Reading Experience Database
1450-1945

Basic Search

Advanced Search

Record 21209

Reading Experience:

Evidence:
'La Silence de la Mer by "Vercors" (Schlumberger?) was given me by Raymond Mortimer yesterday and read without much admiration though with plenty of sympathy: published secretly under the Nazis in France. Read also too slow a story by Giono of the coming of Pan: it quickens at the end where human beings and animals dance together, with regrettable results [...] Read too in Illusions Perdues [...] and in Gide's Journal [...] Gide aroused my envy by reading, reading, but if I kept a journal I too should appear to have read, read a lot.'
Century: 1900-1945
Date: Between 1 Jan 1943 and 31 Dec 1943
Country: England
Time: n/a
Place: n/a
   
Type of Experience (Reader):
silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown
Type of Experience (Listener):
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Reader/Listener/Reading Group:

Reader:Edward Morgan Forster
Age Adult (18-100+)
Gender Male
Date of Birth 1 Jan 1879
Socio-economic group: Professional / academic / merchant / farmer
Occupation: Writer
Religion: n/a
Country of origin: England
Country of experience: England
Listeners present if any:
(e.g. family, servants, friends, workmates)
n/a
Additional comments: n/a

 

Text Being Read:

Author: Honore de Balzac
Title: Illusions perdues
Genre: Fiction
Form of Text: Print: Book
Publication details: n/a
Provenance: unknown

 

Source Information:

Record ID: 21209  
Source - Print  
  Author: E. M. Forster
  Editor: Philip Gardner
  Title: Commonplace Book
  Place of Publication: London
  Date of Publication: 1985
  Vol: n/a
  Page: 155
  Additional comments: n/a

Citation: E. M. Forster, Philip Gardner (ed.), Commonplace Book (London, 1985), p. 155, http://can-red-lec.library.dal.ca/Arts/reading/recorddetails2.php?id=21209, accessed: 21 June 2024

Additional comments:

See also p.161 in source for further comments on reading of this text, from Forster's 1943 Commonplace Book, where Forster remarks on 'the bad taste of Balzac, his unpolished journalistic style, his formlessness, his unevenness, his obsession with money,' concluding: 'Having never had to earn my living, I pick faults in him where I can.'

 

 

Reading Experience Database version 2.0.  Page updated: 27th Apr 2016  3:15pm (GMT)