[ottage] MS 26) during early 1804, before 25 March."

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Aristotle : unknown

Copied by Dorothy Wordsworth into Wordsworth Commonplace Book: 'From Aristotle's Synopsis of the Virtues and Vices "It is the property of fortitude not to be easily terrified by the dread of things pertaining to death; to possess good confidence in things terrible, & presence of mind in dangers; rather to prefer to be put to death worthily, than to be preserved basely; & to be the cause of victory. Further, it is the property of fortitude to labour and endure, and to make valorous exertion an object of choice. But presence of mind, a well-disposed soul, confidence and boldness are the attendants on fortitude: - and besides these industry and patience".'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

Aristotle : unknown

Copied by William Wordsworth into letter to Lady Beaumont, 12 March 1805: 'From Aristotle's Synopsis of the Virtues and Vices "It is the property of fortitude not to be easily terrified by the dread of things pertaining to death; to possess good confidence in things terrible, & presence of mind in dangers; rather to prefer to be put to death worthily, than to be preserved basely; & to be the cause of victory. Further, it is the property of fortitude to labour and endure, and to make valorous exertion an object of choice. But presence of mind, a well-disposed soul, confidence and boldness are the attendants on fortitude: - and besides these industry and patience."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

John Barrow : Travels in China

'Extracts from [John] Barrow's Travels in China appear in the Wordsworth Commonplace Book [Dove Cottage MS 26] ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Book

  

John Barrow : Travels into the Interior of South Africa

'On 19 April 1809 S[ara] H[utchinson] wrote to Mary Monkhouse from Allan Bank, "The nicest model of a churn I ever saw was in 'Barrow's account of the interior of Africa.'"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Print: Book

  

John Beaumont : An Epitaph upon my dear Brother Francis Beaumont

'[Charles] Lamb copied ... [John Beaumont, Bart., the elder, "An Epitaph upon my dear Brother Francis Beaumont"] into his copy of Beaumont and Fletcher's Fifty Comedies and Tragedies (1679).'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Print: Unknown

  

John Beaumont : [poems]

'[Sir George] Beaumont wriote to W[ordsworth] on 10 Aug. 1806, saying: "I am sure you will be pleased with my ancestor (sir Johns) Poems. the more I read them the more I am pleased, his mind was elevated, pious & pure."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir George Beaumont      

  

William Bingley : North Wales: including its scenery, antiquities, customs, and some sketch of its natural history

'In her letter of 18 Oct. 1811 ... S[ara] H[utchinson] told Mary Monkhouse: "I have been dipping into Bingley's Tour of N. Wales." She goes on to copy out two quotations from vol.2 ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Print: Book

  

William Blake : unknown

'[Henry Crabb] Robinson recorded on 24 May 1812 that "I read Wordsworth some of Blake's poems; he was pleased with some of them, and considered Blake as having the elements of poetry a thousand times more than either Byron or Scott."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Crabb Robinson      

  

Robert Bloomfield : Farmer's Boy, The

S. T. Coleridge to James Tobin, 17 Sept 1800: 'What Wordsworth & I have seen of the Farmer's Boy (only a few short extracts) pleased us very much.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Robert Bloomfield : Farmer's Boy, The

S. T. Coleridge to James Tobin, 17 Sept 1800: 'What Wordsworth & I have seen of the Farmer's Boy (only a few short extracts) pleased us very much.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Vincent Bourne : Latin Poems

'In a letter to W[ordsworth] dated 16 April 1815 Lamb remarks: "Since I saw you I have had a treat in the reading way which does not come every day. The Latin Poems of V. Bourne which were quite new to me."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      

  

Henry Brougham : review of Byron, Hours of Idleness

'[Samuel] Rogers reported W[ordsworth]'s reaction to Brougham's harsh review of Byron's first volume: "Wordsworth was spending an evening at Charles Lamb's, when he saw the said critique, which had just appeared. He read it through, and remarked that 'though Byron's verses were probably poor enough, such an attack was abominable ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Henry Brougham : review of Byron, Hours of Idleness

Henry Crabb Robinson on Wordsworth's reading of Henry Brougham's review of Byron, Hours of Idleness: 'I was sitting with Charles Lamb when Wordsworth came in, with fume on his countenance, and the Edinburgh Review in his hand. "I have no patience with these reviewers," he said, "here is a young man, a lord, and a minor ... and these fellows attack him, as if no one may write poetry unless he lives in a garret."'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Frederika Brun : Chamouny beym Sonnenaufgange

'[In Germany] C[oleridge] read [Frederika] Brun's Chamouny beym Sonnenaufgange, which provided the inspiration for his Hymn Before Sunrise, in the Vale of Chamouni.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

George Buchanan : [poems]

'C[oleridge] read [George Buchanan] at Cambridge.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

John Lanne Buchanan : Travels in the Western Hebrides, 1782 to 1790

'W[ordsworth] copied a set of extracts from Buchanan into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book [Dove Cottage MS 26] ... probably between mid-March and 10 June 1807.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Burnet : unknown

'C[oleridge] was reading Burnet in 1795 ... '

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Dr Currie : Life of Burns

'"I well remember the acute sorrow with which, by my own fire-side, I first perused Dr. Currie's Narrative, and some of the letters, particularly of those composed in the latter part of the poet's life," W[ordsworth] wrote in the Letter to a Friend of Robert Burns (1816) ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Robert Burns : letters

'"I well remember the acute sorrow with which, by my own fire-side, I first perused Dr. Currie's Narrative, and some of the letters, particularly of those composed in the latter part of the poet's life," W[ordsworth] wrote in the Letter to a Friend of Robert Burns (1816) ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Byrom : Epigram on the Feuds Between Handel and Bononcini

'De Qunicey's letter of 27 Aug 1810 to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] contains the last two lines of [John] Byrom's epigram ... which she in turn copied in her letter to Catherine Clarkson of 30 Dec. 1810.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      

  

John Byrom : Epigram on the Feuds Between Handel and Bononcini

'De Qunicey's letter of 27 Aug 1810 to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] contains the last two lines of [John] Byrom's epigram ... which she in turn copied in her letter to Catherine Clarkson of 30 Dec. 1810.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : English Bards and Scotch Reviewers

'De Quincey ... in a letter to the Wordsworths of 27 May 1809 said that he had read ... [Byron, English Bards and Scotch Reviewers] "some weeks - or perhaps months - ago: but it is so deplorably dull and silly that I never thought of mentioning it before.'''

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : Childe Harold's Pilgrimage I and II

'On 17-18 May 1812 W[ordsworth] wrote to M[ary] W[ordsworth]: "Yesterday I dined alone with Lady B. - and we read Lord Byron's new poem whch is not destitute of merit; though ill-planned, and often unpleasing in the sentiments, and almost always perplexed in the construction."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : Childe Harold's Pilgrimage I and II

'On 17-18 May 1812 W[ordsworth] wrote to M[ary] W[ordsworth]: "Yesterday I dined alone with Lady B. - and we read Lord Byron's new poem whch is not destitute of merit; though ill-planned, and often unpleasing in the sentiments, and almost always perplexed in the construction."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Beaumont      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : Lara

'Writing to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] on 19 Aug. 1814, W[ordsworth] describes an incident in a Perth bookshop: "I stepped yesterday evening into a Bookseller's shop with a sneaking hope that I might hear something about the Excursion ... on the contrary, inquiry of the Bookseller what a poetical parcel he was then opening consisted of, he said that it was a new Poem, called Lara ... supposed to be written by Lord Byron ... I took the book in my hand, and saw Jacqueline in the same column with Lara ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Samuel Rogers : Jacqueline

'Writing to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] on 19 Aug. 1814, W[ordsworth] describes an incident in a Perth bookshop: "I stepped yesterday evening into a Bookseller's shop with a sneaking hope that I might hear something about the Excursion ... on the contrary, inquiry of the Bookseller what a poetical parcel he was then opening consisted of, he said that it was a new Poem, called Lara ... supposed to be written by Lord Byron ... I took the book in my hand, and saw Jacqueline in the same column with Lara ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Exile of Erin, The

' ... the first three stanzas and two concluding stanzas of [Thoms] Campbell's poem [The Exile of Erin] were copied and pasted by S[ara] H[utchinson] into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      

  

George Carleton : Memoirs of Captain George Carleton, The

'C[oleridge] read ... [George Carleton, Memoirs] in April [1809] ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Gabriello Chiabrera : Delle Opere di Gabriello Chiabrera

'W[ordsworth] translated ten epitaphs from Chiabrera's Opere ... probably ...between 26 Oct. and 4 Nov. 1809.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Clanvowe : Of the Cuckowe and the Nightingale

'W[ordsworth] seems to have translated ... [John Clanvowe, Of the Cuckowe and the Nightingale] on 7 and 8 Dec. 1801, and made a fair copy on 9 Dec.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Thomas Clarkson : History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, The

'C[oleridge] read vol. 1 [of Thomas Clarkson, History ... of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade] in proof in early Feb. 1808 ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: proof

  

William Cobbett : Weekly Political Register, The

'C[oleridge] consulted ... [the Weekly Political Register] while working on the Friend ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : [summary of Proceedings upon the Inquiry relative to the Armistice & Convention, &c. made and concluded in Portugal, in August 1808, between the Commanders of the British and French Armies ...]

' ... a summary of the contents of the Proceedings was published in the Courier on 3 Jan. 1809, and read by W[ordsworth].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

unknown : Proceedings upon the Inquiry relative to the Armistice & Convention, &c. made and concluded in Portugal, in August 1808, between the Commanders of the British and French Armies ...

" ... a summary of the contents of the Proceedings was published in the Courier on 3 Jan. 1809, and read by W[ordsworth]. Aware of W[ordsworth]'s interest in the Convention of Cintra, [Daniel] Stuart offered him a copy of the pamphlet ... De Quincey sent one to Grasmere ... where it arrived on 1 April 1809 ... W[ordsworth] had read it by 26 April ... "

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Charles Cotton : Winter

Wu notes that Charles Lamb copied stanzas 20-53 of Charles Cotton, Winter, in letter to Wordsworth of 5 March 1803.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      

  

William Cowper : On the Loss of the Royal George

'Shortly after its first appearance in Hayley's Life and Posthumous Writings of Cowper (1803), Lamb copied ... out ['On the Loss of the Royal George'] in a letter to W[ordsworth] of 5 March ... On 31 March Lamb copied the same poem into C[oleridge]'s notebook.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Print: Book

  

Samuel Daniel : Hymen's Triumph

'C[oleridge] read from Daniel, including Hymen's Triumph and Musophilus, during his stay at D[ove] C[ottage], 20 Dec. 1803-14 Jan. 1804 ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Samuel Daniel : Musophilus

'C[oleridge] read from Daniel, including Hymen's Triumph and Musophilus, during his stay at D[ove] C[ottage], 20 Dec. 1803-14 Jan. 1804 ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Sneyd Davies : Against Indolence. An Epistle

Wordsworth to Alexander Dyce, 22 June 1830, on 'exceedingly pleasing' poem by Sneyd Davies: 'It begins "There was a time my dear Cornwallis, when" I first met with it in Dr Enfield's Exercises of Elocution or Speaker, I forget which.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Enfield : Speaker, The

Wordsworth to Alexander Dyce, 22 June 1830, on 'exceedingly pleasing' poem by Sneyd Davies: 'It begins "There was a time my dear Cornwallis, when" I first met with it in Dr Enfield's Exercises of Elocution or Speaker, I forget which.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Daniel Defoe : Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, written by himself

'... in 1811 S[ara] H[utchinson] mentioned that Herbert Southey "can read Robinson Crusoe or any Book".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Herbert Southey      Print: Book

  

Daniel Defoe : Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, written by himself

'in 1804 [Robert] Southey noted that Hartley Coleridge "never has read, nor will read, beyond Robinson's departure from the island."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hartley Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Rene Descartes : unknown

'W[ordsworth copied quotations from Descartes into D[ove] C[ottage] MS 31, leaves 71-2, c. Feb 1801.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Kenelm Digby : Two Treatises, in the one of which, the nature of bodies; in the other, the nature of mans soule; is looked into: in way of discovery of the immortality of reasonable bodies

'Notebooks i 1002, 1004 and 1005 reveal that, 1-9 Nov. 1801, C[oleridge] was reading a copy of Digby's Two Treatises (1645) borrowed from Carlisle Cathedral Library.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Michael Drayton : Elegy to my dearly loved Friend, Henry Reynolds, Esq. of Poets and Poesy

'On the recto of a fragment of W[ordsworth]'s Prospectus to The Recluse [Dove Cottage MS 24], there appear the following lines: "That noble Chaucer, in those former times, That first enrich'd our English with his rhimes, And was the first of ours that ever brake Into the Muses' treasure, and first spake In weighty numbr, devlving in the mine Of perfect knowledge."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Guillaume de Saluste Dubartas : Dubartas his Second Weeke: Babylon. The Second Part of the Second Day of the II. Weeke

'C[oleridge]was ... reading ... [Dubartas his Second Weeke] in 1807.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Guillaume de Saluste Dubartas : Dubartas his Second Weeke: Babylon. The Second Part of the Second Day of the II. Weeke

'Southey had certainly read Dubartas by 2 March 1815 ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Print: Book

  

Maria Edgeworth : unknown

'On 30 May 1812 W[ordsworth] observed [regarding Maria Edgeworth] that "I had read but few of her works" ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

unknown : epitaph of Josias Franklin and wife

'D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied a number of epitaphs into [Dove Cottage MS 20] between late April and 17 Dec. 1799, namely: epitaph of Josias Franklin and his wife; Benjamin Franklin's epitaph; and an "Epitaph taken from the Parish Church-Yard of Marsk in the County of York".'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

unknown : epitaph of Benjamin Franklin

'D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied a number of epitaphs into [Dove Cottage MS 20] between late April and 17 Dec. 1799, namely: epitaph of Josias Franklin and his wife; Benjamin Franklin's epitaph; and an "Epitaph taken from the Parish Church-Yard of Marsk in the County of York".'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

unknown : epitaph "taken from the Parish Church-Yard of Marsk in the County of York"

'D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied a number of epitaphs into [Dove Cottage MS 20] between late April and 17 Dec. 1799, namely: epitaph of Josias Franklin and his wife; Benjamin Franklin's epitaph; and an "Epitaph taken from the Parish Church-Yard of Marsk in the County of York".'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

 : Gazette, The

De Quincey to Southey, 31 May 1811: 'We received the Gazette last night, and were a little disappointed by it,: Wordsworth indeed was greatly mortified ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

William Godwin : Lives of Edward and John Philips, Nephews and Pupils of Milton

Mary Lamb to Mrs Morgan and Charlotte Brant, 22 May 1815: 'Godwin has just published a new book ... Wordsworth has just now looked into it and found these words "All modern poetry is nothing but the old, genuine poetry , new [vam]ped, and delivered to us at second, or twentieth hand." In great wrath he took a pencil and wrote in the margin "That is false, William Godwin. Signed William Wordsworth."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

unknown : Tale Imitated from Gower

'Prelude MS W contains a fair copy of a verse translation of the tale of the travellers and the angel from Gower's Confessio Amantis ii 291-364 in D[orothy] W[ordsworth]'s hand, entitled "Tale Imitated from Gower - Friend and Contemporary of Chaucer" ... It was not apparently copied from a printed source.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

James Grahame : Sabbath, The

'On 7 Aug. 1805 the Wordsworths told Lady Beaumont that "We have just read a poem called the Sabbath written by a very good man in a truly christian spirit ... "'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

James Grahame : Birds of Scotland

'W[ordsworth] copied out seven lines of Grahame's poem [Birds of Scotland] in a letter to Lady Beaumont of Dec. 1806, written at Coleorton, commending it as "exquisite".'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Fulke Greville : Treatie of Human Learning, A

'C[oleridge] read Greville's A Treatie of Human Learning ... in March 1810 at Allan Bank.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Fulke Greville : Inquisition upon Fame and Honour, An

'C[oleridge] read Greville's An Inquisition upon Fame and Honour... in March 1810 at Allan Bank.'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Fulke Greville : Treatie on Warres, A

'C[oleridge] read Greville's ... A Treatie of Warres ... in March 1810 at Allan Bank.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Fulke Greville : Alaham

'C[oleridge] read Greville's ... Alaham in March 1810 at Allan Bank.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jeanne Marie Bouvieres de la Motte Guyon : Life of Lady Guion, The

'[Mark L.] Reed judges that W[ordsworth] and D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied extracts from the Life [of Lady Guion] into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... by 29 Sept 1800.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Book

  

George Herbert : [poems]

'C[oleridge] was reading Herbert in July-Sept 1809 ... during his residence at Allan Bank ... He was apparently reading his copy of The Temple ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Herbert : Temple, The

'C[oleridge] was reading Herbert in ... Mar. 1810, during his residence at Allan Bank ... He was apparently reading his copy of The Temple ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Heron : Observations Made in a Journey through the Western Counties of Scotland

'[Mark L.] Reed judges that a passage on pedlars from Heron was entered in the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... by 5 April 1800 ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Book

  

Lucy Hutchinson : Memoirs of the Life of Colonel Hutchinson, Governor of Nottingham Castle and Town

'On 29 Dec. 1806 Southey asked John May: "Have you seen the 'Memoirs of Colonel Hutchinson'? Very, very rarely has any book so greatly delighted me."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Print: Book

  

Francis Jeffrey : review of Thalaba

'[Wordsworth's] first mention of ... [Francis Jeffrey, review of Robert Southey, Thalaba, in the Edinburgh Review 1 (Oct 1802)] comes in a letter of Jan. 1804 to [John] Thelwall ... "That review of Thalaba I never read entirely, having only seen it in a Country Bookseller's shop, who would not permit me to cut open the Leaves, as he only had it upon trial."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Mary Anne Lamb : Dialogue Between a Mother and Child

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, Dialogue Between a Mother and Child] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mary Anne Lamb : Lady Blanch, regardless of her lovers' fears

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, The Lady Blanch, regardless of her lovers' fears] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mary Anne Lamb : Virgin and Child

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, "Virgin and Child"] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mary Anne Lamb : On the Same (Virgin and Child)

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, "On the Same" ("Virgin and Child")] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Walter Savage Landor : Simoneida

Wordsworth to Walter Savage Landor, 20 April 1822: 'In your Simoneida, which I saw some years ago at Mr Southey's, I was pleased to find rather an out-of-the-way image, in which the present hour is compared to the shade on the dial.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Harriet Lee : German's Tale, The

'De Quincey recalled the time ... when he persuaded W[ordsworth] to read [Harriet] Lee's The German's Tale: 'This most splendid tale I put into the hands of Wordsworth; and, for once, having, I suppose, nothing else to read, he condescended to run through it. I shall not report his opinion, which, in fact, was no opinion ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Alain Rene Le Sage : Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, The

'On 19 Aug. 1810, D[orothy] W[ordsworth] told W[ordsworth] that she was "reading Malkin's Gil Blas - and it is a beautiful Book as to printing etc but I think the Translation vulgar."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

M. G. Lewis : Felon, The

'In a letter to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] of 10 March 1801, J[ohn] W[ordsworth] added that "Mr Lewis's poem [The Felon] is the most funny one I ever read ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

 : [newspapers]

Wordsworth to Hazlitt, 5 March 1804: "I was sorry to see from the Papers that your Friend poor Fawcett was dead; not so much that he was dead but to think of the manner in which he had sent himself off before his time.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Newspaper

  

Willam Blake : [lyrics]

'W[ordsworth] and M[ary] W[ordsworth] copied four Blake lyrics from Malkin's volume into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... some time between mid-March and 10 June 1807.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Willam Blake : [lyrics]

'W[ordsworth] and M[ary] W[ordsworth] copied four Blake lyrics from Malkin's volume into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... some time between mid-March and 10 June 1807.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Malory : Morte D'Arthur

Wu notes translated extract from Sir Bors' lament for Arthur (in the Morte D'Arthur of Thomas Malory) in the Wordsworth Commonplace Book.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Robert Malthus : Essay on the Principle of Population, An

'C[oleridge] had read the Essay [on the Principle of Population] shortly after its first appearance in 1798.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Martin Martin : Description of the Western Islands of Scotland, A

'In late 1808 S[ara] H[utchinson] copied the description of the gawlin from [Martin] Martin, pp.71-2, into C[oleridge]'s notebook ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Print: Book

  

Andrew Marvell : On a Drop of Dew

'C[oleridge]'s letter to S[ara] H[utchinson] of May 1807 contained a transcription of Marvell's "On a Drop of Dew".'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Andrew Marvell : Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland, An

'Prelude MS W [Dove Cottage MS 38)] contains a transcription of Marvell's Horatian Ode dating from late 1802.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Wiliam Gifford : Introduction to The Plays of Philip Massinger

'C[oleridge] read Gifford's introduction and Ferriar's essay on Massinger in Dec. 1808-09.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Ferriar : [essay]

'C[oleridge] read Gifford's introduction and Ferriar's essay on Massinger in Dec. 1808-09.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Michaelangelo  : [sonnets]

'W[ordsworth] was reading Michaelangelo's sonnets with a view to translating them from Dec 1804; his work on them proceeded ... throughout 1805-06, and apparentlly less intensively in 1807.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

John Milton : [sonnets]

Wordsworth in the Fenwick Note to Miscellaneous Sonnets: 'In the cottage of Town-End, one afternoon, in 1801, my Sister read to me the Sonnets of Milton. I had long been well acquainted with them, but I was particularly struck on that occasion with the dignified simplicity and majestic harmony that runs through most of them ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'During his stay with the Beaumonts at Coleorton, 30 Oct. to 2 Nov. 1806, W[ordsworth] gave several readings from Paradise Lost - including Book I and Book VI, lines 767-84. Beaumont wrote to W[ordsworth] on 6 Nov., recalling "that sublime passage in Milton you read the other night ... where he describes ... the Messiah's ... coming as shining afar off ..."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu : Letters

'"In reading Lady Mary W Montagu's letters, whi[ch] we have had lately, I continually felt a want - I had not the least affection for her" D[orothy] W[ordsworth] to Lady Beaumont, 11 April 1805).'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

anon : Eclectic Review

Recorded in Joseph Farington's diary, '[On 21 May] Sir George [Beaumont] mentioned the high encomiums for Wordsworth's "Excursion" in the Eclectic Review. Wordsworth had seen it, and could not but be pleased with the sentiments expressed in it."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in Search of a Wife

'[Thomas De Quincey] got round to reading ... [Hannah More, Coelebs in Search of a Wife] only in late June or early July [1809], when "I read about 40 pages in the 1st. vol: such trash I really never did read."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in Search of a Wife

'Lamb read ... [Hannah More, Coelebs in Search of a Wife] at around ... [June-July 1809] ... on 7 June he told C[oleridge] that "it is one of the very poorest sort of common novels with the drawback of dull religion in it."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Print: Book

  

anon : [Recipe for croup medicine]

'The Wordsworths were reading the Morning Chronicle during the 1800s. It was the source of ... the recipe for croup medicine ... entered in the Commonplace Book.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: Newspaper

  

Lindley Murray : Introduction to the English Reader

'In the Fenwick Note to The Pet-lamb, W[ordsworth] recalled: "Within a few months after the publication of this poem, I was much surprised and more hurt to find it in a child's School-book which, having been compiled by Lindley Murray, had come into use at Grasmere School ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Charles Lyell : Principles of Geology

'In his isolated rural community Gregory never imagined that he might aspire to a higher profession. Now he returned to his old school for evening classes in chemistry, arithmetic, and mining engineering, where he won a prize book of world history and was introduced to Lyell's Principles of Geology. These two volumes taught him to think in evolutionary terms, and he began to read widely on the historicity of religion and the development of capitalism'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

 : [book of world history]

'In his isolated rural community Gregory never imagined that he might aspire to a higher profession. Now he returned to his old school for evening classes in chemistry, arithmetic, and mining engineering, where he won a prize book of world history and was introduced to Lyell's Principles of Geology. These two volumes taught him to think in evolutionary terms, and he began to read widely on the historicity of religion and the development of capitalism'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

 : [weekly paper]

'[Chester Armstrong's] political consciousness was awakened when his father, a self-help Radical, read aloud the weekly paper, which brought home the horrors of the Afghan and Zulu wars'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Newspaper

  

Daniel Defoe : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

James Fenimore Cooper : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Charles Dickens : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Jules Verne : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Robert Burns : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Percy Bysshe Shelley : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

John Keats : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Alfred Lord Tennyson : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

George Gordon, Lord Byron : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

William Wordsworth : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Robert Browning : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Charles Darwin : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Thomas Henry Huxley : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

 : British Weekly

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Emile Zola : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Henrik Johan Ibsen : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Oscar Wilde : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

George Bernard Shaw : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Herbert George Wells : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Arnold Bennett : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

 : [Marxist Economics]

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Aldous Huxley : Brave New World

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Alfred Lord Tennyson : 'Break, break, break'

'[Through the Women's Co-operative Guild, Deborah Smith] began reading poetry and, at age fifty one, discovered her own spiritual longings in Tennyson: Break, break, break on thy cold grey stones, oh sea, Oh would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Deborah Smith      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : Pamela

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora THompson      Print: Book

  

Walter Scott : Waverley Novels

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora THompson      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Gaskell : Cranford

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : 

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

George Gordon Lord Byron : Don Juan

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

Jane Austen : 

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

Charles Dickens : 

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

Anthony Trollope : 

[According to Flora Thompson], "Modern writers who speak of the booklessness of the poor at that time must mean books as possessions...there were always books to borrow"... One could borrow Pamela and the Waverley novels from a neighbour, Christies Old Organ from the Sunday School library. Her uncle, a shoemaker, had once carted home from a country-house auction a large collection of books that no-one would buy: novels, poetry, sermons, histories, dictionaries. She read him Cranford while he worked in his shop... Later she could borrow from her employer (the village postmistress) Shakespeare and Byron's Don Juan, as well as Jane Austen, Dickens and Trollope from the Mechanics' Institute library.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

Lewis Carroll : Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

[Alice Foley's illiterate mother objected to silent reading but responded well to Alice's reading of Alice in Wonderland]: "To my surprise, mother entered quite briskly into the activities of the rabbit hole. From that time onwards, I became mother's official reader and almost every day when I returned from school she would say coaxingly, 'Let's have a chapthur'."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Arthur Conan Doyle : 

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

 : The Family Reader

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[n/a] : The Daily Chronicle

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Newspaper

  

 : Lloyd's Weekly News

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Newspaper

  

Jules Verne : Journey to the Centre of the Earth

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Burton      Print: Book

  

 : Chips

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: family of Harry Burton     Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

 : The Butterfly

'[the father of Harry Burton] 'an irregularly employed housepainter, liked a "stirring novel" but nothing more challenging than Conan Doyle: "He had no use whatever for anything remotely approaching the spiritual in art, literature or music...", and yet the whole family rea and, on some level, took pleasure in sharing and discussing their reading. His mother recited serials from the Family Reader and analyzed them at length with grandma over a cup of tea. Every few minutes his father would offer up a snippet from the Daily Chronicle or Lloyd's Weekly News. The children were not discouraged from reading aloud, perhaps from Jules Verne: "I can smell to this day the Journey to the Centre of the Earth", Burton recalled. The whole family made use of the public library and enjoyed together children's magazines like Chips and The Butterfly'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: family of Harry Burton     Print: Serial / periodical

  

 : Cinderella

'As a boy, the poet John Clare consumed six-penny romances of Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk, "and great was the pleasure, pain or surprise increased by allowing them authenticity, for I firmly believed every page I read and considered I possessed in these the chief learning and literature of the country".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

 : Jack and the Beanstalk

'As a boy, the poet John Clare consumed six-penny romances of Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk, "and great was the pleasure, pain or surprise increased by allowing them authenticity, for I firmly believed every page I read and considered I possessed in these the chief learning and literature of the country".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

David Moir : The Life of Mansie Wauch

'A joiner's son in an early-nineteenth century Scottish village recalled [reading] his first novel, David Moir's The Life of Mansie Wauch (1828): "I literally devoured it... A new world seemed to dawn upon me, and Mansie and the other characters in the book have always been historical characters with me, just as real as Caius Julius Caesar, Oliver Cromwell or Napoleon Bonaparte... So innocent, so unsophisticated - I may as well say, so green - was I, that I believed every word it contained".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: a Scottish joiner's son      Print: Book

  

 : [the story of Joseph]

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

 : Jack the Giant Killer

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

 : Sinbad the Sailor

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

 : Beauty and the Beast

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

 : Aladdin

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

Homer  : the Iliad

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

Homer  : The Odyssey

'As a boy, stonemason Hugh Miller first learned to appreciate the pleasures of literature in the "most delightful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements". Once Miller had learned to read Scripture as a story, he soon found similar and equally gripping tales in chapbooks of Jack the Giant Killer, Sinbad the Sailor, Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin. And then, he recalled, from fairy tales "I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others": Pope's Iliad and Odyssey. "With what power, and at how early an age, true genius impresses!"'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

John Bunyan : Pilgrim's Progress

'"I next succeeded in discovering for myself a child's book, of not less interest than even The Iliad." It was Pilgrim's Progress, with wonderful woodcut illustrations. And from there it was a sort step to Robinson Crusoe and Gulliver's Travels'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

Daniel Defoe : Robinson Crusoe

'"I next succeeded in discovering for myself a child's book, of not less interest than even The Iliad." It was Pilgrim's Progress, with wonderful woodcut illustrations. And from there it was a sort step to Robinson Crusoe and Gulliver's Travels'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

Jonathan Swift : Gulliver's Travels

'"I next succeeded in discovering for myself a child's book, of not less interest than even The Iliad." It was Pilgrim's Progress, with wonderful woodcut illustrations. And from there it was a sort step to Robinson Crusoe and Gulliver's Travels'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hugh Miller      Print: Book

  

Petrarch : De Vita Solitaria

' ... C[oleridge] was reading ... [Petrarch, De Vita Solitaria] on arrival at Allan Bank in Sept. 1808 ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Ambrose Philips : Collection of Old Ballads, A

'D[orothy] W[ordsworth] made copies of extracts or complete texts from Philips' Collection in the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... some time between 10 July 1807 and c.5 June 1808. The ballads were: Eighth Henry Ruling in this land; A Princely Song of the Six Queens that were married to Henry the 8th; Fitte of the Ballad of Lady Jane Grey and Lord Guilford Dudley; The Lady Arabella and Lord Seymour; The Suffolk Miracle; and the Lamentable Complaint of Queen Mary for the Unkind Departure of King Philip.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Pindar : Carmina

'C[oleridge]'s study of Pindar in Oct. 1806, apparently begun in London and completed in Bury St Edmunds, was dependent upon the copy of Schmied's edition (Wittenberg, 1616) now in the Wisbech Museum and Literary Institute ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Plato : Unknown

'... C[oleridge]was reading Plato during the mid-1790s ... '

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Plato : Parmenides

'[during winter 1801] C[oleridge] read Parmenides and Timaeus "with great care" ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Plato : Timaeus

'[during winter 1801] C[oleridge] read Parmenides and Timaeus "with great care" ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Sir Joshua Reynolds : The Works of Sir Joshua Reynolds

"On 20 July 1804 W[ordsworth] wrote to Sir George Beaumont: "'A few days ago I received from Mr Southey your very acceptable present of Sir Joshua Reynolds works, which with the life I have nearly read through. Several of the discourses I had read before though never regularly together: they have very much added to the high opinion which I before entertained of Sir Joshua Reynolds.' "W[ordsworth's first comprehensive reading of Reynolds' works can be dated to four or five days in the middle of July 1804."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Sir Joshua Reynolds : Discourses

"On 20 July 1804 W[ordsworth] wrote to Sir George Beaumont: "'A few days ago I received from Mr Southey your very acceptable present of Sir Joshua Reynolds works, which with the life I have nearly read through. Several of the discourses I had read before though never regularly together: they have very much added to the high opinion which I before entertained of Sir Joshua Reynolds.' "W[ordsworth]'s first comprehensive reading of Reynolds' works can be dated to four or five days in the middle of July 1804. He had, of course, referred to the Discourses in the 1798 Advertisement to Lyrical Ballads."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : The Correspondence of Samuel Richardson, a selection from the original manuscripts

"On 5 Jan 1806 D[orothy] W[ordsworth] told Lady Beaumont; "'My Brother chanced to meet with Richardson's letters at a Friend's house, and glancing over them, read those written by Mrs Klopstock, he was exceedingly affected by them and said it was impossible to read them without loving the woman.'"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Samuel Richardson : The Correspondence of Samuel Richardson, a selection from the original manuscripts

'Robert Southey on "The Correspondence of Samuel Richardson" in letter to C. W. Williams Wynn, 27 November 1804: "Richardson's correspondence I should think worse than anything of any celebrity that ever was published ... The few letters of Klopstock's Wife must be excepted from this censure: they are ... very affecting; indeed the notice of her death, coming ... after that sweet letter in which she dwells upon her hopes of happiness from that child whose birth destroyed her, came upon me like an electric shock."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Print: Book

  

William Roscoe : The Life and Pontificate of Leo the Tenth

'On 29 Nov. 1805, D[orothy] W[ordsworth] told Lady Beaumont: "I am reading Rosco's Leo the tenth - I have only got through the first Chapter which I find exceedingly interesting. The whole Book can scarcely be so interesting to me."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Roscoe : The Life and Pontificate of Leo the Tenth

' ... by 11 Jan. 1806 ... [Southey] was reading ... [Roscoe, "Life and Pontificate of Leo the Tenth"] a second time [having read it to review it in 1805]: "I am come to Roscoe," he told Henry Herbert Southey, "whose book rises much in my estimation upon a second perusal."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Print: Book

  

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller : The Death of Wallenstein

'On 16 March 1840 W[ordsworth] told [Henry Crabb] Robinson that "C[oleridge]. translated the 2nd part of Wallenstein under my roof at Grasmere from MSS ..."'

Unknown
Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Walter Scott : Lady of the Lake, The

'C[oleridge] was a reader of ... [The Lady of the Lake]: he read Southey's copy in Sept. 1810 ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Daniel Sennertus : unknown

'[Mark L.] Reed reports that W[ordsworth] copied quotations from Sennertus into D[ove] C[ottage] MS 31 ... c.Feb.1801. They appear to have been copied from C[oleridge]'s transcriptions ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

William Sotheby : I knew a gentle maid

'On 6 Feb. 1827 W[ordsworth] told Sotheby: "I was gratified the other day by meeting in Mr Alaric Watt's Souvenir with a very old acquaintance, a Sonnet of yours, whch I had read with no little pleasure more than 30 years ago. "I knew a gentle Maid".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

William Sotheby : I knew a gentle maid

'On 6 Feb. 1827 W[ordsworth] told Sotheby: "I was gratified the other day by meeting in Mr Alaric Watt's Souvenir with a very old acquaintance, a Sonnet of yours, whch I had read with no little pleasure more than 30 years ago. "I knew a gentle Maid".'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Alaric Watts : Souvenir

'On 6 Feb. 1827 W[ordsworth] told Sotheby: "I was gratified the other day by meeting in Mr Alaric Watt's Souvenir with a very old acquaintance, a Sonnet of yours, whch I had read with no little pleasure more than 30 years ago. "I knew a gentle Maid".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William Sotheby : Saul, a Poem

'On 18 April 1807, C[oleridge] told Sotheby: "I read yesterday in a large company, where W. Wordsworth was present, about 150 lines of your Saul, respecting your country, Nelson, & the admirable transition to the main subject, which follows it - and it was delightful to me, to observe that the enthusiasm which had given animation & depth to my own tones, manifested itself with at least equal strength in the faces & voices of all the auditors."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Robert Southey : Madoc

' ... James Losh reported in his diary for 4 Sept 1800 that Madoc "is ready for publication ... Southey showed me about two years ago two books of this poem which I admired but thought deficient in dignity of sentiment and style."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Losh      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Robert Southey : History of Brazil

'In early Oct. 1810 C[oleridge] wrote to W[ordsworth]: "I send the Brazil which has entertained & instructed me."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Joshua Sylvester : O Holy Peace

Entered by Coleridge in Wordsworth Commonplace Book: 'O holy peace by thee are only found The passing joys that every where abound Sylvester'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Jeremy Taylor : Dissuasive from Popery to the People of Ireland, A

'On 13 May 1812 [Henry Crabb] Robinson recorded in his diary: "William Wordsworth was more afraid of the liberal than the methodistic party on the bench of bishops, and read a beautiful passage from Jeremy Taylor on the progress of religious dissensions from his Dissuasive against Popery."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

anon : Courier

'Writing to Mary Monkhouse from Allan Bank on 19 April 1809, S[ara] H[utchinson] remarked that she had seen a churn "advertized in the Courier yesterday". She refers to the advertisement on the front page of the Courier for 13 April [which also appeared on 5 April] ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Print: Advertisement, NewspaperManuscript: Unknown

  

Constantin Francois de Chasseboeuf comte de Volney : Travels through Syria and Egypt, in the years 1783, 1784, and 1785

Wu notes extracts from vol 1 of Volney, "Travels Through Syria and Egypt", in Dove Cottage MS 28.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Kirke White : To the Herb Rosemary

Duncan Wu identifies poem transcribed in Wordsworth Commonplace Book and opening 'Sweet scented flow'r! who'rt wont to bloom / On January's front severe ... ' as Henry Kirke White, "To the herb Rosemary".

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Kirke White : ["literary remains"]

Southey describes arrival of 'literary remains' of Henry Kirke White at Greta Hall in his preface to The Remains of Kirke White, of Nottingham (2 vols, 1807): 'Mr. Coleridge was present when I opened them, and was, as well as myself, equally affected and astonished at the proofs of industry which they displayed ... There were papers upon law, upon electricity, upon chemistry, upon the Latin and Greek languages ... upon history, chronology, divinity, the fathers, &c ... His poems were numerous.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Kirke White : ["literary remains"]

Southey describes arrival of "literary remains" of Henry Kirke White at Greta Hall in his preface to The Remains of Kirke White, of Nottingham (2 vols, 1807): 'Mr. Coleridge was present when I opened them, and was, as well as myself, equally affected and astonished at the proofs of industry which they displayed ... There were papers upon law, upon electricity, upon chemistry, upon the Latin and Greek languages ... upon history, chronology, divinity, the fathers, &c ... His poems were numerous.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Wilkinson : [poems]

'Two poems in [Thomas] Wilkinson's hand, "I Love to be Alone" and "Lines Written on a Paper Wrapt round a Moss-rose Pulled on New-years Day, and sent to M. Wilson," copied onto a duodecimo double sheet, have been pasted into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

Thomas Wilkinson : Lamentation on the Untimely Death of Roger, in the Cumberland Dialect, A

'... ["A Lamentation on the Untimely Death of Roger, in the Cumberland Dialect"], by [Thomas] Wilkinson, in his own hand, was pasted into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... after 19 Jan. 1801, the date of W[ordsworth]'s first known meeting with Wilkinson.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

Thomas Wilkinson : Tours to the British Mountains

'W[ordsworth] copied from ... [Thomas Wilkinson's MS "Tours of the British Mountains"] the passage which had inspired the Solitary Reaper [about a female reaper singing in Erse], alongside another related to The Excursion, into his Commonplace Book [Dove Cottage MS 26, ie "Wordsworth Commonplace Book"] ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Wilkinson : To My Thrushes, Blackbirds, etc.

'On 7 July 1809, W[ordsworth] told Thomas Wilkinson that "Mr Coleridge showed me a little poem of yours upon your Birds which gave us all very great pleasure."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

John Wilson : [MS poems]

'On 13 May 1812, [Henry Crabb] Robinson asked W[ordsworth] about [John] Wilson's recently-published volume, The Isle of Palms: "He said he had seen only a few". W[ordsworth] added that "Wilson's poems are an attenuation of mine ... "... his letter to M[ary] W[ordsworth] of 23 May ... mentions one of Wilson's poems; "which we had in Mss., to the sleeping Child and which is but an Attenuation of my ode to the Highland Girl."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

William Withering : Arrangement of British Plants according to the latest Imrovements of the Linnean System and an