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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

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Listings for Reader:  

Francis E Pollard

 

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Francis E. Pollard : [on the spirit of cricket]

'Meeting held at Fairlight: 9 Denmark Rd. 18th April 1932.

Francis Pollard in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read and approved.

br/>[...]

4. F. E. Pollard then spoke on the spirit of Cricket, telling some good anecdotes to illustrate its fun and its art, both for those who play & those who frequently see it.[...]

5. Readings were then given by Victor Alexander from Nyren, by Howard Smith from Francis Thompson, & by R. H. Robson from de Delincourt's "The Cricket Match".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Molière [pseud.] : The Misanthrope

Meeting held at Eynsham, Shinfield Rd, 31.5.32.

George Burrow in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last approved


[...]

6. Victor Alexander then gave an outline of the career of Molière, & a sketch of the life of the XVIIth Century in France.


[...]

7. There followed a reading of the Misanthrope - abridged - in translation. The parts were taken as follows:

Philinte      Charles Stansfield
Alceste      Frank Pollard
Oronte      George Burrow
Célimène      Rosamund Wallis
Basque      Sylvanus Reynolds
Eliante      Mary S. W. Pollard
Clitandre      Edgar Castle
Acaste      Henry M. Wallis
A Guard      Victor Alexander
Arsinoë [Arsinoé]      Mary E. Robson

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Francis E. Pollard : [an account of the life of Walter Scott]

Meeting held at Ashton Lodge, Kendrick Rd., 13.x.32.

Henry M. Wallis in the chair

1. Minutes of last read & approved.


[...]

5. Francis E. Pollard then gave us an account of the life of Scott, interspersed with racy anecdotes. He gave us a lively picture of Scott's romantic outlook & of his keen historical interests.

6. Alfred Rawlings, who is endeared to us among other reasons as the stormy petrel of the Club, next launched an attack upon Scott as a poet, decrying his imperfections and slovenliness.

7. Henry M. Wallis then entertained us with the later work of Scott. Speaking as one wizard of another he almost succeeed in making us believe that he had been Scott's contemporary, & under his spell we caught something of the dazzling popularity of Scott's writings throughout the whole of Europe, and in particular of the cult for the Highlands and the Highlanders which sprang into being from his pen.

8. Towards the end of the evening we heard three readings, the first from Ivanhoe by Charles Stansfield who used the supper scenne in which Friar Tuch entertains the unknown knight, the second from the Heart of Midlothian by Frank Pollard in which Jeannie Deans pleads for her sister's life, & the third from Old Mortality by Rosamund Wallis describing the interrogation and torture inflicted upon the Covenanters.

All three readings held us enthralled, & all three papers aroused the maximum of discussion which a benevolent Chairman and a lenient hostess could allow. The time sped on beyond our usual hours, and as we took our leave we were still talking Scott.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Walter Scott : The Heart of Midlothian

Meeting held at Ashton Lodge, Kendrick Rd., 13.x.32.

Henry M. Wallis in the chair

1. Minutes of last read & approved.


[...]

5. Francis E. Pollard then gave us an account of the life of Scott, interspersed with racy anecdotes. He gave us a lively picture of Scott's romantic outlook & of his keen historical interests.

6. Alfred Rawlings, who is endeared to us among other reasons as the stormy petrel of the Club, next launched an attack upon Scott as a poet, decrying his imperfections and slovenliness.

7. Henry M. Wallis then entertained us with the later work of Scott. Speaking as one wizard of another he almost succeeed in making us believe that he had been Scott's contemporary, & under his spell we caught something of the dazzling popularity of Scott's writings throughout the whole of Europe, and in particular of the cult for the Highlands and the Highlanders which sprang into being from his pen.

8. Towards the end of the evening we heard three readings, the first from Ivanhoe by Charles Stansfield who used the supper scenne in which Friar Tuch entertains the unknown knight, the second from the Heart of Midlothian by Frank Pollard in which Jeannie Deans pleads for her sister's life, & the third from Old Mortality by Rosamund Wallis describing the interrogation and torture inflicted upon the Covenanters.

All three readings held us enthralled, & all three papers aroused the maximum of discussion which a benevolent Chairman and a lenient hostess could allow. The time sped on beyond our usual hours, and as we took our leave we were still talking Scott.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Francis E. Pollard : [a short account of the life and work of Mary Russell Mitford]

Meeting held at 70 Northcourt Avenue 28/4/1933

C. E. Stansfield in the chair


1 Minutes of last read and approved


2 For the Next Meeting's subject "The Jew in Literature" was chosen with Geo Burrow H. R. & E. B. Smith as committee


[...]


4 The evening's subject of Berkshire in Literature was then opened up by Charles E. Stansfield reading from Tom Browns School days a description of the Vale of the White Horse[.] He carried us into a quietude of time & space where a great lover of the Vale tells of the great open downs & the vale to the north of them.


Dorothy Brain told us something of Old Berkshire Ballads surprising us with their number & variety & read an amusing Ballad about a lad who died of eating custard, & the Lay of the Hunted Pig.


C. E. Stansfield read an introduction to "Summer is a Cumen In"which was then played and sung on the Gramophone.


H. R. Smith read a description of "Reading a Hundred Years Ago" from "Some Worthies of Reading"


F. E. Pollard introduced Mary Russell Mitford to the Club giving a short account of her life and Work quoting with approval a description of her as "A prose Crabbe in the Sun"


M. S. W. Pollard read "The Gypsy" from "Our Village"


Geo Burrows gave us a short Reading from Mathew Arnolds "Scholar Gypsy" and a longer one from "Thyrsis"[.] During this the Stansfield "Mackie" put in a striking piece of synchronization.


E. B. Castle read an interesting account of the Bucklebury Bowl Turner from H. V. Mortons "In Search of England".

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Howard Smith : Newcomers to Reading

Meeting held at Oakdene, Northcourt Av, 20.3.34.

Sylvanus A. Reynolds in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read and approved, in the teeth of one dissident.


[...]

5. We then proceeded to the anonymous essays and members felt on excellent terms with themselves at the prospect of hearing some attractive reading and of eluding or inflicting a good hoax or two.

The first essay opened discreetly without title on the theme of “Newcomers to Reading”, going on to a description of the neighbourhood, its beauties its quaint place names and historical associations. […]

6. Next came a paper on “Uniforms”. The writer was considered by one or two to show the observation of the masculine mind and the style of the feminine. […]

7. Then came a letter to "My dear Twelve" written with the unmistakeable touch of the practised writer. […]

8. We listened, too, with equal interest to a paper called “Canaries”, telling us something of the progress and perambulations of our latest migrant members. Moreover two or three of our number were able to follow their doings with particular appreciation, having mad much the same trip themselves. […]

9. All of us were a good deal non plussed by “Hors d’Oeuvres”, an essay not inappropriately named, for it contained a perplexing mixture of fare, and certainly stimulated our appetite. […]

10. Hardly less difficult was “Glastonbury”. Many of us had visited it, and so were able to follow closely the author’s points. But few of us knew enough of its history and legend to be sure whether or no our one professional historian had set his wits before us. So we gave up reasoning and just guessed. […]

11. Finally we heard “Spoonbill”. It was a noteworthy paper, combining the love of the naturalist for the birds he watches with the craft of the writer in the language he uses. […]

12. Here is the complete list. —

“Newcomers to Reading” by H. R. Smith, read by F. E. Pollard
“Uniforms” by Janet Rawlings, read by Elizabeth Alexander
“My dear Twelve” by H. M. Wallis, read by S. A. Reynolds
“Canaries” by C. E. Stansfield, read by Dorothy Brain
“Hors d’Oeuvres” by Dorothy Brain, read by R. H. Robson
“Glastonbury” by Mrs Goadby, read by H. R. Smith
“The Spoonbill” by W. Russell Brain, read by Mrs. Robson

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Manuscript: Unknown

  

H. A. L. Fisher : History of Europe

Meeting held at School House, L. P. : 13.9.35

Francis E. Pollard in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read and approved.

2. Account of the Excursion, contributed by R. H. Robson, read and approved.



[...]

7. We then listened to a number of extracts from books read during the summer.

[...]

8. F. E. Pollard followed with an analysis of Dante and his philosophy from H. A. L. Fisher’s History of Europe. There was a rather arresting comparison between the journeyings of Christian in the Pilgrim’s Progress + Dante’s Voyage of the Soul. Dante was portrayed as an aristocratic mystic and statesman, and the Roman Catholic Church appeared rather unexpectedly as a great mystical democracy owing to the melancholy relegation of several Pope to Hell.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Jane Austen : Sense and Sensibility

Meeting held at 30 Northcourt Avenue: 21.4.37.

  Ethel C. Stevens in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read & approved
[...]

6. V. W. Alexander read a paper on Jane Austen, half biographical sketch & half an appreciation of her style.


7. F. E. Pollard quoted from Lucy Harrison’s Literary Papers some telling and illuminating remarks, particularly about Fanny Price in Mansfield Park


8. Readings were then given
from Northanger Abbey by Celia Burrows
from Persuasion by Rosamund Wallis
from Sense and Sensibility by Francis & Mary Pollard
from Love and Friendship by Elizabeth Alexander
from Pride and Prejudice by Victor Alexander

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Lucy Harrison : A Lover of Books: The Life and Literary Papers of Lucy Harrison

Meeting held at 30 Northcourt Avenue: 21.4.37.

  Ethel C. Stevens in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read & approved
[...]

6. V. W. Alexander read a paper on Jane Austen, half biographical sketch & half an appreciation of her style.


7. F. E. Pollard quoted from Lucy Harrison’s Literary Papers some telling and illuminating remarks, particularly about Fanny Price in Mansfield Park


8. Readings were then given
from Northanger Abbey by Celia Burrows
from Persuasion by Rosamund Wallis
from Sense and Sensibility by Francis & Mary Pollard
from Love and Friendship by Elizabeth Alexander
from Pride and Prejudice by Victor Alexander

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

William Shakespeare : Macbeth

Meeting held at Ashton Lodge :- 3. 7. 37.

Henry Marriage Wallis in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read & approved


[...]

7. The Meeting then gave its attention to Witches.

H. M Wallis led off with a paper on Witchcraft and readings were given from the following books:- MacBeth – The Witch Scene[?] by Janet Rawlings, Dorothy Brain, & Dorothea Taylor with F. E. Pollard & V. W. Alexander as Banquo & MacBeth
Samuel – The Witch of Endor scene by Mary Robson
Westward Ho (Lucy), by Dorothy Brain
Trials for Witchcraft, by Howard Smith
Precious Bane, by Rosamund Wallis

Between all these items there was considerable discussion. Members were able to vie with one another in tale of mystery and eerie happenings, and if all the conversation was not strictly relevant at least the interest did not flag.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

William Fryer Harvey : August Heat

'Meeting held at Whinfell, Upper Redlands Rd. 23.10.’37

Alfred Rawlings in the Chair


1. The Secretary asked permission to reserve the reading of some of the minutes until after the literary part of the programme had been taken, as these minutes would bear directly upon the discussion which would necessarily follow as to the future of the Club. This permission was given and the other minutes were then read and approved.


2. Victor Alexander then gave a brief account of the career of William Fryer Harvey, followed by an appreciation and review of “We were Seven” which he had previously written for the Bootham Magazine.


3. Helen Rawlings read several of Harvey’s poems from the volume “Laughter and Ghosts[”].


4. Elizabeth T. Alexander read a chapter from “Caprimulgus”.


5. Frank Pollard read “August Heat” from Midnight House.


6. Janet Rawlings read “Patience” from Quaker Byways.


7. Charles E. Stansfield read two more poems from “Laughter and Ghosts”


8. Howard R. Smith read “The Tortoise” from Midnight House.


9. The Secretary then read the minutes referring to last time’s discussion on the Club’s future, and also two letters of resignation. These were from Edgar and Mignon Castle and from Dorothy Brain.


10. Discussion then followed.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Laurence Housman : Victoria Regina

'Meeting held 219 King’s Road: 27. 11. 37.

L. Dorothea Taylor in the Chair.

1. Minutes of last read and approved.

2. A number of scenes from Victoria Regina were then read. The young Queen’s part was read by Rosamund Wallis who abdicated later in favour of Celia Burrow. The Duchess of Kent was read by Ethel Stevens, and Francis Pollard was Prince Albert. Other members took subsidiary parts.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Æ [pseud.] : The one dimensional mind

Meeting held at St. Margaret’s, Shinfield Road: 20. 1. 38.

F. E. Pollard in the chair

1. Minutes of last read and approved

[...]

6. C. E. Stansfield opened the proceedings on Æ [A-E ligature, the name adopted by George William Russell] by a detailed biographical sketch of some length, in the course of which we gained some idea of the contradictions and complexities of A. E.’s character. [...] An interesting personal touch was added to the sketch by F. E. Pollard who had been present at one of Æ’s “salon” receptions.

7. Extracts from A. E’s prose were then read by Mary S. W. Pollard on “Gandhi,” and by F. E. Pollard on “The one dimensional mind”.

8. Finally F. E. Pollard and V. W. Alexander read three of A.E.’s poems.

9. By this time most of us were more than ready for a little lighter matter, and we thoroughly appreciated some delightful touches from The Tinker’s Wedding by Synge which Rosamund Wallis gave with evident relish.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Æ [pseud.] : [One or more unidentified poems]

Meeting held at St. Margaret’s, Shinfield Road: 20. 1. 38.

F. E. Pollard in the chair

1. Minutes of last read and approved

[...]

6. C. E. Stansfield opened the proceedings on Æ [A-E ligature, the name adopted by George William Russell] by a detailed biographical sketch of some length, in the course of which we gained some idea of the contradictions and complexities of A. E.’s character. [...] An interesting personal touch was added to the sketch by F. E. Pollard who had been present at one of Æ’s “salon” receptions.

7. Extracts from A. E’s prose were then read by Mary S. W. Pollard on “Gandhi,” and by F. E. Pollard on “The one dimensional mind”.

8. Finally F. E. Pollard and V. W. Alexander read three of A.E.’s poems.

9. By this time most of us were more than ready for a little lighter matter, and we thoroughly appreciated some delightful touches from The Tinker’s Wedding by Synge which Rosamund Wallis gave with evident relish.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      

  

John A. Spender : The Comments of Bagshot

February 15th was the date chosen for the next time and the subject “Books that people have been reading”


Meeting held at Oakdene: Northcourt Av.–15.2.38 Sylvanus A. Reynolds in the Chair.


1. Minutes of last read and approved

[...]


4. The first reading came from Reginald Robson who gave us an amusing extract from “Beasts & Superbeasts” by H. H. Munro


5. Mary S. Stansfield read from “Lawrence by his Friends” some interesting impressions contributed by some of these friends to a book edited by Lawrence’s brother. One passage by a man who knew Lawrence as a fellow aircraftman gave us a picture of him as a thoroughly likeable and popular hero, admired for his prowess as a motorcyclist.


6. Howard L. Sikes then read from Africa View by Julian Huxley. The passage concerned the respective advantages of Indirect and Direct Rule[...]. This reading produced considerable discussion on the same questions, and spread over on to the attitude of the French and the British toward their African dependant peoples, and members found something to ask or to say about almost every corner of Africa[...].


7. Elizabeth T. Alexander followed with an entertaining reading from Halliday Sutherland’s “A time to keep”. We shall carry in our minds for some time the dramatic appearance of Red William in his nightshirt urging the ladies in evening dress to run for their lives.


8. Roger Moore gave us some excellent fun in his reading from Benjamin Robert Haydon’s Autobiography, and we made some discoveries about Charles Lamb and Wordsworth too.


9. F. E. Pollard, greatly daring, then read from the “Comments of Bagshott” [sic] some shrewd remarks about the male and female of the human species[...].


10. H. R. Smith completed the programme with some well chosen paragraphs from “Those English” by Carl [i.e. Curt] von Stutterheim.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

John A. Spender : The Comments of Bagshot

February 15th was the date chosen for the next time and the subject “Books that people have been reading”


Meeting held at Oakdene: Northcourt Av.–15.2.38 Sylvanus A. Reynolds in the Chair.


1. Minutes of last read and approved

[...]


4. The first reading came from Reginald Robson who gave us an amusing extract from “Beasts & Superbeasts” by H. H. Munro


5. Mary S. Stansfield read from “Lawrence by his Friends” some interesting impressions contributed by some of these friends to a book edited by Lawrence’s brother. One passage by a man who knew Lawrence as a fellow aircraftman gave us a picture of him as a thoroughly likeable and popular hero, admired for his prowess as a motorcyclist.


6. Howard L. Sikes then read from Africa View by Julian Huxley. The passage concerned the respective advantages of Indirect and Direct Rule[...]. This reading produced considerable discussion on the same questions, and spread over on to the attitude of the French and the British toward their African dependant peoples, and members found something to ask or to say about almost every corner of Africa[...].


7. Elizabeth T. Alexander followed with an entertaining reading from Halliday Sutherland’s “A time to keep”. We shall carry in our minds for some time the dramatic appearance of Red William in his nightshirt urging the ladies in evening dress to run for their lives.


8. Roger Moore gave us some excellent fun in his reading from Benjamin Robert Haydon’s Autobiography, and we made some discoveries about Charles Lamb and Wordsworth too.


9. F. E. Pollard, greatly daring, then read from the “Comments of Bagshott” [sic] some shrewd remarks about the male and female of the human species[...].


10. H. R. Smith completed the programme with some well chosen paragraphs from “Those English” by Carl [i.e. Curt] von Stutterheim.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Kurt Von Stutterheim : Those English!

February 15th was the date chosen for the next time and the subject “Books that people have been reading”


Meeting held at Oakdene: Northcourt Av.–15.2.38 Sylvanus A. Reynolds in the Chair.


1. Minutes of last read and approved

[...]


4. The first reading came from Reginald Robson who gave us an amusing extract from “Beasts & Superbeasts” by H. H. Munro


5. Mary S. Stansfield read from “Lawrence by his Friends” some interesting impressions contributed by some of these friends to a book edited by Lawrence’s brother. One passage by a man who knew Lawrence as a fellow aircraftman gave us a picture of him as a thoroughly likeable and popular hero, admired for his prowess as a motorcyclist.


6. Howard L. Sikes then read from Africa View by Julian Huxley. The passage concerned the respective advantages of Indirect and Direct Rule[...]. This reading produced considerable discussion on the same questions, and spread over on to the attitude of the French and the British toward their African dependant peoples, and members found something to ask or to say about almost every corner of Africa[...].


7. Elizabeth T. Alexander followed with an entertaining reading from Halliday Sutherland’s “A time to keep”. We shall carry in our minds for some time the dramatic appearance of Red William in his nightshirt urging the ladies in evening dress to run for their lives.


8. Roger Moore gave us some excellent fun in his reading from Benjamin Robert Haydon’s Autobiography, and we made some discoveries about Charles Lamb and Wordsworth too.


9. F. E. Pollard, greatly daring, then read from the “Comments of Bagshott” [sic] some shrewd remarks about the male and female of the human species[...].


10. H. R. Smith completed the programme with some well chosen paragraphs from “Those English” by Carl [i.e. Curt] von Stutterheim.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

  

Kurt Von Stutterheim : Those English!

February 15th was the date chosen for the next time and the subject “Books that people have been reading”


Meeting held at Oakdene: Northcourt Av.–15.2.38 Sylvanus A. Reynolds in the Chair.


1. Minutes of last read and approved

[...]


4. The first reading came from Reginald Robson who gave us an amusing extract from “Beasts & Superbeasts” by H. H. Munro


5. Mary S. Stansfield read from “Lawrence by his Friends” some interesting impressions contributed by some of these friends to a book edited by Lawrence’s brother. One passage by a man who knew Lawrence as a fellow aircraftman gave us a picture of him as a thoroughly likeable and popular hero, admired for his prowess as a motorcyclist.


6. Howard L. Sikes then read from Africa View by Julian Huxley. The passage concerned the respective advantages of Indirect and Direct Rule[...]. This reading produced considerable discussion on the same questions, and spread over on to the attitude of the French and the British toward their African dependant peoples, and members found something to ask or to say about almost every corner of Africa[...].


7. Elizabeth T. Alexander followed with an entertaining reading from Halliday Sutherland’s “A time to keep”. We shall carry in our minds for some time the dramatic appearance of Red William in his nightshirt urging the ladies in evening dress to run for their lives.


8. Roger Moore gave us some excellent fun in his reading from Benjamin Robert Haydon’s Autobiography, and we made some discoveries about Charles Lamb and Wordsworth too.


9. F. E. Pollard, greatly daring, then read from the “Comments of Bagshott” [sic] some shrewd remarks about the male and female of the human species[...].


10. H. R. Smith completed the programme with some well chosen paragraphs from “Those English” by Carl [i.e. Curt] von Stutterheim.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis E. Pollard      Print: Book

 

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