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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

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Record Number: 22677


Reading Experience:

Evidence:

MS annotations incl. v.1 p.534: "A ludicrous map, palpably incorrect at every point. Malplaquet is on the wrong side of the French line, and the attack on the French left flank in the wood is not represented at all, though the chief feature of the day." P. 575 next to the text "the artifices and baseness of William III", Sir George writes: "Fool read thy Macaulay".

Century:

1850-1899

Date:

unknown

Country:

England

Time

n/a

Place:

n/a

Type of Experience
(Reader):
 

silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Type of Experience
(Listener):
 

solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown


Reader / Listener / Reading Group:

Reader:

George Otto Trevelyan

Age:

Adult (18-100+)

Gender:

Male

Date of Birth:

20 Jul 1838

Socio-Economic Group:

Gentry

Occupation:

Historian and statesman

Religion:

n/a

Country of Origin:

England

Country of Experience:

England

Listeners present if any:
e.g family, servants, friends

n/a


Additional Comments:

n/a



Text Being Read:

Author:

James Grant

Title:

British battles on land and sea

Genre:

History

Form of Text:

Print: Book

Publication Details

London: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.1873-5 (3v.)

Provenance

owned


Source Information:

Record ID:

22677

Source - Manuscript:

Other

Author:

MS note in book cited below ,

Citation:

MS note in book cited below , http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/RED/record_details.php?id=22677, accessed: 20 January 2022


Additional Comments:

This book was a Christmas gift to Robert Trevelyan, Sir George's son, from "Aunt Maggie Xmas 1884". It is therefore possible that Sir George read it to or with his sons and found it wanting in historical accuracy!

   
   
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