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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
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Record Number: 20106


Reading Experience:

Evidence:

'I think she thought I was French as I was reading the "Matin". But when I picked up Lamb which was obviously an English book, she began throwing out leading questions.'

Century:

1900-1945

Date:

Between 21 Nov 1886 and 30 Aug 1935

Country:

France

Time

n/a

Place:

other location: on a train from Dieppe

Type of Experience
(Reader):
 

silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Type of Experience
(Listener):
 

solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown


Reader / Listener / Reading Group:

Reader:

Harold Nicolson

Age:

Adult (18-100+)

Gender:

Male

Date of Birth:

21 Nov 1886

Socio-Economic Group:

Royalty / aristocracy

Occupation:

Diplomat

Religion:

unknown

Country of Origin:

England

Country of Experience:

France

Listeners present if any:
e.g family, servants, friends

n/a


Additional Comments:

n/a



Text Being Read:

Author:

Charles Lamb

Title:

unknown

Genre:

Unknown

Form of Text:

Print: Book

Publication Details

n/a

Provenance

unknown


Source Information:

Record ID:

20106

Source:

Print

Author:

Harold Nicolson

Editor:

Nigel Nicolson

Title:

Vita and Harold

Place of Publication:

Great Britain

Date of Publication:

1992

Vol:

n/a

Page:

275

Additional Comments:

Quotation taken from a letter dated 30 August 1935 written by Harold Nicolson to Vita Sackville-West.

Citation:

Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson (ed.), Vita and Harold (Great Britain, 1992), p. 275, http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/RED/record_details.php?id=20106, accessed: 03 October 2022


Additional Comments:

Earlier in the letter Harold describes sharing a train compartment with an American family of three: a mother, father and son. He refers in this extract to the mother. He mentions two reading experiences, Lamb and the French newspaper the "Matin".

   
   
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