Reading Experience Database
1450-1945

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Record 12113

Reading Experience:

Evidence:
'I should have written to you to-day to thank you for your flattering and kind-hearted mention of myself in the new Preface to Rookwood; if the weather had been finer I intended riding out to tell you how warmly I felt it, and how much sincere delight your friendship affords me.'
Century: 1800-1849
Date: 30 Oct 1837
Country: England
Time: n/a
Place: city: London
specific address: 48 Doughty Street
   
Type of Experience (Reader):
silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown
Type of Experience (Listener):
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Reader/Listener/Reading Group:

Reader:Charles Dickens
Age Adult (18-100+)
Gender Male
Date of Birth 7 Feb 1812
Socio-economic group: Clerk / tradesman / artisan / smallholder
Occupation: Journalist and writer
Religion: Church of England
Country of origin: England
Country of experience: England
Listeners present if any:
(e.g. family, servants, friends, workmates)
n/a
Additional comments: n/a

 

Text Being Read:

Author: William Harrison Ainsworth
Title: Rookwood
Genre: Fiction
Form of Text: Print: Book
Publication details: 18/10/1837, Bentley?s Standard Novels edn.
Provenance: unknown

 

Source Information:

Record ID: 12113  
Source - Print  
  Author: Charles Dickens
  Editor: Madeline House
  Title: The Letters of Charles Dickens: Volume One: 1820-1839
  Place of Publication: Oxford
  Date of Publication: 1965
  Vol: 1
  Page: 325
  Additional comments: Additional editor: Graham Storey. Published by Clarendon Press as the Pilgrim edition.

Citation: Charles Dickens, Madeline House (ed.), The Letters of Charles Dickens: Volume One: 1820-1839 (Oxford, 1965), 1, p. 325, http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/reading/recorddetails2.php?id=12113, accessed: 24 April 2019

Additional comments:

Note 9 explains that the new Preface read: ?Mr. Dickens, with his wonderful knowledge of London life and character, has done more for this metropolis, in the Pickwick Papers, and in Oliver Twist, than Paul de Knock, in all his works, has one for Paris.? This appeared as a footnote in the preface to the new edition dated 18/10/1837, in Bentley?s Standard Novels edn.

 

 

Reading Experience Database version 2.0.  Page updated: 27th Apr 2016  3:15pm (GMT)