Reading Experience Database
1450-1945

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Record 7532

Reading Experience:

Evidence:
'I have done, as usual, almost nothing since we parted- Some one asked me with a smile, of which I knew not the meaning, if I would read that book, putting into my hands a volume of Rousseau's confessions. It is perhaps the most remarkable tome, I ever read. Except for its occassional obscenity, I might wish to see the remainder of the book: to try if possible to connect the character of Jean Jacques with my previous ideas of human nature.'
Century: 1800-1849
Date: 31 May 1819
Country: Scotland
Time: n/a
Place: n/a
   
Type of Experience (Reader):
silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown
Type of Experience (Listener):
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Reader/Listener/Reading Group:

Reader:Thomas Carlyle
Age Adult (18-100+)
Gender Male
Date of Birth 4 Dec 1795
Socio-economic group: Professional / academic / merchant / farmer
Occupation: Writer / Academic
Religion: Lapsed Calvinist
Country of origin: Scotland
Country of experience: Scotland
Listeners present if any:
(e.g. family, servants, friends, workmates)
n/a
Additional comments: n/a

 

Text Being Read:

Author: Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Title: Confessions
Genre: Autobiog / Diary
Form of Text: Print: Book
Publication details: First pub 1782-89, 4 vols
Provenance: borrowed (other)

 

Source Information:

Record ID: 7532  
Source - Print  
  Author: Thomas Carlyle
  Editor: C R Sanders
  Title: The Collected Letters of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle
  Place of Publication: Durham, North Carolina
  Date of Publication: 1970
  Vol: 1
  Page: 179
  Additional comments: n/a

Citation: Thomas Carlyle, C R Sanders (ed.), The Collected Letters of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle (Durham, North Carolina, 1970), 1, p. 179, http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/reading/recorddetails2.php?id=7532, accessed: 10 June 2023

Additional comments:

Taken from letter from Carlyle to Robert Mitchell, dated 31st May 1819, written at Mainhill. Pages 178 - 180 in this edition. Information about the work are given in the editor's notes. It is unclear from the letter which volume Carlyle was reading. Carlyle mentions that he has read the book 'since we parted' but I am unable to trace in the other letters what date this was, so am unable to estimate a date range for reading experience.

 

 

Reading Experience Database version 2.0.  Page updated: 27th Apr 2016  3:15pm (GMT)