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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

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Record Number: 22682


Reading Experience:

Evidence:

Many MS notes, some of which are transcribed from those of Lord Macaulay in another edition: "Macaulay's notes and marginal lines (on the outside margins) are transferred from his Bipontine edition. His notes are marked with an "M"." Sir George's dates of reading include: "Florence Jan. 22 1901. The day of Queen Victoria's death"; Jam 25 1901 "On way from Florence to Rome, Edward the Seventh proclaimed yesterday"; June 22 1920; Aug 2 1924 "Read with unceasing zest and admiration. May I live to finish him! But I was 86 last month"; p.740: "a rare good writer. But a very difficult one to read, I must confess, as a student of very mature age (1924)"; Dec 24 1924 "With Herodotus and Thucydides, he appertains to the first three historians of the Ancient World. I am reading them all again, with Suetonius if indeed I can live to finish them. This is the 4th time in this century that I have read them all through"; Jan 17 1925. P.1629, Sir George writes: "The development of Nero is a marvellous story, marvellously told; - as Carlyle would have written it, had he been a Roman of the age of Tacitus. I read it as I read the "French Revolution" in the Trinity backs in the summer of 1858, when I ought to have been reading Pindar and Thucydides. That summer I read the French Revolution three times on end [underlined twice]; besides devouring the Third Volume of "Modern Painters" and "Men and Women". As far as a place in the classical Tripos was concerned I doubt if I could have been better employed." P.2750: "As fine history, and as much to my mind, as any I ever read. Tacitus was much the same age as Carlyle, when he wrote the French Revolution, - which I read as an undergraduate at Trinity; reading three times through one end, with no book between. I did very much the same by this volume of Tacitus in the course of this winter, at 87 years of age."

Century:

1900-1945

Date:

Between 1901 and 1925

Country:

England

Time

n/a

Place:

city: Florence
other location: Also, Rome and Wallington (Northumberland)

Type of Experience
(Reader):
 

silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Type of Experience
(Listener):
 

solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown


Reader / Listener / Reading Group:

Reader:

George Otto Trevelyan

Age:

Adult (18-100+)

Gender:

Male

Date of Birth:

20 Jul 1838

Socio-Economic Group:

Gentry

Occupation:

Historian and statesman

Religion:

n/a

Country of Origin:

England

Country of Experience:

England

Listeners present if any:
e.g family, servants, friends

n/a


Additional Comments:

n/a



Text Being Read:

Author:

Cornelius Tacitus

Title:

Opera omnia

Genre:

Classics, History

Form of Text:

Print: Book

Publication Details

London: Valpy, 1821 (10v. Delphin classics)

Provenance

owned


Source Information:

Record ID:

22682

Source - Manuscript:

Other

Author:

MS notes in book cited below,

Citation:

MS notes in book cited below, http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/RED/record_details.php?id=22682, accessed: 20 January 2022


Additional Comments:

I have not transcribed all the notes from this book.

   
   
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