Reading Experience Database
1450-1945

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Record 25198

Reading Experience:

Evidence:
Robert Southey to Charles Watkin Williams Wynn, 12 September 1797: 'I much want the latter books of Amadis, subsequent to those which Tressan has abridged & prior to Amadis of Greece: you know my great attachment to the old romances. I know the Portugueze Palmerin. it has fine parts but deserves not the praise of Cervantes.'
Century: 1700-1799
Date: Until: 12 Sep 1797
Country: unknown
Time: n/a
Place: n/a
   
Type of Experience (Reader):
silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown
Type of Experience (Listener):
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Reader/Listener/Reading Group:

Reader:Robert Southey
Age Adult (18-100+)
Gender Male
Date of Birth 12 Aug 1774
Socio-economic group: Professional / academic / merchant / farmer
Occupation: writer and lawyer
Religion: n/a
Country of origin: England
Country of experience: unknown
Listeners present if any:
(e.g. family, servants, friends, workmates)
n/a
Additional comments: n/a

 

Text Being Read:

Author: anon
Title: Palmerin of England
Genre: Fiction
Form of Text: Print: Book
Publication details: n/a
Provenance: unknown

 

Source Information:

Record ID: 25198  
Source - Manuscript Other
  Author: "The Collected Letters of Robert Southey," Romantic Circles Electronic Edition, Letter 256. http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/southey_letters. Accessed 29 April 2009. ,

Citation: "The Collected Letters of Robert Southey," Romantic Circles Electronic Edition, Letter 256. http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/southey_letters. Accessed 29 April 2009. , http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/reading/recorddetails2.php?id=25198, accessed: 25 June 2019

Additional comments:

Source eds note: "Southey mistakenly believed that the romance Palmerin of England had Portuguese origins and argued this case in his own translation, which appeared in 1807. In the sixth chapter of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547–1616), Don Quixote (1605–1615), the curate declares: ‘let this Palm of England be cared for and preserved, as a thing singular in its kind, and let a casket be made for it, like that which Alexander found among the spoils of Darius, and destined to keep in it the work of Homer’."

 

 

Reading Experience Database version 2.0.  Page updated: 27th Apr 2016  3:15pm (GMT)