Switch to English Switch to French

The Open University  |   Study at the OU  |   About the OU  |   Research at the OU  |   Search the OU

Listen to this page  |   Accessibility

the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
  RED International Logo

RED Australia logo


RED Canada logo
RED Netherlands logo
RED New Zealand logo

Record Number: 3661


Reading Experience:

Evidence:

Letter H 3 - 9/2/1855 - "I will not fail to quote Mrs Browning in the book I am now about. I think more highly of her poetry than ever - she is a noble creature."

Century:

1800-1849, 1850-1899

Date:

unknown

Country:

Probably Britain, but reader travelled extensively

Time

n/a

Place:

n/a

Type of Experience
(Reader):
 

silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Type of Experience
(Listener):
 

solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown


Reader / Listener / Reading Group:

Reader:

John Ruskin

Age:

Adult (18-100+)

Gender:

Male

Date of Birth:

8 Feb 1819

Socio-Economic Group:

Professional / academic / merchant / farmer

Occupation:

Writer and art critic

Religion:

Christian

Country of Origin:

England

Country of Experience:

Probably Britain, but reader travelled extensively

Listeners present if any:
e.g family, servants, friends

n/a


Additional Comments:

n/a



Text Being Read:

Author:

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Title:

Poems, including "Drama of Exile"

Genre:

Poetry

Form of Text:

Print: Book

Publication Details

n/a

Provenance

unknown


Source Information:

Record ID:

3661

Source:

Print

Author:

John Ruskin

Editor:

Virginia Surtees

Title:

Sublime and Instructive. Letters from John Ruskin to Louisa, Marchioness of Waterford, Anna Blunden and Elle Heaton.

Place of Publication:

London

Date of Publication:

1972

Vol:

n/a

Page:

155

Additional Comments:

From the editor's footnote: "Ruskin had been rereading Mrs Browning's poems, which were to him of 'unspeakable preciousness'. 'I trust that you may be a little pleased by some things I shall have to say of you in the book I am just about now' he wrote to her on March 4th 1855. 'I am going to bind your poems in a golden binding, and give them to my class of working men - as the purest and most exalting poetry in our language. Only, pray, in the next edition, alter that first verse of the "Drama of Exile" (1844) - Gehenna and when a -' (The Works of John Ruskin Library Edition, ed. E.T. Cook and Alexander Wedderburn, 39 vols, George Allen, 1903-12, Volume 36, pp. 191-2. From a letter to Ellen Heaton (9/2/1855) and a letter to Elizabeth Barrett Browning (4/3/1855).

Citation:

John Ruskin, Virginia Surtees (ed.), Sublime and Instructive. Letters from John Ruskin to Louisa, Marchioness of Waterford, Anna Blunden and Elle Heaton. (London, 1972), p. 155, http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/RED/record_details.php?id=3661, accessed: 23 February 2024


Additional Comments:

None

   
   
Green Turtle Web Design