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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

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Listings for Author:  

Henry M Wallis

 

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Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Meredith's works]

'Geo Meredith's Diana of the Crossways was the subject of the evening. H.M. Wallis read an essay on the work of Geo Meredith as a whole & also two pieces of his poetry. This gave rise to considerable discussion. W.J. Rowntree gave a resume of Diana of the Crossways illustrated by copious extracts from the book & other members also read from the book & his poems'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on English ballads]

'The subject of the evening - 'English Ballads' - was then discussed in two papers, by F.J. Edminson & H.M. Wallis, and illustrated by readings recitations & songs. Recitations were given by Rosamund Wallis & Mrs Ridges. Readings by H.M. Wallis, Mrs Smith & Mrs Edminson'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Thomas Hardy]

'The programme on Thos Hardy & his works was as follows Mr Binns read an interesting account of the author's life & H.M. Wallis one on the minor poems. F.E. Reynolds read selections from Tess & S.A. Reynolds from Under the Greenwood Tree'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on parodies]

'The programme on parodies consisted of a paper by H.M. Wallis & C.I. Evans & readings by Miss Marriage, Mrs Evans, C.I. Evans, W. Binns, H.M. Wallis & Helen Rawlings'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: H.M. Wallis and Charles Evans     Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on historical setting of Browning's 'Sordello']

'Browning's Sordello was introduced by some prefatory notes by H.M. Wallis read by E.E. Unwin. H.M. Wallis then read a paper describing the historical setting of the poem. Selections were read by Miss Marriage and C.I. Evans'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [prefatory notes to Browning's 'Sordello']

'Browning's Sordello was introduced by some prefatory notes by H.M. Wallis read by E.E. Unwin. H.M. Wallis then read a paper describing the historical setting of the poem. Selections were read by Miss Marriage and C.I. Evans'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ernest E. Unwin      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [Paper on A.R. Wallace's scientific writings]

'The Meeting then considered the Life & Works of Alfred Russel Wallace. Walter S. Rowntree gave us an account of Wallace's life from the autobiography reading a number of well chosen extracts. This was followed by a paper from Henry M. Wallis on his scientific work and one from Mrs Smith on his psychical work.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Meredith]

'The evening was devoted to Meredith. H.M. Wallis read a most interesting paper upon Meredith's works. This gave rise to considerable discussion. Mrs Evans read from Richard Feverel. Mrs Robson - The Egoist. C.E. Stansfield introduced us to the poems of Meredith. The evening closed with the reading of [Jerry in another hand] the Juggler by C.I. Evans. This poem came as a pleasant surprise after the more obscure & difficult poems to which we had been introduced & should certainly encorage some of us to dig deeper into his poetical works.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Gilbert Murray]

'Gilbert Murray & his work was the subject for the evening & a paper was read by H.M. Wallis. This afforded an interesting & useful introduction to the evening's subject & it was followed by several readings from his work. Mrs Rawlings read from 'The Rise of the Greek Epic' & H.M. Wallis later also read from the same book. Miss Marriage also read some extracts from one of his volumes of translations'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Wells's 'Romances']

'The meeting then considered the work of H.G. Wells. The chief item of interest was undoubtedly a paper by Henry M. Wallis upon Wells's romances but a better title would be 'A Critique of the Wells Method in Story-writing'. This was certainly one of the ablest papers which H.M.W. has contributed to the Book Club in recent years and gave rise to interesting discussion. R.H. Robson read one of the short stories to illustrate this side of Wells's literary works. Mrs Smith read a paper upon Mankind in the Making and Mary Hayward dealt with the novels, showing by extracts his views upon the English middle class, marriage, social life & religion.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on an altar stone found near Carthage]

'Essays were then read. The Secretary does not feel able to do more than indicate the general nature of these essays. 1. Read by R.H. Robson. An essay written by H.M.W. about the remains of an altar stone found near Carthage. Vivid & interesting, bloodstained though the stone was, with human sacrifice. 2. Mrs Smith read a very interesting paper dealing with the mind & its training. 'My mind to me a kingdom is'. Considerable discussion followed. 3. Mr Stansfield read a fantasia (written surely by a historian. R.H.R.) relating the musings of Mendax II giving expression to a cynical prophecy of European politics if events evolved or devolved along present lines. We hope that the assassination of Ld. George by a Quaker pacifist & the suppression of L.P.S. will not be fulfilled. 4. E.E. Unwin read a paper entitled 'The Humours of Man' which consisted of a number of humorous stories lightly linked together'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Reginald Robson      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper introducing Balzac]

'Balzac We were introduced by Henry M. Wallis to the novels of Balzac by an introduction to & readings from The Wild Asses Skin. A general discussion on the novel & the author followed and Mrs Unwin read some extracts from an article upon Balzac published some few years ago in 'Everyman'. [these extracts, summarising Balzac's career are quoted at length] Mrs Robson read from 'Le Pere Goriot' 'Old Goriot' Rosamund Wallis read 'Christ in Flanders' with its fine description of a ferryboat in a storm & the mysterious stranger who lead [sic] those who had faith walking over the waters to safety when the boat capsized'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [essay on Keats]

'The subject of the evening's programme was John Keats. R.H. Robson read an essay dealing with his life. The main influences & friendships of his short life were well brought out. H.M. Wallis folowed with an appreciation written in the delightful style of which our Friend is so great a master & a reading of the Grecian Urn ode by Miss Marriage completed the first part of the programme. On our return from physical refreshment Charles I. Evans described the Poems of 1820 and some readings were given by Mrs Evans, Mrs Robson & C.E. Stansfield.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on the Comic]

'The evening then became a 'Comic One'. The chief contribution was a paper by H.M. Wallis on 'the Comic' as reflected in the works of the writers of last century. Readings were given & stories told as illustrations'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Leslie's 'The End of a Chapter']

'The main business of the evening was then proceeded with - 5 mins essays upon some book read recently. Mrs Evans read 'An English Lumber Camp' - from internal evidence it is probably true that this was an essay drawn from real life rather than from any book read. It was a magnificent literary effort in the author's best style. Perhaps more of 'H.M.W.' than 'Ashton Hillier'. Mrs Smith read a paper upon 'The Garden of Survival' a book by Alg. Blackwood. The paper gave rise to much interest. The extraordinary beauty of the extracts read from the book and the insight into the spiritual meaning of 'Guidance' displayed by the author impressed us all. Ernest E. Unwin read a paper on 'The End of a Chapter' by Shane Leslie - this paper was written by H.M. Wallis & introduced most of us to a new writer of power. The change in the world, in the balance of the classes & their future importance formed the theme of the book. Mary Hayward described her discovery of 'The Story of my Heart' by Richard Jefferies & read some extracts from it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ernest E. Unwin      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Hardy's life and work]

'The meeting then considered the works of Thomas Hardy. H.M. Wallis gave a paper outlining the main features of Hardy's life and gave some idea of the succession of works and a general criticism of his writing. The announced programme for the evening then came to an abrupt end - for health kept Mr Evans away & Mr Stansfield also was unable to come, and these two members had arranged to introduce the novels & poems of Hardy & also to start a discussion upon Hardy's religious views. We were very sorry to miss our friends & their contribution & hope that we may have another evening upon Hardy at some future time. To fill this gap in our programme H.M. Wallis told in his graphic way the short story called The 3 Travellers & Rosamund Wallis read the wife auction scene from 'The Mayor of Casterbridge' & the Secretary read a critique by Lawrence Binyon on the poems of Hardy'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Browning's The Ring & the Book]

'the rest of the evening was devoted to Browning's The Ring & the Book. Henry M. Wallis read a masterly paper in introduction. This enabled those who had not read the long poem to understand the story & the way in which Browning treated the story. The success of the evening was largely due to this introduction. The story from several standpoints was then dealt with by members of the club. R.H. Robson read a description of the 1st Guido A. Rawlings read extracts from the book Capansacchi Mrs Evans [ditto] Pompilia Mr Gidham [ditto] Pope Mr Robson [ditto] Guido in prison'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Thomas Love Peacock]

'The subject before the meeting was Thomas Love Peacock, novelist & poet. H.M. Wallis read an introductory paper which gave us the facts of Peacock's life & a general account of his writings. Extracts from his works were read C.I. Evans The War Songs [sic] of Dinas Vawr Miss Cole Love & Age E.E. Unwin extracts from Nightmare Abbey R.B. Graham Some of the poems from his novels C.I. Evans Three men of Gotham'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on History of Berkshire]

'5. The Club now considered the subject for the evening - Berkshire - & the opening paper was by H.M. Wallis who touched upon the History of the County in his inimitable way from the Piltdown race to Archbishop Laud. Alfred & his battles. Reading & the 35 religious houses & the breweries are prominent features of the story & may be responsible for the saying Piety Spiders & Pride. 6. Rosamund Wallis read a gruesome story from Thomas of Reading about a couple of Reading inhabitants who had murdered 60 people by the simple device of a trapdoor floor to the spare bedroom & a cauldron of boiling water below. 7. 3 Berkshire folksongs were then given by Mrs Robson & E.E. Unwin. 8. S.A Reynolds read a Ballad entitled 'A Berkshire Lady', though speaking as a mere male I doubt whether her conduct would be considered quite lady-like today'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Piltdown Woman]

'The rest of the evening concerned Prehistoric Man & Woman. H.M. Wallis read a paper entitled 'The Piltdown Woman'. This was a learned & valuable paper upon the problems of prehistoric man, problems of date, of mental capacity, of relationships & of ancestry. These were dealt with in an interesting way & the paper was assisted greatly by a number of drawings giving details of the skulls & the reconstructions of facial peculiarities.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [essay on Pepys]

'The rest of the evening was spent in the company of Samuel Pepys (Peeps) The Club was much indebted to H.M. Wallis and to H.R. Smith for able essays giving an outline of Pepys' life & an estimate of his character. From H.R. Smith we were introduced to Pepys as the competent official who by keenness made himself master of his job. Readings from the diary were given by Rosamund Wallis on "The Great Fire" Mrs Robson on Mrs Pepys E.E. Unwin on "The Plague" & R.H. Robson'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on ballads]

'The subject of the evening, 'Ballads', now occupied attention. From an introductory paper prepared by Mary Hayward & from readings by Rosamund Wallis we learnt what a ballad is or was & is not. [this is summarised at length] The programme was divided into six parts dealing with the six main varieties of ballads. Some of these ballads were read & others were sung. Part 1. dealing with Magic Song The Two Musicians Mr & Mrs Unwin Reading The Demon Lover Mr Rawlings [ditto] Thomas the Rhymer Miss R Wallis Part 2. Stories of Romance Song Lord Rendel The Book Club Reading Edward Edward (Binnorie) R.B Graham Instead of Binnorie we were favoured by a rendering of a Berkshire version of this story by Mr Graham. In fact he broke forth into song & was assisted in the chorus refrain by the whole Club who sang with differing emphasis "And I'll be true to my love - if my love'll be true to me". part 3. Romance Shading into History reading Sir Patrick Spens Mr R.H. Robson [ditto] Bonnie house of Airly [sic] Mr H.R. Smith Part 4. Greenwood & Robin Hood Reading Nut Brown Maid Mr & Mrs Evans [ditto] Death of Robin Hood Mr Rawlings H.M. Wallis read at this stage an interesting paper upon the subject [contents summarised] Part 5. Later History Reading Battle of Otterburn Miss Marriage [ditto] Helen of Kirconnel H.M. Wallis Part 6. Showing gradual decline Song Bailiff's Daughter of Islington Mrs Robson Reading Undaunted Mary Mrs Rawlings Song Mowing the Barley All Song The Wealthy Farmer's Son Mr & Mrs Unwin'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on Laurence Housman]

'The rest of the evening was devoted to the works of Laurence Housman. Most of the members had seen & heard Mr Housman recently so there is no need to give any personal details & H.M. Wallis's encyclopaedic summary of Housman's artistic gifts & works put us in touch with the versatility of the man. "A charming man" says H.M.W. & so say all of us tho' I'm not sure whether someone did not say "a little effeminate". It was news perhaps to some to know that "An Englishwoman's Love Letters" published some years ago anonymously were by Housman. The bill of fare was varied & we were introduced to a novel, a St Francis play, a Victorian play & the Child's Guide to Knowledge. The choice whether conscious or otherwise gave us a rather curious result for in the main it dealt with the struggles & characters of women. Mrr & Mrs Evans dealt with The Sheepfold which relates the spirited history of a woman, 'Jane Sterling'. R.B. Graham chose out of all the St Francis cycle the coming of Sister Clair into the monkish community. Miss Marriage. E.E. Unwin & Alfred Rawlings gave a part-reading of "The Queen God Bless Her" which brought into prominence the foibles of Victoria and showed her in relation to two intimates, John Brown her favourite man-servant & Beaconsfield - her favourite minister. There was but little time left for R.H. Robson to display the fun of "A Child's Guide to Knowledge".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [parody of 'We are Seven']

'C.I. Evans read Geoffrey Young's [?] poem 'Mountain Playmates' & Mary Hayward read Leslie Stephen's account of the first ascent of the Rothorn. R.B. Graham circulated snapshots illustrating this reading & his own climb of the same mountain. After supper R.B. Graham gave a general chat on Mountaineering with views. A passage by Whymper on accidents was summarised by A. Rawlings who then read Whymper's account of an extraordinary accident he himself sustained. To conclude the Secretary read a parody of Wadsworth [Wordsworth?] 'We are Seven' composed by H.m. Wallis on climbing at Arolla'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Howard R. Smith      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [essay on Trollope, with extracts from his works]

'The rest of the evening was devoted to Anthony Trollope. C.E. Stansfield read an amusing passage from Dr Thorne. H.M. Wallis gave us a full & racy sketch of Trollopes life interspersed with short extracts from his works illustrative of his love of Fox hunting & his broad grasp of the social life of English upper class & clerical life. H.R. Smith read from "The Prime Minister" & F.E. Pollard gave a short appreciation of Trollopes work from which it appeared that he was not quite in the first rank of Victorian writers, he does not attempt the greatest problems but he does quite perfectly the job he sets out to do; his pictures of life are real his, [sic] characters are not mere puppets but are all alive. R.H. Robson read from the Warden & F.E. Pollard from "the three Clerks" bringing to a conclusion a delightful evening in which many renewed old acquaintances whilst others were introduced to much that was new to them.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : Thoughts on the Construction of Cathedrals

'Various anonymous essays by members of the Club were then read with the following titles and at the conclusion of the meeting whilst the authorship of some was quickly acclaimed others proved very difficult to locate. Some thoughts on Racing attributed to R. Wallis One Generation & the next or Jobson on False Freedom C.E. Stansfield Intimations of Immortality R.H. Robson The Lady of the Marsh Mrs R.B. Graham If Christianity had Won R.B. Graham The Revolt of the Innocents Geo Burrow Thoughts on the Construction of Cathedrals H.M. Wallis Revenge or Justice C Evans Five minutes Thoughts upon present Condition H.M. Wallis A Scandalous Affair [illegible symbol]'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: members of XII Book Club     Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : Five minutes Thoughts upon present Condition

'Various anonymous essays by members of the Club were then read with the following titles and at the conclusion of the meeting whilst the authorship of some was quickly acclaimed others proved very difficult to locate. Some thoughts on Racing attributed to R. Wallis One Generation & the next or Jobson on False Freedom C.E. Stansfield Intimations of Immortality R.H. Robson The Lady of the Marsh Mrs R.B. Graham If Christianity had Won R.B. Graham The Revolt of the Innocents Geo Burrow Thoughts on the Construction of Cathedrals H.M. Wallis Revenge or Justice C Evans Five minutes Thoughts upon present Condition H.M. Wallis A Scandalous Affair [illegible symbol]'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: members of XII Book Club     Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : "The Price of his Soul"

'After refreshment Geo Burrow told us of Meinholt's [sic] book "The Amber Witch" & of witchcraft & Howard R. Smith read a story written by H.M. Wallis who was unable to be present entitled "The Price of his Soul" dealing with sin eating in Wales'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Howard R. Smith      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [paper on geology]

'C.I. Evans read a short essay on W.H. Hudsons story Green Mansions H.R. Smith followed on Rates & Taxes & Geo Burrow read a short paper of H.M. Wallis on some points in recent Geology'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Burrow      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : War Time Tree Fellings

H. M. Wallis delighted us with an account of War Time Tree fellings

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : Southern Baroque Art

'Meeting held at 70, Northcourt Avenue: 2. VI. 31 Charles E. Stansfield in the chair 1. Minutes of last approved [...] 7. The subject of the Sitwells was introduced by George Burrow who read spicy biographical extracts from Who's Who about the father Sir George Reresby, the sister Edith, and the brothers Osbert and Sacheverell. [...] Relieved by this happy if unexpected dénouement we settled ourselves in renewed confidence to listen to readings from the poetry of Edith. Alfred Rawlings read us parts of Sleeping Beauty & Celia Burrow the story of Perrine. Then for the work of Osbert and Sacheverell. H. M. Wallis gave us an amusing & tantalising paper entitled "Southern Baroque Art". This was followed by further reading from Mary Pollard, Alfred Rawlings, Charles Stansfield, & George Burrow.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [an account of two or three bird nesting exploits undertaken with James Crosfield in Scotland]

Meeting held at School House, Leighton Park: 16. IX. 31. Victor Alexander in the chair
'Meeting held at School House, Leighton Park: 16. IX. 31. Victor Alexander in the chair 1. Minutes of last approved. [...] 4. John L. Hawkins then read us his paper on the Natural History of the neighbourhood [...] 6. After the interval Henry Marriage Wallis gave a vivid account of two or three bird nesting exploits undertaken with James Crosfield in Scotland.' 1. Minutes of last approved.
[...] 4. John L. Hawkins then read us his paper on the Natural History of the neighbourhood [...]
6. After the interval Henry Marriage Wallis gave a vivid account of two or three bird nesting exploits undertaken with James Crosfield in Scotland.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [on the later work of Walter Scott]

Meeting held at Ashton Lodge, Kendrick Rd., 13.x.32.

Henry M. Wallis in the chair

1. Minutes of last read & approved.


[...]

5. Francis E. Pollard then gave us an account of the life of Scott, interspersed with racy anecdotes. He gave us a lively picture of Scott's romantic outlook & of his keen historical interests.

6. Alfred Rawlings, who is endeared to us among other reasons as the stormy petrel of the Club, next launched an attack upon Scott as a poet, decrying his imperfections and slovenliness.

7. Henry M. Wallis then entertained us with the later work of Scott. Speaking as one wizard of another he almost succeeed in making us believe that he had been Scott's contemporary, & under his spell we caught something of the dazzling popularity of Scott's writings throughout the whole of Europe, and in particular of the cult for the Highlands and the Highlanders which sprang into being from his pen.

8. Towards the end of the evening we heard three readings, the first from Ivanhoe by Charles Stansfield who used the supper scenne in which Friar Tuch entertains the unknown knight, the second from the Heart of Midlothian by Frank Pollard in which Jeannie Deans pleads for her sister's life, & the third from Old Mortality by Rosamund Wallis describing the interrogation and torture inflicted upon the Covenanters.

All three readings held us enthralled, & all three papers aroused the maximum of discussion which a benevolent Chairman and a lenient hostess could allow. The time sped on beyond our usual hours, and as we took our leave we were still talking Scott.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry M. Wallis : [Of a medium, a photograph, a Twentieth Century Officer & a suit of medieval armour]

Meeting held at Fairlight, Denmark Rd.: 21.iii.33

Francis E. Pollard in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read & approved.


5. Eight anonymous essays were then read. In some of these the subject treated or the style of the author made recognition comparatively easy, but others were provocative of much ingenious speculation. A paper on English Justice proved to be the most discussed during the interval. Rival tipsters gave in confidence the names of Mrs. Stansfield & Robert Pollard as the author, one of them purporting to recognize - or coming perilously close to so doing - Mrs. Stansfield’s opinion of her fellow magistrates, while the other detected just that ingenious combination of Fascism and Bolshevism that Robert Pollard would enjoy putting up for the Club’s mystification. Further conflicting theories attributed the authorship to Henry Marriage Wallis or Howard Smith, & this last proved correct[....]


Another essay which stirred debate told of a medium, a photograph, a Twentieth Century Officer & a suit of medieval armour. It was told with that precision of detail that marks either the experienced writer of fiction or the worshipper of truth. And as if to darken counsel there was an open allusion to Bordighera. Suspicious though we were, & in spite of every appearance of our being right, we adhered to the view that the author must be H. M. Wallis.


Time & space do not allow adequate record of all the papers, but it must be mentioned that three of the eight came from the Rawlings family: a thoughtful essay by Alfred Rawlings needed a second reading if it were to be seriously discussed, some interesting reminiscences by Helen Rawlings made very good hearing, & Moroccan memories by Janet helped to make a most varied programme.

Other essays were "Safety First" by Charles E. Stansfield, and "The English - are they modest? " by Edgar Castle, both of which added some humorous touches to the evening.

A list of essayists, & their readers, follows.

Mrs Castle read a paper by Alfred Rawlings
Janet Rawlings read a paper by Helen Rawlings
Charles Stansfield read a paper by Henry M. Wallis
Reginald Robson read a paper by Howard Smith
George Burrow read a paper by Reginald Robson
Alfred Rawlings read a paper by Edgar Castle
Howard Smith read a paper by Janet Rawlings
Mrs Pollard read a paper by Charles E. Stansfield.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles E. Stansfield      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : My dear Twelve

Meeting held at Oakdene, Northcourt Av, 20.3.34.

Sylvanus A. Reynolds in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read and approved, in the teeth of one dissident.


[...]

5. We then proceeded to the anonymous essays and members felt on excellent terms with themselves at the prospect of hearing some attractive reading and of eluding or inflicting a good hoax or two.

The first essay opened discreetly without title on the theme of “Newcomers to Reading”, going on to a description of the neighbourhood, its beauties its quaint place names and historical associations. […]

6. Next came a paper on “Uniforms”. The writer was considered by one or two to show the observation of the masculine mind and the style of the feminine. […]

7. Then came a letter to "My dear Twelve" written with the unmistakeable touch of the practised writer. […]

8. We listened, too, with equal interest to a paper called “Canaries”, telling us something of the progress and perambulations of our latest migrant members. Moreover two or three of our number were able to follow their doings with particular appreciation, having mad much the same trip themselves. […]

9. All of us were a good deal non plussed by “Hors d’Oeuvres”, an essay not inappropriately named, for it contained a perplexing mixture of fare, and certainly stimulated our appetite. […]

10. Hardly less difficult was “Glastonbury”. Many of us had visited it, and so were able to follow closely the author’s points. But few of us knew enough of its history and legend to be sure whether or no our one professional historian had set his wits before us. So we gave up reasoning and just guessed. […]

11. Finally we heard “Spoonbill”. It was a noteworthy paper, combining the love of the naturalist for the birds he watches with the craft of the writer in the language he uses. […]

12. Here is the complete list. —

“Newcomers to Reading” by H. R. Smith, read by F. E. Pollard
“Uniforms” by Janet Rawlings, read by Elizabeth Alexander
“My dear Twelve” by H. M. Wallis, read by S. A. Reynolds
“Canaries” by C. E. Stansfield, read by Dorothy Brain
“Hors d’Oeuvres” by Dorothy Brain, read by R. H. Robson
“Glastonbury” by Mrs Goadby, read by H. R. Smith
“The Spoonbill” by W. Russell Brain, read by Mrs. Robson

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Sylvanus A. Reynolds      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Marriage Wallis : [a paper on witchcraft]

Meeting held at Ashton Lodge :- 3. 7. 37.

Henry Marriage Wallis in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read & approved


[...]

7. The Meeting then gave its attention to Witches.

H. M Wallis led off with a paper on Witchcraft and readings were given from the following books:- MacBeth – The Witch Scene[?] by Janet Rawlings, Dorothy Brain, & Dorothea Taylor with F. E. Pollard & V. W. Alexander as Banquo & MacBeth
Samuel – The Witch of Endor scene by Mary Robson
Westward Ho (Lucy), by Dorothy Brain
Trials for Witchcraft, by Howard Smith
Precious Bane, by Rosamund Wallis

Between all these items there was considerable discussion. Members were able to vie with one another in tale of mystery and eerie happenings, and if all the conversation was not strictly relevant at least the interest did not flag.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Marriage Wallis      Manuscript: Unknown

 

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